APM - OS2

This is a discussion on APM - OS2 ; I've never used Advanced Power Management, but with our electricity bills going up 50%, it's probaby a good time. How would I set it up in eCS? I already turn off my monitor at night. Thanks, Alan -- ---------------------------------------------------------------------- ** ...

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Thread: APM

  1. APM

    I've never used Advanced Power Management, but with our electricity bills
    going up 50%, it's probaby a good time. How would I set it up in eCS? I
    already turn off my monitor at night.

    Thanks,


    Alan

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  2. Re: APM

    nobody@junk.min.net wrote:
    > I've never used Advanced Power Management, but with our electricity bills
    > going up 50%, it's probaby a good time. How would I set it up in eCS? I
    > already turn off my monitor at night.
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    >
    > Alan
    >

    How hard is it to completely shut down your computer for about 16 hours
    out of every 24, and spend about 1 or 2 minutes booting it the next day?

    eCS installation allows you to choose power management, but APM is old
    style; ACPI is the way most recent machines are built to conserve power.
    For eCS, though, ACPI is still under development.

    You may be able to turn on APM by opening "Local System" and "Selective
    Install", which is an old Warp dialog.

  3. Re: APM

    In <467481f2$0$4717$4c368faf@roadrunner.com>, on 06/16/07
    at 05:36 PM, Colin Campbell said:

    >How hard is it to completely shut down your computer for about 16 hours
    >out of every 24, and spend about 1 or 2 minutes booting it the next day?


    Not difficult at all. I'd always heard that it was better for the
    hardware (specifically hard drives) to not turn it off an on, which is why
    I didn't.

    >eCS installation allows you to choose power management, but APM is old
    >style; ACPI is the way most recent machines are built to conserve power.
    > For eCS, though, ACPI is still under development.


    I've seen that.

    >You may be able to turn on APM by opening "Local System" and "Selective
    >Install", which is an old Warp dialog.


    I'll look. Thanks,

    Alan

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  4. Re: APM

    On Thu, 21 Jun 2007 17:00:01 UTC, nobody@junk.min.net wrote:

    > I'd always heard that it was better for the
    > hardware (specifically hard drives) to not turn it off an on


    Unless you turn it on and off 100 times per day or you have a rather old
    SCSI hard drive that is rubbish.
    --
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  5. Re: APM

    On 22 Jun 2007 20:29:04 GMT, Peter Weilbacher wrote:

    > On Thu, 21 Jun 2007 17:00:01 UTC, nobody@junk.min.net wrote:
    >
    >> I'd always heard that it was better for the
    >> hardware (specifically hard drives) to not turn it off an on

    >
    > Unless you turn it on and off 100 times per day or you have a rather old
    > SCSI hard drive that is rubbish.


    You are entited to your opinion. I'm entitled to mine, and it differs to yours.

  6. Re: APM

    Paul Ratcliffe wrote:
    > On 22 Jun 2007 20:29:04 GMT, Peter Weilbacher wrote:
    >
    >> On Thu, 21 Jun 2007 17:00:01 UTC, nobody@junk.min.net wrote:
    >>
    >>> I'd always heard that it was better for the
    >>> hardware (specifically hard drives) to not turn it off an on

    >> Unless you turn it on and off 100 times per day or you have a rather old
    >> SCSI hard drive that is rubbish.

    >
    > You are entited to your opinion. I'm entitled to mine, and it differs to yours.

    Paul,
    Have you had actual failures that you can attribute to powering up and
    down the hardware, at some reasonable rate, such as once per day?

    I have not. I am currently using a computer built for me by Indelible
    Blue several years ago, and a Dell Dimension 8400 that I configured and
    bought 30 months ago. I have some monitor flicker on the old machine,
    which I use sporadically. The Dell is turned on and off daily, and has
    shown no problems. It has dual hard drives, a CD burner, a DVD burner,
    a floppy drive, etc. The other machines I've had at home over the past
    twenty plus years have never had a hardware failure.

    I'd like to think that I'm safe treating the hardware this way, but I
    have no "proof" that it's OK. If you have any studies to cite that say
    I should treat this stuff differently, I'd appreciate learning about them.

  7. Re: APM

    On Sun, 24 Jun 2007 21:14:52 -0700, Colin Campbell wrote:

    :>Paul Ratcliffe wrote:
    :>> On 22 Jun 2007 20:29:04 GMT, Peter Weilbacher wrote:
    :>>
    :>>> On Thu, 21 Jun 2007 17:00:01 UTC, nobody@junk.min.net wrote:
    :>>>
    :>>>> I'd always heard that it was better for the
    :>>>> hardware (specifically hard drives) to not turn it off an on
    :>>> Unless you turn it on and off 100 times per day or you have a rather old
    :>>> SCSI hard drive that is rubbish.
    :>>
    :>> You are entited to your opinion. I'm entitled to mine, and it differs to yours.
    :>Paul,
    :>Have you had actual failures that you can attribute to powering up and
    :>down the hardware, at some reasonable rate, such as once per day?
    :>
    :>I have not. I am currently using a computer built for me by Indelible
    :>Blue several years ago, and a Dell Dimension 8400 that I configured and
    :>bought 30 months ago. I have some monitor flicker on the old machine,
    :>which I use sporadically. The Dell is turned on and off daily, and has
    :>shown no problems. It has dual hard drives, a CD burner, a DVD burner,
    :>a floppy drive, etc. The other machines I've had at home over the past
    :>twenty plus years have never had a hardware failure.
    :>
    :>I'd like to think that I'm safe treating the hardware this way, but I
    :>have no "proof" that it's OK. If you have any studies to cite that say
    :>I should treat this stuff differently, I'd appreciate learning about them.

    I have no experience that cycling the power makes electronics last shorter.
    The monitors I use I switch off whenever I leave for more than say 15
    minutes, sometimes that's more than 10 times per day. My Fujitsu e176 CRT
    monitor withstood 7 years of this and is in in excellent condition. A very
    old 15 inch VGA monitor had to have the power switch replaced once, due to
    the large in-rush current and the cheap switch.
    Same for PCs. Some get switched on 4-5 times a day (in weekends). Never had a
    failure yet.
    And in our office building at work, the fluorescent lightning is switched off
    when the IR sensor doesn't see something moving for 10 minutes - this happens
    many times a day when you leave the office.
    On the other hand, I do know that certain components like electrolytic
    capacitors have a fairly short power-on lifespan measured in thousand of
    hours (although it gets rapidly better if the temperature is kept low).

    Mat Nieuwenhoven





  8. Re: APM

    On Sun, 24 Jun 2007 21:14:52 -0700, Colin Campbell wrote:

    >>>> I'd always heard that it was better for the
    >>>> hardware (specifically hard drives) to not turn it off an on
    >>> Unless you turn it on and off 100 times per day or you have a rather old
    >>> SCSI hard drive that is rubbish.

    >>
    >> You are entited to your opinion. I'm entitled to mine, and it differs to yours.

    >
    > Have you had actual failures that you can attribute to powering up and
    > down the hardware, at some reasonable rate, such as once per day?


    No, because I don't do it. I did however have a large number of failures of
    hard disks on PCs that had been running for years and were then switched off
    for a few weeks. When I tried to restart them, at least 50% of them wouldn't.
    If they were switched off/on daily, I'm fairly sure the failure would have
    occurred sooner, although obviously I have no evidence to back that up in
    this specific case.

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