Roadrunner & OS/2? - OS2

This is a discussion on Roadrunner & OS/2? - OS2 ; In message - "Mark Dodel" writes: > >On Sat, 26 Aug 2006 13:33:06 UTC, NotesNOT4Bob@attglobal.net wrote: > >-> I have added an ethernet card and LinkSys router. From my reading of >-> the documentation, it appears that I have setup ...

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Thread: Roadrunner & OS/2?

  1. Re: Roadrunner & OS/2?

    In message - "Mark Dodel"
    writes:
    >
    >On Sat, 26 Aug 2006 13:33:06 UTC, NotesNOT4Bob@attglobal.net wrote:
    >
    >-> I have added an ethernet card and LinkSys router. From my reading of
    >-> the documentation, it appears that I have setup everything as far as
    >-> I can before RR is installed.
    >->
    >-> Physically I believe I have everything I need to setup for RR. I am
    >-> pretty sure that it will work with Windows/XP. In any case, how do I
    >-> add networking support to my OS/2 system? I tried doing a "Selective
    >-> Install for Networking" using my installation CD, but that bombs off
    >-> with an error 3 (whatevr that is), and I have to restore my desktop.
    >->
    >-> I have a program "TCP/IP Configuration (Local)" that, when invoked,
    >-> brings up a TCP/IP Configuration Notebook. This appears to want to
    >-> configure LAN networks, but I don't understand the questions enough
    >-> to check the boxes or know if this is what I want. I suspect that
    >-> this is for when I have LAN already installed, and from what you said,
    >-> it appears I do not.
    >->
    >-> As I mentioned, I am on Warp4 with the latest fixes.
    >->
    >-> Please, how do I add LAN?
    >->
    >
    >Unless you need to access windows shares you don't need LAN (also
    >called peer, NetBeui and NetBIOS) networking. That has nothing to do
    >with the internet. With Warp 4 you should have everything already
    >that is required for TCP/IP (internet) networking. Best to have the
    >latest TCP/IP updates (these are separate from system fixpacks). Even
    >better to have eComStation 1.2 which has all the latest updates
    >incorporated into it. I only mention this because early versions of
    >DHCP client in OS/2 were buggy. Since you obviously have dialup
    >internet access you already have TCP/IP installed.
    >
    >The Linksys router connected to your cable modem will provide all your
    >systems with an assigned IP address either via DHCP (automatic
    >assignment) or if you assign a static IP address (this is more
    >complicated and will require you to set a Domain Name Server and a
    >default router (the ip address of the Linksys router) in the
    >appropriate location in the TCP/IP Configuartion notebook). Either is
    >configured on OS/2 via TCP/IP Configuration notebook (tcpcfg2 at the
    >command prompt).
    >
    >Before you do that though go into "Adapters and Protocols" object
    >which depending on your version of OS/2 may be under networking in the
    >"System Setup" folder (or type MPTS at the OS/2 command prompt) and
    >make sure you have the correct adapter installed. If you haven't done
    >this before it will probably have "No Network Adapter" in the current
    >configuration. Just select the correct Network Adapter from the list
    >and click "Change" to replace the "No Network Adapter". Then add the
    >"IBM TCP/IP" protocol under that. Make sure the number to the left of
    >"IBM TCP/IP" is "0".
    >
    >Then in the TCP/IP Configuration notebook configure 'LAN INTERFACE 0".
    > Check off "Enable Interface". The easiest way for someone who has no
    >idea what they are doing is to enable "automatically Using DHCP" and
    >ignore all the other options. This assumes that you have enabled DHCP
    >assignment in the Linksys router.
    >
    >Mark
    >
    >--
    >From the eComStation of Mark Dodel
    >
    > http://www.os2voice.org
    > Warpstock 2006, Windsor, Ontario, Canada, Oct 12-15, 2006 -
    >http://www.warpstock.org


    Mark,

    Thanks. That was great. However, I have not installed the adapter, yet.

    When I went to MPTS I was able to see what you were describing, but the
    EXACT same adapter was not in the list. My Ethernet adapter is:

    10/100 EtherFast PCI Adapter by LinkSys.

    The closest thing I could find in the MPTS list was:

    IBM 10/100 EtherjeT PCI Adapter (OS/2)

    Do I need to install some kind of updated adapter list (and if so,
    where do I find it), or can I use the "Etherjet" adapter. Other than
    this, everything you described was there, and all I need is to be sure
    that I use or specify the right adapter.

    Thanks for the great help.

    Bob
    (Remove "NOT" from E-mail address before using)


  2. Re: Roadrunner & OS/2?

    NotesNOT4Bob@attglobal.net wrote:
    > In message - "Mark Dodel"
    > writes:
    >
    >> On Sat, 26 Aug 2006 13:33:06 UTC, NotesNOT4Bob@attglobal.net wrote:
    >>
    >> -> I have added an ethernet card and LinkSys router. From my reading of
    >> -> the documentation, it appears that I have setup everything as far as
    >> -> I can before RR is installed.
    >> ->
    >> -> Physically I believe I have everything I need to setup for RR. I am
    >> -> pretty sure that it will work with Windows/XP. In any case, how do I
    >> -> add networking support to my OS/2 system? I tried doing a "Selective
    >> -> Install for Networking" using my installation CD, but that bombs off
    >> -> with an error 3 (whatevr that is), and I have to restore my desktop.
    >> ->
    >> -> I have a program "TCP/IP Configuration (Local)" that, when invoked,
    >> -> brings up a TCP/IP Configuration Notebook. This appears to want to
    >> -> configure LAN networks, but I don't understand the questions enough
    >> -> to check the boxes or know if this is what I want. I suspect that
    >> -> this is for when I have LAN already installed, and from what you said,
    >> -> it appears I do not.
    >> ->
    >> -> As I mentioned, I am on Warp4 with the latest fixes.
    >> ->
    >> -> Please, how do I add LAN?
    >> ->
    >>
    >> Unless you need to access windows shares you don't need LAN (also
    >> called peer, NetBeui and NetBIOS) networking. That has nothing to do
    >> with the internet. With Warp 4 you should have everything already
    >> that is required for TCP/IP (internet) networking. Best to have the
    >> latest TCP/IP updates (these are separate from system fixpacks). Even
    >> better to have eComStation 1.2 which has all the latest updates
    >> incorporated into it. I only mention this because early versions of
    >> DHCP client in OS/2 were buggy. Since you obviously have dialup
    >> internet access you already have TCP/IP installed.
    >>
    >> The Linksys router connected to your cable modem will provide all your
    >> systems with an assigned IP address either via DHCP (automatic
    >> assignment) or if you assign a static IP address (this is more
    >> complicated and will require you to set a Domain Name Server and a
    >> default router (the ip address of the Linksys router) in the
    >> appropriate location in the TCP/IP Configuartion notebook). Either is
    >> configured on OS/2 via TCP/IP Configuration notebook (tcpcfg2 at the
    >> command prompt).
    >>
    >> Before you do that though go into "Adapters and Protocols" object
    >> which depending on your version of OS/2 may be under networking in the
    >> "System Setup" folder (or type MPTS at the OS/2 command prompt) and
    >> make sure you have the correct adapter installed. If you haven't done
    >> this before it will probably have "No Network Adapter" in the current
    >> configuration. Just select the correct Network Adapter from the list
    >> and click "Change" to replace the "No Network Adapter". Then add the
    >> "IBM TCP/IP" protocol under that. Make sure the number to the left of
    >> "IBM TCP/IP" is "0".
    >>
    >> Then in the TCP/IP Configuration notebook configure 'LAN INTERFACE 0".
    >> Check off "Enable Interface". The easiest way for someone who has no
    >> idea what they are doing is to enable "automatically Using DHCP" and
    >> ignore all the other options. This assumes that you have enabled DHCP
    >> assignment in the Linksys router.
    >>
    >> Mark
    >>
    >> --
    >>
    > >From the eComStation of Mark Dodel

    >
    >> http://www.os2voice.org
    >> Warpstock 2006, Windsor, Ontario, Canada, Oct 12-15, 2006 -
    >> http://www.warpstock.org
    >>

    >
    > Mark,
    >
    > Thanks. That was great. However, I have not installed the adapter, yet.
    >
    > When I went to MPTS I was able to see what you were describing, but the
    > EXACT same adapter was not in the list. My Ethernet adapter is:
    >
    > 10/100 EtherFast PCI Adapter by LinkSys.
    >
    > The closest thing I could find in the MPTS list was:
    >
    > IBM 10/100 EtherjeT PCI Adapter (OS/2)
    >
    > Do I need to install some kind of updated adapter list (and if so,
    > where do I find it), or can I use the "Etherjet" adapter. Other than
    > this, everything you described was there, and all I need is to be sure
    > that I use or specify the right adapter.
    >
    > Thanks for the great help.
    >
    > Bob
    > (Remove "NOT" from E-mail address before using)
    >
    >

    You might save yourself many headaches at the cost of a few dollars by
    getting an Intel PRO/100 S or PRO/1000 MT Desktop Adapter. There are
    OS/2 drivers for both. The drivers are included on the CD that comes
    with the adapter, and they are available from Intel's Web Site. The
    PRO/1000 MT cost me $69.99 at the beginning of 2005. I believe the
    PRO/100 S was cheaper, but I don't have a price tag on that box. Your
    ISP probably won't offer you gigabit access, so the PRO/100 S would suffice.

    That was the advice I was given when I went fro dial-up to high speed
    Internet access, and I found it to make the change smooth and easy.

  3. Re: Roadrunner & OS/2?

    On Mon, 28 Aug 2006 02:20:15 UTC, NotesNOT4Bob@attglobal.net wrote:

    -> In message - "Mark Dodel"
    -> writes:
    -> >
    -> >On Sat, 26 Aug 2006 13:33:06 UTC, NotesNOT4Bob@attglobal.net wrote:
    -> >
    -> >-> I have added an ethernet card and LinkSys router. From my reading of
    -> >-> the documentation, it appears that I have setup everything as far as
    -> >-> I can before RR is installed.
    -> >->
    -> >-> Physically I believe I have everything I need to setup for RR. I am
    -> >-> pretty sure that it will work with Windows/XP. In any case, how do I
    -> >-> add networking support to my OS/2 system? I tried doing a "Selective
    -> >-> Install for Networking" using my installation CD, but that bombs off
    -> >-> with an error 3 (whatevr that is), and I have to restore my desktop.
    -> >->
    -> >-> I have a program "TCP/IP Configuration (Local)" that, when invoked,
    -> >-> brings up a TCP/IP Configuration Notebook. This appears to want to
    -> >-> configure LAN networks, but I don't understand the questions enough
    -> >-> to check the boxes or know if this is what I want. I suspect that
    -> >-> this is for when I have LAN already installed, and from what you said,
    -> >-> it appears I do not.
    -> >->
    -> >-> As I mentioned, I am on Warp4 with the latest fixes.
    -> >->
    -> >-> Please, how do I add LAN?
    -> >->
    -> >
    -> >Unless you need to access windows shares you don't need LAN (also
    -> >called peer, NetBeui and NetBIOS) networking. That has nothing to do
    -> >with the internet. With Warp 4 you should have everything already
    -> >that is required for TCP/IP (internet) networking. Best to have the
    -> >latest TCP/IP updates (these are separate from system fixpacks). Even
    -> >better to have eComStation 1.2 which has all the latest updates
    -> >incorporated into it. I only mention this because early versions of
    -> >DHCP client in OS/2 were buggy. Since you obviously have dialup
    -> >internet access you already have TCP/IP installed.
    -> >
    -> >The Linksys router connected to your cable modem will provide all your
    -> >systems with an assigned IP address either via DHCP (automatic
    -> >assignment) or if you assign a static IP address (this is more
    -> >complicated and will require you to set a Domain Name Server and a
    -> >default router (the ip address of the Linksys router) in the
    -> >appropriate location in the TCP/IP Configuartion notebook). Either is
    -> >configured on OS/2 via TCP/IP Configuration notebook (tcpcfg2 at the
    -> >command prompt).
    -> >
    -> >Before you do that though go into "Adapters and Protocols" object
    -> >which depending on your version of OS/2 may be under networking in the
    -> >"System Setup" folder (or type MPTS at the OS/2 command prompt) and
    -> >make sure you have the correct adapter installed. If you haven't done
    -> >this before it will probably have "No Network Adapter" in the current
    -> >configuration. Just select the correct Network Adapter from the list
    -> >and click "Change" to replace the "No Network Adapter". Then add the
    -> >"IBM TCP/IP" protocol under that. Make sure the number to the left of
    -> >"IBM TCP/IP" is "0".
    -> >
    -> >Then in the TCP/IP Configuration notebook configure 'LAN INTERFACE 0".
    -> > Check off "Enable Interface". The easiest way for someone who has no
    -> >idea what they are doing is to enable "automatically Using DHCP" and
    -> >ignore all the other options. This assumes that you have enabled DHCP
    -> >assignment in the Linksys router.
    -> >
    -> >Mark
    -> >
    -> >--
    -> >From the eComStation of Mark Dodel
    -> >
    -> > http://www.os2voice.org
    -> > Warpstock 2006, Windsor, Ontario, Canada, Oct 12-15, 2006 -
    -> >http://www.warpstock.org
    ->
    -> Mark,
    ->
    -> Thanks. That was great. However, I have not installed the adapter, yet.
    ->
    -> When I went to MPTS I was able to see what you were describing, but the
    -> EXACT same adapter was not in the list. My Ethernet adapter is:
    ->
    -> 10/100 EtherFast PCI Adapter by LinkSys.
    ->
    -> The closest thing I could find in the MPTS list was:
    ->
    -> IBM 10/100 EtherjeT PCI Adapter (OS/2)
    ->
    -> Do I need to install some kind of updated adapter list (and if so,
    -> where do I find it), or can I use the "Etherjet" adapter. Other than
    -> this, everything you described was there, and all I need is to be sure
    -> that I use or specify the right adapter.
    ->
    -> Thanks for the great help.

    You need to know if the Linksys Network Adapter has an OS/2 driver.
    Is there an installation CD? If so look for either an OS2 directory
    or NDIS directory on it. You can then point MPTS to that directory to
    install the driver to the list using the "Other Adapters" button.

    On http://www.os2warp.be/index2.php?name=nicpak there is a listing for
    a "Linksys LNE100TX Fast Ethernet Adapter(V2)+" but I have no idea if
    that is the same as yours. There is a driver listed on that page for
    that adapter. With a company like Linksys though two adapters with the
    exact same model name could have a different chipset and won't work
    with the same driver. See that page for a fairly comprehensive list
    of adapters supported under OS/2.

    Mark




    --
    From the eComStation of Mark Dodel

    http://www.os2voice.org
    Warpstock 2006, Windsor, Ontario, Canada, Oct 12-15, 2006 -
    http://www.warpstock.org

  4. Re: Roadrunner & OS/2?

    Colin Campbell wrote:
    >
    > You might save yourself many headaches at the cost of a few dollars by
    > getting an Intel PRO/100 S or PRO/1000 MT Desktop Adapter. There are
    > OS/2 drivers for both. The drivers are included on the CD that comes
    > with the adapter, and they are available from Intel's Web Site. The
    > PRO/1000 MT cost me $69.99 at the beginning of 2005. I believe the
    > PRO/100 S was cheaper, but I don't have a price tag on that box. Your
    > ISP probably won't offer you gigabit access, so the PRO/100 S would
    > suffice.


    A lot of computer repair places and such have bins of used adapters for
    $10 or less that would probably include the Intel drivers. Obviously
    they don't come with software, but windoze drivers would be useless in
    any case.


  5. Re: Roadrunner & OS/2?

    On Sat, 26 Aug 2006 20:16:04 -0500, Mark Dodel wrote:
    > -> I have a program "TCP/IP Configuration (Local)" that, when invoked,
    > -> brings up a TCP/IP Configuration Notebook. This appears to want to
    > -> configure LAN networks, but I don't understand the questions enough
    > -> to check the boxes or know if this is what I want. I suspect that
    > -> this is for when I have LAN already installed, and from what you said,
    > -> it appears I do not.
    > ->
    > -> As I mentioned, I am on Warp4 with the latest fixes.
    > -> Please, how do I add LAN?
    >
    > Unless you need to access windows shares you don't need LAN (also
    > called peer, NetBeui and NetBIOS) networking. That has nothing to do
    > with the internet.


    Please don't confuse the terminology (more than IBM already has, anyway).
    In the context he's using it, "LAN" refers to the network topology, not
    the software protocols.

    In other words, he's setting up a TCP/IP Internet LAN, and that's what
    he's asking how to do. This has nothing to do with what is imprecisely
    called "LAN-style networking" (LAN Requester/LAN Server), which actually
    refers to a SMB file/print sharing LAN.

    To answer the OP's question, enabling Internet access involves two phases:
    1) Install a driver for the Ethernet adapter using the "Adapters and
    Protocol Services" (MPTS) program, and then enable the TCP/IP protocol
    on that interface.
    2) Configure the TCP/IP settings using the "TCP/IP Configuration (Local)"
    (TCPCFG2) program.
    Mark's given you most of the details you need to be starting with.

    --
    Alex Taylor
    http://www.cs-club.org/~alex

    Remove hat to reply (reply-to address).

  6. Re: Roadrunner & OS/2?

    On 08/27/06 10:20 pm NotesNOT4Bob@attglobal.net wrote:

    > Thanks. That was great. However, I have not installed the adapter, yet.
    >
    > When I went to MPTS I was able to see what you were describing, but the
    > EXACT same adapter was not in the list. My Ethernet adapter is:
    >
    > 10/100 EtherFast PCI Adapter by LinkSys.
    >
    > The closest thing I could find in the MPTS list was:
    >
    > IBM 10/100 EtherjeT PCI Adapter (OS/2)
    >
    > Do I need to install some kind of updated adapter list (and if so,
    > where do I find it), or can I use the "Etherjet" adapter. Other than
    > this, everything you described was there, and all I need is to be sure
    > that I use or specify the right adapter.
    >
    > Thanks for the great help.


    I have used Linksys network cards (LNE100TX) with success, BUT the
    alleged OS/2 drivers that came with some of the more recent versions of
    the cards were designed for an earlier version of the card using a
    different chip.

    For a while the drivers were on the chip manufacturer's site (ADMTek),
    but they weren't there the last time I looked.

    The files here:

    http://tvdir.com/support/nic_drivers/Genica/NDIS/OS2/

    seem to be the same as I have used with Linksys cards up to and
    including ver. 5.1. I have no idea whether currently available cards use
    the same chip and work with this driver set.

    Perce

  7. Re: Roadrunner & OS/2?

    In message - "Mark Dodel"
    writes:
    >>-> >

    >-> >The Linksys router connected to your cable modem will provide all your
    >-> >systems with an assigned IP address either via DHCP (automatic
    >-> >assignment) or if you assign a static IP address (this is more
    >-> >complicated and will require you to set a Domain Name Server and a
    >-> >default router (the ip address of the Linksys router) in the
    >-> >appropriate location in the TCP/IP Configuartion notebook). Either is
    >-> >configured on OS/2 via TCP/IP Configuration notebook (tcpcfg2 at the
    >-> >command prompt).
    >-> >
    >-> >Before you do that though go into "Adapters and Protocols" object
    >-> >which depending on your version of OS/2 may be under networking in the
    >-> >"System Setup" folder (or type MPTS at the OS/2 command prompt) and
    >-> >make sure you have the correct adapter installed. If you haven't done
    >-> >this before it will probably have "No Network Adapter" in the current
    >-> >configuration. Just select the correct Network Adapter from the list
    >-> >and click "Change" to replace the "No Network Adapter". Then add the
    >-> >"IBM TCP/IP" protocol under that. Make sure the number to the left of
    >-> >"IBM TCP/IP" is "0".
    >-> >
    >-> >Then in the TCP/IP Configuration notebook configure 'LAN INTERFACE 0".
    >-> > Check off "Enable Interface". The easiest way for someone who has no
    >-> >idea what they are doing is to enable "automatically Using DHCP" and
    >-> >ignore all the other options. This assumes that you have enabled DHCP
    >-> >assignment in the Linksys router.
    >-> >
    >-> >Mark
    >-> >
    >-> >--
    >-> >From the eComStation of Mark Dodel
    >-> >
    >-> > http://www.os2voice.org
    >-> > Warpstock 2006, Windsor, Ontario, Canada, Oct 12-15, 2006 -
    >-> >http://www.warpstock.org


    >
    >You need to know if the Linksys Network Adapter has an OS/2 driver.
    >Is there an installation CD? If so look for either an OS2 directory
    >or NDIS directory on it. You can then point MPTS to that directory to
    >install the driver to the list using the "Other Adapters" button.
    >
    >On http://www.os2warp.be/index2.php?name=nicpak there is a listing for
    >a "Linksys LNE100TX Fast Ethernet Adapter(V2)+" but I have no idea if
    >that is the same as yours. There is a driver listed on that page for
    >that adapter. With a company like Linksys though two adapters with the
    >exact same model name could have a different chipset and won't work
    >with the same driver. See that page for a fairly comprehensive list
    >of adapters supported under OS/2.
    >
    >Mark
    >
    >
    >--
    >From the eComStation of Mark Dodel
    >
    > http://www.os2voice.org
    > Warpstock 2006, Windsor, Ontario, Canada, Oct 12-15, 2006 -
    >http://www.warpstock.org


    I found the code in the drivers\Ndis\OS2 directory on the supplied
    disk. I also did what you suggested by using the Network Adapters and
    protocol. Using that module, I did get the LinkSys code specified. In
    addition, I went to the TCP/IP Configuration notebook and checked the
    boxes you specified. So far, so good.

    When I rebooted, four new lines were displayed during the config.sys
    processing.

    Linksys LNE100X Fast Ethernet Adapter(LNE100TX v5) driver
    Slot (Indx) number :1
    IRQ number :0B
    Ehternet Address: 00-14-BF-5C-B2-31

    I have very little idea what this all means and, following these
    messages, the system stops. It just does nothing more, and I have to
    reboot, go to command line mode and make some changes so I can get to
    OS/2. Then, after rebooting, I reset the Network Adapter and Protocol
    values and the TCP/IP notebook configuration to their original settings
    and reboot again.

    When I boot Windows/XP on the same machine, everything works so I
    assume that mechanically, my system is okay. I may need somw TCP/IP
    fix, but I do not where to go or what to get.

    Any suggestions would be appreciated.

    Thanks.

    Bob
    (Remove "NOT" from E-mail address before using)


  8. Re: Roadrunner & OS/2?

    [A complimentary Cc of this posting was sent to

    ], who wrote in article <44f5091a@kcnews03>:
    > Linksys LNE100X Fast Ethernet Adapter(LNE100TX v5) driver
    > Slot (Indx) number :1
    > IRQ number :0B
    > Ehternet Address: 00-14-BF-5C-B2-31
    >
    > I have very little idea what this all means and, following these
    > messages, the system stops.


    Probably your driver is a wrong one. There are about 5 (?) different
    Linksys drivers. You need to pick up the correct one; there is no
    simple way to determine which one it is. Linksys changes the chipset
    used by their cards on random basis (maybe the most competitive by
    price chipset of the current month?); in some years people could tell
    you which driver to choose by the color of the box (!).

    The driver on CD is almost definitely a wrong one. The general advice
    is to avoid this mess and get a different adapter - now you know why.

    Alternatively, try

    http://pws.prserv.net/mckinnis/nicpak/

    OR: my linksys was in a blue box (IIRC), and I use FASTNIC.OS2. PCI.EXE
    reports:

    Vendor 1317h ADMtek
    Device 0985h AN983 FastNIC PCI 10/100 Fast Ethernet Adapter
    Command 0017h (I/O Access, Memory Access, BusMaster,
    MemWrite+Invalidate)
    Status 0290h (Has Capabilities List, Supports Back-To-Back Trans.,
    Medium Timin
    g)
    Revision 11h, Header Type 00h, Bus Latency A0h
    Self test 00h (Self test not supported)
    PCI Class Network, type Ethernet
    Subsystem ID 05741317h LNE100TX Fast Ethernet Adapter
    Subsystem Vendor 1317h ADMtek
    Address 0 is an I/O Port : 00008800h
    Address 1 is a Memory Address (anywhere in 0-4GiB) : DE800000h
    System IRQ 5, INT# A
    Expansion ROM of 128 KiB decoded by this card, currently disabled
    New Capabilities List Present:
    Power Management Capability, Version 1.1
    Supports low power State D1
    Supports low power State D2
    Supports PME# from mode(s) D0, D1, D2, D3hot, D3cold
    current requirement for 3.3Vaux: 100 mA
    Current Power State : D0 (Device operational, no power saving)

    Hope this helps,
    Ilya

  9. Re: Roadrunner & OS/2?

    In article <44f5091a@kcnews03>, NotesNOT4Bob@attglobal.net wrote:
    >
    > Linksys LNE100X Fast Ethernet Adapter(LNE100TX v5) driver
    > Slot (Indx) number :1
    > IRQ number :0B
    > Ehternet Address: 00-14-BF-5C-B2-31
    >
    >I have very little idea what this all means and, following these
    >messages, the system stops. ...


    Most error messages during adapter initialisation are logged in the file
    called LANTRAN.LOG, in the \IBMCOM directory. Make a copy of that file while
    you're booted to command prompt mode, because it will get overwritten on the
    next boot that tries to start a network adapter. Post the contents here.

    --
    Don Hills (dmhills at attglobaldotnet) Wellington, New Zealand
    "New interface closely resembles Presentation Manager,
    preparing you for the wonders of OS/2!"
    -- Advertisement on the box for Microsoft Windows 2.11 for 286

  10. Re: Roadrunner & OS/2?

    In message - black.hole.4.spam@gmail.com
    (Don Hills) writes:
    >
    >In article <44f5091a@kcnews03>, NotesNOT4Bob@attglobal.net wrote:
    >>
    >> Linksys LNE100X Fast Ethernet Adapter(LNE100TX v5) driver
    >> Slot (Indx) number :1
    >> IRQ number :0B
    >> Ehternet Address: 00-14-BF-5C-B2-31
    >>
    >>I have very little idea what this all means and, following these
    >>messages, the system stops. ...

    >
    >Most error messages during adapter initialisation are logged in the file
    >called LANTRAN.LOG, in the \IBMCOM directory. Make a copy of that file while
    >you're booted to command prompt mode, because it will get overwritten on the
    >next boot that tries to start a network adapter. Post the contents here.
    >
    >--
    >Don Hills (dmhills at attglobaldotnet) Wellington, New Zealand
    >"New interface closely resembles Presentation Manager,
    > preparing you for the wonders of OS/2!"
    > -- Advertisement on the box for Microsoft Windows 2.11 for 286


    How do I do that at the point that the system is hung following
    the messages I posted? The only way that I know to get to command
    line mode is to reboot and go to it using Alt-F1>PF2, but the log is
    erased, and when I get to command mode, it is zero bytes. The time
    stamp on the log file indicates that it was created by the reboot
    process.


    Bob
    (Remove "NOT" from E-mail address before using)


  11. Re: Roadrunner & OS/2?

    [A complimentary Cc of this posting was sent to

    ], who wrote in article <44f6d54f@kcnews03>:
    > >Most error messages during adapter initialisation are logged in the file
    > >called LANTRAN.LOG, in the \IBMCOM directory. Make a copy of that file while
    > >you're booted to command prompt mode, because it will get overwritten on the
    > >next boot that tries to start a network adapter. Post the contents here.


    > How do I do that at the point that the system is hung following
    > the messages I posted? The only way that I know to get to command
    > line mode is to reboot and go to it using Alt-F1>PF2, but the log is
    > erased, and when I get to command mode, it is zero bytes. The time
    > stamp on the log file indicates that it was created by the reboot
    > process.


    In order of preferences:

    a) Boot from CD;
    b) Boot from maintainance partition;
    c) Make a network-less config.Y, and add it to Alt-F1 boot menu;
    d) Boot from floppy.
    e) Same as a/b/d, but boot mini-Linux.

    Hope this helps,
    Ilya

  12. Re: Roadrunner & OS/2?

    In message - Ilya Zakharevich
    writes:
    >
    >[A complimentary Cc of this posting was sent to
    >
    >], who wrote in article <44f6d54f@kcnews03>:
    >> >Most error messages during adapter initialisation are logged in the file
    >> >called LANTRAN.LOG, in the \IBMCOM directory. Make a copy of that file while
    >> >you're booted to command prompt mode, because it will get overwritten on the
    >> >next boot that tries to start a network adapter. Post the contents here.

    >
    >> How do I do that at the point that the system is hung following
    >> the messages I posted? The only way that I know to get to command
    >> line mode is to reboot and go to it using Alt-F1>PF2, but the log is
    >> erased, and when I get to command mode, it is zero bytes. The time
    >> stamp on the log file indicates that it was created by the reboot
    >> process.

    >
    >In order of preferences:
    >
    >a) Boot from CD;
    >b) Boot from maintainance partition;
    >c) Make a network-less config.Y, and add it to Alt-F1 boot menu;
    >d) Boot from floppy.
    >e) Same as a/b/d, but boot mini-Linux.
    >
    >Hope this helps,
    >Ilya


    I booted from some diskettes I had, and that worked. However,
    the LANTRAN.LOG file was zero bytes. It was opened and had a
    time stamp of the boot that failed, but nothing was written to
    it.

    Bob
    (Remove "NOT" from E-mail address before using)


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