Roadrunner & OS/2? - OS2

This is a discussion on Roadrunner & OS/2? - OS2 ; Roadrunner cable broadband with home networking is being installed in a couple of weeks. The primary interface will be a laptop using Windows/XP. Is there any way that I can get my OS/2 desktop system to participate? Bob (Remove "NOT" ...

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Thread: Roadrunner & OS/2?

  1. Roadrunner & OS/2?

    Roadrunner cable broadband with home networking is being installed in a
    couple of weeks. The primary interface will be a laptop using Windows/XP.
    Is there any way that I can get my OS/2 desktop system to participate?

    Bob
    (Remove "NOT" from E-mail address before using)


  2. Re: Roadrunner & OS/2?

    On Wed, 16 Aug 2006 23:39:23 UTC, NotesNOT4Bob@attglobal.net wrote:

    -> Roadrunner cable broadband with home networking is being installed in a
    -> couple of weeks. The primary interface will be a laptop using Windows/XP.
    -> Is there any way that I can get my OS/2 desktop system to participate?

    Its an old site but you might want to check out
    http://larkin.nuclearwinter.com/rros2/

    Mark


    --
    From the eComStation of Mark Dodel

    http://www.os2voice.org
    Warpstock 2006, Windsor, Ontario, Canada, Oct 12-15, 2006 -
    http://www.warpstock.org

  3. Re: Roadrunner & OS/2?

    What you need is a router. I use a Linksys WRT54G, but have also used
    a BEFSR41. It goes like this:

    RR cable modem > router > multimple systems via ports on the back of
    the router.

    If you don't need the wireless WRT54G, there are many versions of the
    Linksys routers available on eBay and in stores. The router also
    provides a firewall, and thus more security, as well as multiple
    ethernet ports. On my network, I have a desktop (XP), ThinkPad (XP),
    2 desktops running eCS, an IBM Netfinity server, 2 networked printers,
    and, until recently, a Power Mac running OSX.

    You need to make sure that they are all set up on the same workgroup,
    and for the OS/2 based system, in
    x:\ibmlan\ibmlan.ini > srvhidden = no to make the system visible to
    the windoze system.

    HTH

    On Wed, 16 Aug 2006 23:39:23 UTC, NotesNOT4Bob@attglobal.net wrote:

    > Roadrunner cable broadband with home networking is being installed in a
    > couple of weeks. The primary interface will be a laptop using Windows/XP.
    > Is there any way that I can get my OS/2 desktop system to participate?
    >
    > Bob
    > (Remove "NOT" from E-mail address before using)
    >



    --
    Tom Brown, Catherder

  4. Re: Roadrunner & OS/2?

    Thanks for the link, Mark! Could prove useful...

    On Thu, 17 Aug 2006 00:12:24 UTC, "Mark Dodel"
    wrote:

    > On Wed, 16 Aug 2006 23:39:23 UTC, NotesNOT4Bob@attglobal.net wrote:
    >
    > -> Roadrunner cable broadband with home networking is being installed in a
    > -> couple of weeks. The primary interface will be a laptop using Windows/XP.
    > -> Is there any way that I can get my OS/2 desktop system to participate?
    >
    > Its an old site but you might want to check out
    > http://larkin.nuclearwinter.com/rros2/
    >
    > Mark
    >
    >



    --
    Tom Brown, Catherder

  5. Re: Roadrunner & OS/2?

    In article <44e3acab@kcnews03>, NotesNOT4Bob@attglobal.net wrote:
    >Roadrunner cable broadband with home networking is being installed in a
    >couple of weeks. The primary interface will be a laptop using Windows/XP.
    >Is there any way that I can get my OS/2 desktop system to participate?


    "It depends".

    To use the OS/2 machine to access the Internet, it may be as simple as
    configuring TCP/IP on the Ethernet adapter and selecting DHCP addressing.
    If RR requires special logon procedures then the site Mark provided may
    prove useful. Many cable networks now don't require a logon procedure, or
    they configure the router/modem to do it for you. If you're not sure,
    provide a URL to your local RR host site's help and FAQ pages so we can
    figure out from their instructions what will be needed.

    Sharing resources such as printers and disks between the OS/2 machine and
    the XP machine is a whole other topic which I'll leave to those who've done
    it recently.

    --
    Don Hills (dmhills at attglobaldotnet) Wellington, New Zealand
    "New interface closely resembles Presentation Manager,
    preparing you for the wonders of OS/2!"
    -- Advertisement on the box for Microsoft Windows 2.11 for 286

  6. Re: Roadrunner & OS/2?

    In message - "Mark Dodel"
    Wed, 16 Aug 2006 19:12:24 -0500 writes:
    >
    >On Wed, 16 Aug 2006 23:39:23 UTC, NotesNOT4Bob@attglobal.net wrote:
    >
    >-> Roadrunner cable broadband with home networking is being installed in a
    >-> couple of weeks. The primary interface will be a laptop using Windows/XP.
    >-> Is there any way that I can get my OS/2 desktop system to participate?
    >
    >Its an old site but you might want to check out
    >http://larkin.nuclearwinter.com/rros2/
    >
    >Mark
    >
    >
    >--
    >From the eComStation of Mark Dodel
    >
    > http://www.os2voice.org
    > Warpstock 2006, Windsor, Ontario, Canada, Oct 12-15, 2006 -
    >http://www.warpstock.org


    Thanks. It appears to be about what I want to do, but it does not seem
    to reference anything beyond 1998. Also, I haven't the slightest idea
    what they mean when they say, for example, "CNAME (DNS alias)" or
    "authentication servers can be found by doing a DNS lookup" (whatever a
    DNS is).

    It is encouraging, though, because it appears it can be done. I think
    that I can get it done using some of the other replies to this question.


    Bob


  7. Re: Roadrunner & OS/2?

    In message - "Tom Brown"
    Thu, 17 Aug 2006 00:28:30 GMT writes:
    >
    >What you need is a router. I use a Linksys WRT54G, but have also used
    >a BEFSR41. It goes like this:
    >
    >RR cable modem > router > multimple systems via ports on the back of
    >the router.
    >
    >If you don't need the wireless WRT54G, there are many versions of the
    >Linksys routers available on eBay and in stores. The router also
    >provides a firewall, and thus more security, as well as multiple
    >ethernet ports. On my network, I have a desktop (XP), ThinkPad (XP),
    >2 desktops running eCS, an IBM Netfinity server, 2 networked printers,
    >and, until recently, a Power Mac running OSX.
    >
    >You need to make sure that they are all set up on the same workgroup,
    >and for the OS/2 based system, in
    >x:\ibmlan\ibmlan.ini > srvhidden = no to make the system visible to
    >the windoze system.
    >
    >HTH
    >
    >On Wed, 16 Aug 2006 23:39:23 UTC, NotesNOT4Bob@attglobal.net wrote:
    >
    >> Roadrunner cable broadband with home networking is being installed in a
    >> couple of weeks. The primary interface will be a laptop using Windows/XP.
    >> Is there any way that I can get my OS/2 desktop system to participate?
    >>
    >> Bob
    >> (Remove "NOT" from E-mail address before using)
    >>

    >
    >
    >--
    >Tom Brown, Catherder


    Tom,

    Thanks for the great help. I am beginning to get an idea of how it
    will work, but I do not know what software or hardware I need.

    I have a WRT54GS router which I surmised from the writeup I would need
    to have home networking. I picked it because it seemed to have the
    most things I think I will need. It would appear, however, that I need
    something on my desktop.

    I have a telephone modem in my computer which I will no longer need,
    and RR says all I need is a USB port (of which I have plenty), but I
    do not see how that will give me home networking. I suspect I need to
    add something to my desktop to allow home networking.

    Additionally, I evidently need some hardware attachment or card to
    allow OS/2 to use the network, and that is the number one desire.
    However, I do not know what to get.

    You mention "x:\ibmlan\ibmlan.ini > srvhidden = no to make the system
    visible to the windoze system" but I do not have an IMBLAN directory.
    Do I need to install some software from my IBM installation disks?

    Sorry if I sound clueless, but I am.

    Bob


  8. Re: Roadrunner & OS/2?

    In message - black.hole.4.spam@gmail.com
    (Don Hills)Thu, 17 Aug 2006 12:56:18 +1200 writes:
    >
    >In article <44e3acab@kcnews03>, NotesNOT4Bob@attglobal.net wrote:
    >>Roadrunner cable broadband with home networking is being installed in a
    >>couple of weeks. The primary interface will be a laptop using Windows/XP.
    >>Is there any way that I can get my OS/2 desktop system to participate?

    >
    >"It depends".
    >
    >To use the OS/2 machine to access the Internet, it may be as simple as
    >configuring TCP/IP on the Ethernet adapter and selecting DHCP addressing.
    >If RR requires special logon procedures then the site Mark provided may
    >prove useful. Many cable networks now don't require a logon procedure, or
    >they configure the router/modem to do it for you. If you're not sure,
    >provide a URL to your local RR host site's help and FAQ pages so we can
    >figure out from their instructions what will be needed.
    >
    >Sharing resources such as printers and disks between the OS/2 machine and
    >the XP machine is a whole other topic which I'll leave to those who've done
    >it recently.
    >
    >--
    >Don Hills (dmhills at attglobaldotnet) Wellington, New Zealand
    >"New interface closely resembles Presentation Manager,
    > preparing you for the wonders of OS/2!"
    > -- Advertisement on the box for Microsoft Windows 2.11 for 286


    Don,

    Thanks, but I haven't the foggest idea how to "configure TCP/IP" on
    the Eithernet adapter. I do not have an eithernet card on my desktop.
    (I don't think I do -- how would I know?) What is DHCP and DHCP addressing?

    I don't know what the RR host site is, yet, but I will post when I find
    out.


    Bob


  9. Re: Roadrunner & OS/2?

    With the WRT54GS, all you need is a NIC set up to get it's IP address
    via DHCP from the router. You need to tell your cable company that you
    need an external cable modem with an Ethernet interface, NOT USB! A
    revised setup looks like:

    Cable > RR cable modem > router > computers

    Again, there should be NO USB involved. My RR cable modem is a
    Motorola SURFboard model SB5100. This was a replacement for some
    earlier model sometime in the past year or two.

    It sounds like you did not install the networking part of OS/2. I
    don't see that you have told us what flavor of OS/2 you are running.
    That will make some difference in further advice that can be offered.
    Warp4? eCS (1.0, 1.1, 1.2, etc.)? Essentially you need to add
    networking support from your installation CD. Let us know where you
    started from, and we can tell you which way to proceed.

    HTH

    On Fri, 18 Aug 2006 14:06:16 UTC, NotesNOT4Bob@attglobal.net wrote:

    > In message - "Tom Brown"
    > Thu, 17 Aug 2006 00:28:30 GMT writes:
    > >
    > >What you need is a router. I use a Linksys WRT54G, but have also used
    > >a BEFSR41. It goes like this:
    > >
    > >RR cable modem > router > multimple systems via ports on the back of
    > >the router.
    > >
    > >If you don't need the wireless WRT54G, there are many versions of the
    > >Linksys routers available on eBay and in stores. The router also
    > >provides a firewall, and thus more security, as well as multiple
    > >ethernet ports. On my network, I have a desktop (XP), ThinkPad (XP),
    > >2 desktops running eCS, an IBM Netfinity server, 2 networked printers,
    > >and, until recently, a Power Mac running OSX.
    > >
    > >You need to make sure that they are all set up on the same workgroup,
    > >and for the OS/2 based system, in
    > >x:\ibmlan\ibmlan.ini > srvhidden = no to make the system visible to
    > >the windoze system.
    > >
    > >HTH
    > >
    > >On Wed, 16 Aug 2006 23:39:23 UTC, NotesNOT4Bob@attglobal.net wrote:
    > >
    > >> Roadrunner cable broadband with home networking is being installed in a
    > >> couple of weeks. The primary interface will be a laptop using Windows/XP.
    > >> Is there any way that I can get my OS/2 desktop system to participate?
    > >>
    > >> Bob
    > >> (Remove "NOT" from E-mail address before using)
    > >>

    > >
    > >
    > >--
    > >Tom Brown, Catherder

    >
    > Tom,
    >
    > Thanks for the great help. I am beginning to get an idea of how it
    > will work, but I do not know what software or hardware I need.
    >
    > I have a WRT54GS router which I surmised from the writeup I would need
    > to have home networking. I picked it because it seemed to have the
    > most things I think I will need. It would appear, however, that I need
    > something on my desktop.
    >
    > I have a telephone modem in my computer which I will no longer need,
    > and RR says all I need is a USB port (of which I have plenty), but I
    > do not see how that will give me home networking. I suspect I need to
    > add something to my desktop to allow home networking.
    >
    > Additionally, I evidently need some hardware attachment or card to
    > allow OS/2 to use the network, and that is the number one desire.
    > However, I do not know what to get.
    >
    > You mention "x:\ibmlan\ibmlan.ini > srvhidden = no to make the system
    > visible to the windoze system" but I do not have an IMBLAN directory.
    > Do I need to install some software from my IBM installation disks?
    >
    > Sorry if I sound clueless, but I am.
    >
    > Bob
    >



    --
    Tom Brown, Catherder

  10. Re: Roadrunner & OS/2?

    In article <44e5ca6a@kcnews03>, NotesNOT4Bob@attglobal.net wrote:
    >Don,
    >
    >Thanks, but I haven't the foggest idea how to "configure TCP/IP" on
    >the Eithernet adapter. I do not have an eithernet card on my desktop.
    >(I don't think I do -- how would I know?) What is DHCP and DHCP addressing?
    >
    >I don't know what the RR host site is, yet, but I will post when I find
    >out.


    Sounds like you'd be better off paying someone to come in and do it for you.
    The hard part would be to find someone local who understands OS/2.

    Let's start with the connection: Cable and ADSL modems can come with either
    USB or Ethernet connections to the local PC(s). From your original post,
    "Roadrunner cable broadband with home networking" implies a connection with
    Ethernet ports. There will be an Ethernet port on the laptop from which a
    cable will run to an identical port on the cable box. You'll need one of
    those ports on your desktop machine to connect to another of the ports on
    the cable modem/router. The port looks like a phone port but larger, it has
    8 connections in it instead of 4. There will likely be a small logo next to
    the port that looks like a line with tiny boxes branching off it along each
    side. If you haven't got such a port, you'll need to buy an Ethernet card
    that has OS/2 drivers (not easy) and install it.

    At this stage, you might want to use Google to search around for articles
    describing the basics of Ehternet networking and bring your knowledge level
    up a bit. When the cable connection is actauly installed, you'll be better
    able to describe what you've got so we can advise you what step to take
    next.

    --
    Don Hills (dmhills at attglobaldotnet) Wellington, New Zealand
    "New interface closely resembles Presentation Manager,
    preparing you for the wonders of OS/2!"
    -- Advertisement on the box for Microsoft Windows 2.11 for 286

  11. Re: Roadrunner & OS/2?

    Tom,

    I have, to the best of my knowledge, OS/2 Warp 4 with the latest (and
    I guess the final) fixes. I have installed the 4.52, and as far as I
    know, there are no fixes beyond that. I think that the only code
    from IBM that I have added has been print drivers.

    According to the specs that RR provided, RR can be installed using a
    free USB or an Ethernet card with an RJ45 connector. It appears from
    what you write that I should buy and install the Ethernet card with
    this specified connector. RR has not installed yet, and I assume
    that they should not care before they get here.

    Can I install the networking part of OS/2 without redoing the whole
    OS/2 generation. That would be a real chore, and I would not want
    to do unless absolutely necessary.

    What is NIC and what is an NIC setup? Since I understand that RR
    will provide a dynamic IP address, will this NIC setup take care of
    that?

    Sorry for the additional questions. You have explained a lot, and
    it has been very, very helpful. I really appreciate it.

    In message - "Tom Brown"
    writes:
    >
    >With the WRT54GS, all you need is a NIC set up to get it's IP address
    >via DHCP from the router. You need to tell your cable company that you
    >need an external cable modem with an Ethernet interface, NOT USB! A
    >revised setup looks like:
    >
    >Cable > RR cable modem > router > computers
    >
    >Again, there should be NO USB involved. My RR cable modem is a
    >Motorola SURFboard model SB5100. This was a replacement for some
    >earlier model sometime in the past year or two.
    >
    >It sounds like you did not install the networking part of OS/2. I
    >don't see that you have told us what flavor of OS/2 you are running.
    >That will make some difference in further advice that can be offered.
    >Warp4? eCS (1.0, 1.1, 1.2, etc.)? Essentially you need to add
    >networking support from your installation CD. Let us know where you
    >started from, and we can tell you which way to proceed.
    >
    >HTH
    >
    >On Fri, 18 Aug 2006 14:06:16 UTC, NotesNOT4Bob@attglobal.net wrote:
    >
    >> In message - "Tom Brown"
    >> Thu, 17 Aug 2006 00:28:30 GMT writes:
    >> >
    >> >What you need is a router. I use a Linksys WRT54G, but have also used
    >> >a BEFSR41. It goes like this:
    >> >
    >> >RR cable modem > router > multimple systems via ports on the back of
    >> >the router.
    >> >
    >> >If you don't need the wireless WRT54G, there are many versions of the
    >> >Linksys routers available on eBay and in stores. The router also
    >> >provides a firewall, and thus more security, as well as multiple
    >> >ethernet ports. On my network, I have a desktop (XP), ThinkPad (XP),
    >> >2 desktops running eCS, an IBM Netfinity server, 2 networked printers,
    >> >and, until recently, a Power Mac running OSX.
    >> >
    >> >You need to make sure that they are all set up on the same workgroup,
    >> >and for the OS/2 based system, in
    >> >x:\ibmlan\ibmlan.ini > srvhidden = no to make the system visible to
    >> >the windoze system.
    >> >
    >> >HTH
    >> >
    >> >On Wed, 16 Aug 2006 23:39:23 UTC, NotesNOT4Bob@attglobal.net wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> Roadrunner cable broadband with home networking is being installed in a
    >> >> couple of weeks. The primary interface will be a laptop using Windows/XP.
    >> >> Is there any way that I can get my OS/2 desktop system to participate?
    >> >>
    >> >> Bob
    >> >> (Remove "NOT" from E-mail address before using)
    >> >>
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >--
    >> >Tom Brown, Catherder

    >>
    >> Tom,
    >>
    >> Thanks for the great help. I am beginning to get an idea of how it
    >> will work, but I do not know what software or hardware I need.
    >>
    >> I have a WRT54GS router which I surmised from the writeup I would need
    >> to have home networking. I picked it because it seemed to have the
    >> most things I think I will need. It would appear, however, that I need
    >> something on my desktop.
    >>
    >> I have a telephone modem in my computer which I will no longer need,
    >> and RR says all I need is a USB port (of which I have plenty), but I
    >> do not see how that will give me home networking. I suspect I need to
    >> add something to my desktop to allow home networking.
    >>
    >> Additionally, I evidently need some hardware attachment or card to
    >> allow OS/2 to use the network, and that is the number one desire.
    >> However, I do not know what to get.
    >>
    >> You mention "x:\ibmlan\ibmlan.ini > srvhidden = no to make the system
    >> visible to the windoze system" but I do not have an IMBLAN directory.
    >> Do I need to install some software from my IBM installation disks?
    >>
    >> Sorry if I sound clueless, but I am.
    >>
    >> Bob
    >>

    >
    >
    >--
    >Tom Brown, Catherder




    Bob
    (Remove "NOT" from E-mail address before using)


  12. Re: Roadrunner & OS/2?

    Don,

    After reading the posts here, I am getting an Eithernet card and
    installing it on my desktop. The PC laptop that I am getting has
    an 802.11 WLAN card that I understand will allow it to communicate
    on the home networking system without being physically connected
    to the RR modem. Hopefully the WRT54G box will provide this link,
    and if not, I will have to find out what to do. The PC must, as a
    requirement, be able to run from anywhere in the house. Since it
    will be a pure Windows/XP system (well, maybe I will install OS/2,
    too, but that will be for me), there are enough experts around to
    help me with that. It is my OS/2 system that I am trying to get
    up and running on the net when the time comes. The desktop has
    the Window/XP system install, too, and that has to work also, but
    it is, and hopefully will remain, an OS/2 system that is up and
    running most of the time.

    What is an "ADSL" modem? Is this what RR will probably provide,
    or should I think of getting one. If so, where would it fit in
    the network?

    I have tried to surf the net for some understanding, but with the
    slow telephone lines, surfing is not exactly a quick job.

    Thanks for taking time to give me help.

    In message - black.hole.4.spam@gmail.com
    (Don Hills) writes:
    >
    >In article <44e5ca6a@kcnews03>, NotesNOT4Bob@attglobal.net wrote:
    >>Don,
    >>
    >>Thanks, but I haven't the foggest idea how to "configure TCP/IP" on
    >>the Eithernet adapter. I do not have an eithernet card on my desktop.
    >>(I don't think I do -- how would I know?) What is DHCP and DHCP addressing?
    >>
    >>I don't know what the RR host site is, yet, but I will post when I find
    >>out.

    >
    >Sounds like you'd be better off paying someone to come in and do it for you.
    >The hard part would be to find someone local who understands OS/2.
    >
    >Let's start with the connection: Cable and ADSL modems can come with either
    >USB or Ethernet connections to the local PC(s). From your original post,
    >"Roadrunner cable broadband with home networking" implies a connection with
    >Ethernet ports. There will be an Ethernet port on the laptop from which a
    >cable will run to an identical port on the cable box. You'll need one of
    >those ports on your desktop machine to connect to another of the ports on
    >the cable modem/router. The port looks like a phone port but larger, it has
    >8 connections in it instead of 4. There will likely be a small logo next to
    >the port that looks like a line with tiny boxes branching off it along each
    >side. If you haven't got such a port, you'll need to buy an Ethernet card
    >that has OS/2 drivers (not easy) and install it.
    >
    >At this stage, you might want to use Google to search around for articles
    >describing the basics of Ehternet networking and bring your knowledge level
    >up a bit. When the cable connection is actauly installed, you'll be better
    >able to describe what you've got so we can advise you what step to take
    >next.
    >
    >--
    >Don Hills (dmhills at attglobaldotnet) Wellington, New Zealand
    >"New interface closely resembles Presentation Manager,
    > preparing you for the wonders of OS/2!"
    > -- Advertisement on the box for Microsoft Windows 2.11 for 286




    Bob
    (Remove "NOT" from E-mail address before using)


  13. Re: Roadrunner & OS/2?

    In article <44e7271f@kcnews03>, NotesNOT4Bob@attglobal.net wrote:
    >Don,
    >
    >After reading the posts here, I am getting an Eithernet card and
    >installing it on my desktop. The PC laptop that I am getting has
    >an 802.11 WLAN card that I understand will allow it to communicate
    >on the home networking system without being physically connected
    >to the RR modem. Hopefully the WRT54G box will provide this link,
    >and if not, I will have to find out what to do. ...


    Having Windows running will help, as all of the hardware can be set up and
    tested under Windows. The Linksys router (WRT54G) has Ethernet cable ports
    as well as the wireless connection. OS/2's support for wireless is somewhat
    limited (not many models of adapter supported) so connection via OS/2 from
    the laptop will be unlikely. For your desktop, provide a list of the
    Ethernet cards that are available to you and hopefully someone reading this
    thread can identify one or more of them as known to work with OS/2.

    Assuming you get it all running under Windows and have an Ethernet card that
    is known to work under OS/2, we can then talk you through the software
    installation and configuration process.

    Ignore what I said about ADSL, it's a technology used to provide broadband
    over telephone lines in areas where cable TV operators do not provide
    broadband service.

    The installer will install your cable modem. This converts the cable signals
    to Ethernet.

    You can plug a single PC directly into this modem, but since you're getting
    the "home networking" option there will be a router plugged into the modem.
    The PCs in your house then connect to the router, either via Ethernet cable
    or via wireless. As well as acting as a multi-connection point, the router
    will provide NAT, DHCP and optional firewall services.

    Every addressable device in a TCP/IP network has to have an IP address.
    Your cable supplier will assign you a single IP address. If you have more
    than one PC attached, the router will perform NAT (Network Address
    Translation) for you. Data sent from any of your PCs will be changed to the
    single IP address when it is sent out, and any responses to that data will
    be changed back to the actual addresses when it comes in so it can be
    returned to the right PC. The router keeps track of which data goes where.

    The IP address of each PC connected to your router can be set manually, but
    in a large network such as a business with hundreds of PCs this can lead to
    problems if you forget which numbers you've assigned. DHCP solves this
    problem by using the DHCP server in the router to manage the addresses.
    When a PC is booted up, it transmits a special packet that requests an IP
    address. The DHCP server provides it.

    Using firewall services in the router is more reliable than trusting
    firewalls in each PC as the router cannot as easily be compromised / virus
    attacked. If you're not running anything like a web server or file sharing
    client, you can usually configure the firewall to block all traffic from
    outside that was not specifically requested by one of the PCs.

    --
    Don Hills (dmhills at attglobaldotnet) Wellington, New Zealand
    "New interface closely resembles Presentation Manager,
    preparing you for the wonders of OS/2!"
    -- Advertisement on the box for Microsoft Windows 2.11 for 286

  14. Re: Roadrunner & OS/2?

    Now that I think about it, I am interested in this also. I have a Warp
    4 system with networking installed. I have just put in a Netgear
    wireless firewall router connected to Roadrunner, and to this machine
    (winblows xp). I have a Netgear wireless "print server", which is
    supposed to be able to act as a bridge connected to my OS/2 box. The
    Netgear stuff can talk to each other fine. I can telnet from windoze to
    either box.

    The current problem I'm having (perhaps not the last) is that the
    Netgear stuff NATs the addresses. I've set Warp up to use DHCP and
    DDNS, but when I boot it asks for the *NAME* of the DDNS server for the
    domain, and RoarRunner tech support claims there isn't any. Anyhow, if
    I'm using DDNS, how would it resolve the name?

    Right now I'm trying to take this one step at a time, and I'd be happy
    to network 'doze and Warp using TCPBEUI before going farther. Do I need
    to install the additional Warp TCP/IP stuff to proceed?


  15. Re: Roadrunner & OS/2?

    On Sat, 19 Aug 2006 14:58:36 UTC, NotesNOT4Bob@attglobal.net wrote:

    > Tom,
    >
    > I have, to the best of my knowledge, OS/2 Warp 4 with the latest (and
    > I guess the final) fixes. I have installed the 4.52, and as far as I
    > know, there are no fixes beyond that. I think that the only code
    > from IBM that I have added has been print drivers.
    >
    > According to the specs that RR provided, RR can be installed using a
    > free USB or an Ethernet card with an RJ45 connector. It appears from
    > what you write that I should buy and install the Ethernet card with
    > this specified connector. RR has not installed yet, and I assume
    > that they should not care before they get here.
    >
    > Can I install the networking part of OS/2 without redoing the whole
    > OS/2 generation. That would be a real chore, and I would not want
    > to do unless absolutely necessary.
    >
    > What is NIC and what is an NIC setup? Since I understand that RR
    > will provide a dynamic IP address, will this NIC setup take care of
    > that?


    NIC = Network Interface Card, in your case an Ethernet card. There are
    also other varieties, but for your your purposes, you need an Ethernet
    card!

    > Sorry for the additional questions. You have explained a lot, and
    > it has been very, very helpful. I really appreciate it.
    >
    > In message - "Tom Brown"
    > writes:
    > >
    > >With the WRT54GS, all you need is a NIC set up to get it's IP address
    > >via DHCP from the router. You need to tell your cable company that you
    > >need an external cable modem with an Ethernet interface, NOT USB! A
    > >revised setup looks like:
    > >
    > >Cable > RR cable modem > router > computers
    > >
    > >Again, there should be NO USB involved. My RR cable modem is a
    > >Motorola SURFboard model SB5100. This was a replacement for some
    > >earlier model sometime in the past year or two.
    > >
    > >It sounds like you did not install the networking part of OS/2. I
    > >don't see that you have told us what flavor of OS/2 you are running.
    > >That will make some difference in further advice that can be offered.
    > >Warp4? eCS (1.0, 1.1, 1.2, etc.)? Essentially you need to add
    > >networking support from your installation CD. Let us know where you
    > >started from, and we can tell you which way to proceed.
    > >
    > >HTH
    > >
    > >On Fri, 18 Aug 2006 14:06:16 UTC, NotesNOT4Bob@attglobal.net wrote:
    > >
    > >> In message - "Tom Brown"
    > >> Thu, 17 Aug 2006 00:28:30 GMT writes:
    > >> >
    > >> >What you need is a router. I use a Linksys WRT54G, but have also used
    > >> >a BEFSR41. It goes like this:
    > >> >
    > >> >RR cable modem > router > multimple systems via ports on the back of
    > >> >the router.
    > >> >
    > >> >If you don't need the wireless WRT54G, there are many versions of the
    > >> >Linksys routers available on eBay and in stores. The router also
    > >> >provides a firewall, and thus more security, as well as multiple
    > >> >ethernet ports. On my network, I have a desktop (XP), ThinkPad (XP),
    > >> >2 desktops running eCS, an IBM Netfinity server, 2 networked printers,
    > >> >and, until recently, a Power Mac running OSX.
    > >> >
    > >> >You need to make sure that they are all set up on the same workgroup,
    > >> >and for the OS/2 based system, in
    > >> >x:\ibmlan\ibmlan.ini > srvhidden = no to make the system visible to
    > >> >the windoze system.
    > >> >
    > >> >HTH
    > >> >
    > >> >On Wed, 16 Aug 2006 23:39:23 UTC, NotesNOT4Bob@attglobal.net wrote:
    > >> >
    > >> >> Roadrunner cable broadband with home networking is being installed in a
    > >> >> couple of weeks. The primary interface will be a laptop using Windows/XP.
    > >> >> Is there any way that I can get my OS/2 desktop system to participate?
    > >> >>
    > >> >> Bob
    > >> >> (Remove "NOT" from E-mail address before using)
    > >> >>
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >> >--
    > >> >Tom Brown, Catherder
    > >>
    > >> Tom,
    > >>
    > >> Thanks for the great help. I am beginning to get an idea of how it
    > >> will work, but I do not know what software or hardware I need.
    > >>
    > >> I have a WRT54GS router which I surmised from the writeup I would need
    > >> to have home networking. I picked it because it seemed to have the
    > >> most things I think I will need. It would appear, however, that I need
    > >> something on my desktop.
    > >>
    > >> I have a telephone modem in my computer which I will no longer need,
    > >> and RR says all I need is a USB port (of which I have plenty), but I
    > >> do not see how that will give me home networking. I suspect I need to
    > >> add something to my desktop to allow home networking.
    > >>
    > >> Additionally, I evidently need some hardware attachment or card to
    > >> allow OS/2 to use the network, and that is the number one desire.
    > >> However, I do not know what to get.
    > >>
    > >> You mention "x:\ibmlan\ibmlan.ini > srvhidden = no to make the system
    > >> visible to the windoze system" but I do not have an IMBLAN directory.
    > >> Do I need to install some software from my IBM installation disks?
    > >>
    > >> Sorry if I sound clueless, but I am.
    > >>
    > >> Bob
    > >>

    > >
    > >
    > >--
    > >Tom Brown, Catherder

    >
    >
    >
    > Bob
    > (Remove "NOT" from E-mail address before using)
    >



    --
    Tom Brown, Catherder

  16. Re: Roadrunner & OS/2?

    Google: OS/2 Networking

    One of the hits is a tutorial on WiFi and OS/2:
    http://www.os2warp.be/index2.php?name=wifi

    There is a good tutorial on OS/2 networking which I can't seem to
    find just now, but I will look some more tomorrow.


    On Thu, 17 Aug 2006 00:28:30 UTC, "Tom Brown"
    wrote:

    > What you need is a router. I use a Linksys WRT54G, but have also used
    > a BEFSR41. It goes like this:
    >
    > RR cable modem > router > multimple systems via ports on the back of
    > the router.
    >
    > If you don't need the wireless WRT54G, there are many versions of the
    > Linksys routers available on eBay and in stores. The router also
    > provides a firewall, and thus more security, as well as multiple
    > ethernet ports. On my network, I have a desktop (XP), ThinkPad (XP),
    > 2 desktops running eCS, an IBM Netfinity server, 2 networked printers,
    > and, until recently, a Power Mac running OSX.
    >
    > You need to make sure that they are all set up on the same workgroup,
    > and for the OS/2 based system, in
    > x:\ibmlan\ibmlan.ini > srvhidden = no to make the system visible to
    > the windoze system.
    >
    > HTH
    >
    > On Wed, 16 Aug 2006 23:39:23 UTC, NotesNOT4Bob@attglobal.net wrote:
    >
    > > Roadrunner cable broadband with home networking is being installed in a
    > > couple of weeks. The primary interface will be a laptop using Windows/XP.
    > > Is there any way that I can get my OS/2 desktop system to participate?
    > >
    > > Bob
    > > (Remove "NOT" from E-mail address before using)
    > >

    >
    >



    --
    Tom Brown, Catherder

  17. Re: Roadrunner & OS/2?

    On Sat, 19 Aug 2006 20:53:57 UTC Peter Flass
    wrote:

    > Now that I think about it, I am interested in this also. I have a Warp
    > 4 system with networking installed. I have just put in a Netgear
    > wireless firewall router connected to Roadrunner, and to this machine
    > (winblows xp). I have a Netgear wireless "print server", which is
    > supposed to be able to act as a bridge connected to my OS/2 box. The
    > Netgear stuff can talk to each other fine. I can telnet from windoze to
    > either box.
    >
    > The current problem I'm having (perhaps not the last) is that the
    > Netgear stuff NATs the addresses. I've set Warp up to use DHCP and
    > DDNS, but when I boot it asks for the *NAME* of the DDNS server for the
    > domain, and RoarRunner tech support claims there isn't any. Anyhow, if
    > I'm using DDNS, how would it resolve the name?
    >
    > Right now I'm trying to take this one step at a time, and I'd be happy
    > to network 'doze and Warp using TCPBEUI before going farther. Do I need
    > to install the additional Warp TCP/IP stuff to proceed?


    The DDNS name is a red herring. The IP should be supplied by the DHCP
    server. I just set up a Netgear router/AP for my son and the RR modem
    took care of all the negotiation upsteam and was perfectly happy to
    assign all the settings to the Netgear which in turn passed them on to
    the rest of the system downstream. I have seen a few instances where
    this wasn't exactly true, but they were all back in the SLOW telephone
    modem days when DHCP was jsut a pipe dream.

    --
    Will Honea

  18. Re: Roadrunner & OS/2?

    In message - "Tom Brown"
    writes:
    >
    >Google: OS/2 Networking
    >
    >One of the hits is a tutorial on WiFi and OS/2:
    >http://www.os2warp.be/index2.php?name=wifi


    Tom, Many thanks. It appears to answer just about all my
    questions. It may take me awhile to understand some of the
    technical jargon and digest it all, but at least I am
    beginning to understand.

    >
    >--
    >Tom Brown, Catherder


    Bob
    (Remove "NOT" from E-mail address before using)


  19. Re: Roadrunner & OS/2?

    In message - "Tom Brown"
    writes:
    >
    >Again, there should be NO USB involved. My RR cable modem is a
    >Motorola SURFboard model SB5100. This was a replacement for some
    >earlier model sometime in the past year or two.
    >
    >It sounds like you did not install the networking part of OS/2. I
    >don't see that you have told us what flavor of OS/2 you are running.
    >That will make some difference in further advice that can be offered.
    >Warp4? eCS (1.0, 1.1, 1.2, etc.)? Essentially you need to add
    >networking support from your installation CD. Let us know where you
    >started from, and we can tell you which way to proceed.
    >
    >


    I have added an ethernet card and LinkSys router. From my reading of
    the documentation, it appears that I have setup everything as far as
    I can before RR is installed.

    Physically I believe I have everything I need to setup for RR. I am
    pretty sure that it will work with Windows/XP. In any case, how do I
    add networking support to my OS/2 system? I tried doing a "Selective
    Install for Networking" using my installation CD, but that bombs off
    with an error 3 (whatevr that is), and I have to restore my desktop.

    I have a program "TCP/IP Configuration (Local)" that, when invoked,
    brings up a TCP/IP Configuration Notebook. This appears to want to
    configure LAN networks, but I don't understand the questions enough
    to check the boxes or know if this is what I want. I suspect that
    this is for when I have LAN already installed, and from what you said,
    it appears I do not.

    As I mentioned, I am on Warp4 with the latest fixes.

    Please, how do I add LAN?

    Thanks.

    Bob
    (Remove "NOT" from E-mail address before using)


  20. Re: Roadrunner & OS/2?

    On Sat, 26 Aug 2006 13:33:06 UTC, NotesNOT4Bob@attglobal.net wrote:

    -> I have added an ethernet card and LinkSys router. From my reading of
    -> the documentation, it appears that I have setup everything as far as
    -> I can before RR is installed.
    ->
    -> Physically I believe I have everything I need to setup for RR. I am
    -> pretty sure that it will work with Windows/XP. In any case, how do I
    -> add networking support to my OS/2 system? I tried doing a "Selective
    -> Install for Networking" using my installation CD, but that bombs off
    -> with an error 3 (whatevr that is), and I have to restore my desktop.
    ->
    -> I have a program "TCP/IP Configuration (Local)" that, when invoked,
    -> brings up a TCP/IP Configuration Notebook. This appears to want to
    -> configure LAN networks, but I don't understand the questions enough
    -> to check the boxes or know if this is what I want. I suspect that
    -> this is for when I have LAN already installed, and from what you said,
    -> it appears I do not.
    ->
    -> As I mentioned, I am on Warp4 with the latest fixes.
    ->
    -> Please, how do I add LAN?
    ->

    Unless you need to access windows shares you don't need LAN (also
    called peer, NetBeui and NetBIOS) networking. That has nothing to do
    with the internet. With Warp 4 you should have everything already
    that is required for TCP/IP (internet) networking. Best to have the
    latest TCP/IP updates (these are separate from system fixpacks). Even
    better to have eComStation 1.2 which has all the latest updates
    incorporated into it. I only mention this because early versions of
    DHCP client in OS/2 were buggy. Since you obviously have dialup
    internet access you already have TCP/IP installed.

    The Linksys router connected to your cable modem will provide all your
    systems with an assigned IP address either via DHCP (automatic
    assignment) or if you assign a static IP address (this is more
    complicated and will require you to set a Domain Name Server and a
    default router (the ip address of the Linksys router) in the
    appropriate location in the TCP/IP Configuartion notebook). Either is
    configured on OS/2 via TCP/IP Configuration notebook (tcpcfg2 at the
    command prompt).

    Before you do that though go into "Adapters and Protocols" object
    which depending on your version of OS/2 may be under networking in the
    "System Setup" folder (or type MPTS at the OS/2 command prompt) and
    make sure you have the correct adapter installed. If you haven't done
    this before it will probably have "No Network Adapter" in the current
    configuration. Just select the correct Network Adapter from the list
    and click "Change" to replace the "No Network Adapter". Then add the
    "IBM TCP/IP" protocol under that. Make sure the number to the left of
    "IBM TCP/IP" is "0".

    Then in the TCP/IP Configuration notebook configure 'LAN INTERFACE 0".
    Check off "Enable Interface". The easiest way for someone who has no
    idea what they are doing is to enable "automatically Using DHCP" and
    ignore all the other options. This assumes that you have enabled DHCP
    assignment in the Linksys router.

    Mark

    --
    From the eComStation of Mark Dodel

    http://www.os2voice.org
    Warpstock 2006, Windsor, Ontario, Canada, Oct 12-15, 2006 -
    http://www.warpstock.org

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