Seeking advice on how to make eCs and Win XP to see each other - OS2

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Thread: Seeking advice on how to make eCs and Win XP to see each other

  1. Seeking advice on how to make eCs and Win XP to see each other

    Hi, folks!

    I'm a clueless newbie reagarding networking issues.

    I has been using eComStation 1.1 and Windows XP SP2 for a while now,
    each one in its own machine. Both of them have its own modem and I use
    dial-up to connect to my ISP without any problems. Both machines have
    NICs and I bought a crossover cable and happily connected them, but
    from that point onwards I don't have the slightest idea on how to
    configure neither machine to see each other to share files between the
    two. Could anybody give me some advice on how to start? Please keep in
    mind the first statement of this posting!

    Thank you in advance!


  2. Re: Seeking advice on how to make eCs and Win XP to see each other

    MARK44 wrote:

    >Hi, folks!
    >
    >I'm a clueless newbie reagarding networking issues.
    >
    >I has been using eComStation 1.1 and Windows XP SP2 for a while now,
    >each one in its own machine. Both of them have its own modem and I use
    >dial-up to connect to my ISP without any problems. Both machines have
    >NICs and I bought a crossover cable and happily connected them, but
    >from that point onwards I don't have the slightest idea on how to
    >configure neither machine to see each other to share files between the
    >two. Could anybody give me some advice on how to start? Please keep in
    >mind the first statement of this posting!
    >
    >Thank you in advance!
    >
    >
    >

    I really can't help much with the cross-machine part of this question,
    but I believe one of your issues is how you have the two machines set up
    in terms of file systems.

    Typically, your WinXP will be on an NTFS partition, although it could be
    on a FAT32 partition. I believe that eCS requires that the OS be
    installed on an HPFS partition (or volume). Windoze in general long ago
    dropped support for the HPFS file system. OS/2 (and eCS) never had
    support for NTFS file systems.

    Someone has written a file system for OS/2 / eCS that can read NTFS file
    systems; it is easy enough to find and install, and it works, in my
    experience. However, you cannot write files from OS/2 / eCS to the NTFS
    file system, so this is a sort of one-way pipe. There is also a driver
    for the FAT file system and the FAT32 file system, and these are read /
    write capable.

    I think that WinXP only supports FAT32 natively, but there may be third
    party drivers for FAT out there in MicroSoft land (and maybe an HPFS
    driver, too, for all I know).

    What this boils down to is that to share data bidirectionally between
    the two operating systems, it is useful to have a partition (or volume)
    formatted as FAT32. You can use it as a standard place to store data
    from both systems, or you can just copy files to it for the express
    purpose of sharing them from one to the other.

    Your WinXP PC was probably sent to you with the entire hard drive
    defined as a single partition, where WinXP and all your applications and
    data get stored. If so, you will need to either reduce this partition
    in order to get some free space, or buy a second hard drive and create a
    new partition there which you define as FAT32.

    Your eCS PC may be in the same state; if so, the solution to creating a
    FAT32 volume is the same.

    If you can already "see" one PC from the other with your connection, you
    may be able to get by with a FAT32 partition or volume on one or the
    other PC, not both. Defining space on both might be more elegant and
    useful, though, since you could read and write to the local FAT32
    partition without being connected to the other PC.

    I would be careful, too, about letting Windoze "see" very much on your
    eCS machine, since Windoze is much more of a hacker target, and you
    might get parts of your eCS PC trashed by a virus, etc. Security
    settings may need to be understood and set up to minimize this danger.

    I have an older PC with Win2K Pro and eCS installed on it, and a newer
    one with WinXP Home and eCS installed. I share data using a FAT
    partition on the older PC, and using FAT32 on the newer one. I may have
    to try to connect these machines in order to move things like e-mail
    files to the newer PC. So, I'll be watching this thread to see how you
    come out!

  3. Re: Seeking advice on how to make eCs and Win XP to see each other

    On Sun, 06 Nov 2005 19:56:23 -0800, Colin Campbell wrote:

    >
    >What this boils down to is that to share data bidirectionally between
    >the two operating systems, it is useful to have a partition (or volume)
    >formatted as FAT32. You can use it as a standard place to store data
    >from both systems, or you can just copy files to it for the express
    >purpose of sharing them from one to the other.


    I think your instructions are more applicable to a multiboot system rather
    than having different os's on different machines see each other. I used to
    be able to connect to my wife's xp, copy files, etc from ecs, but after
    applying SP2 I could no longer do that.

    However, I can still copy files from her ntfs partition to my hpfs partition.
    I just can't go back & forth from ecs. One of these days I'll have time to
    sit down and get it figured out, but for now if I have to so any file sharing
    I just go to her machine and initiate it that way.

    No fat32 here.

    Rgds, Jon



  4. Re: Seeking advice on how to make eCs and Win XP to see each other

    On Mon, 7 Nov 2005 03:56:23 UTC, Colin Campbell wrote:
    Hi Mark, Colin ...

    > >I'm a clueless newbie reagarding networking issues.
    > >
    > >I has been using eComStation 1.1 and Windows XP SP2 for a while now,
    > >each one in its own machine. Both of them have its own modem and I use
    > >dial-up to connect to my ISP without any problems. Both machines have
    > >NICs and I bought a crossover cable and happily connected them, but
    > >from that point onwards I don't have the slightest idea on how to
    > >configure neither machine to see each other to share files between the
    > >two. Could anybody give me some advice on how to start? Please keep in
    > >mind the first statement of this posting!
    > >
    > >Thank you in advance!
    > >
    > >
    > >

    > I really can't help much with the cross-machine part of this question,
    > but I believe one of your issues is how you have the two machines set up
    > in terms of file systems.


    NO, that is about the only thing you NEED NOT to worry about :-)

    When accessing a filesystem over a network, it is the operating system
    at the 'serving' computer that actually handles that filesystem, the 'client'
    side of the connection only sees a generic network filesystem.

    So from any type of computer, you can access files on Windows,
    OS/2, MAC, UNIX, Linux or whatever, as long as they implement
    the same type of networking.

    The networking most often used with PC's is called SMB (Server Message Block).
    This is implemented for OS/2 in the IBM Lan Requester or PEER services,
    and it built into Windows as well, allthough they call it "CIFS" these days.
    (Common Internet File System).
    On Linux (and others) it is implemented in SAMBA.

    > Typically, your WinXP will be on an NTFS partition,


    Not relevant at all ...


    When dealing with different operating system in one network, the lower
    level of transport protocol can either use a NETBIOS interface
    (NETBIOS or NETBEUI in OS/2 or eCS, depending on where you look)
    or it can be routed over the TCP/IP protocol (called TCPBEUI or
    "Netbios over TCP/IP, depending on where you look in OS/2 or eCS).
    I think the latter is simply called "Netbios" in Windows.




    > I would be careful, too, about letting Windoze "see" very much on your
    > eCS machine, since Windoze is much more of a hacker target, and you
    > might get parts of your eCS PC trashed by a virus, etc. Security
    > settings may need to be understood and set up to minimize this danger.


    Yes, that is why it would be better, security wise, to have only one device
    access the Internet directly, and use a good firewall on that. However,
    without using a dedicated device for that (broadband modem/router)
    configuration is fairly complex, and not suited for a beginner at all ...


    All this said, I am NOT really an expert on configuring Windows and eCS
    for networking, I am sure other will chime in with better advise, but:

    - Your Windows machine has everything installed to do this.
    All you need to do is configure its network interface (for the NIC)
    to use the TCP/IP and Netbios over TCP/IP protocols.
    (I think that is called 'Windows File and Printer sharing' there :-)

    Configuration is through the Windows "Control Pannel", and then
    the networking item. It should have objects for the NIC and most
    likely the modem as well. For a small network, using a cross-over
    cable you need to configure a unique TCP/IP address there manually
    (after adding TCP/IP to the NIC, select its 'properties')

    You could use an address like 192.168.0.5 there, and a different but
    similar one like 192.168.0.10 for the other PC. The 'network mask'
    to specify with that would be 255.255.255.0

    The complications, that I am NOT familar with, lies with the modem
    connection that you also have. I expect that simply adding the NIC
    configuration lets it automatically expose your 'network shares'
    to the whole world as well (via the modem) since Windows
    defaults tend to prefer access over security :-)


    On the eCS side, you need to have the PEER services installed,
    this is a combined LAN Requester and SERVER package.
    It may or may not be installed already. I think installing it
    afterwards is not a trivial excersise :-)

    Apart from that, you need to configure the network protocols
    with a program called MPTS, which is in the System setup:

    System setup -> Network -> Adapters and Protocols

    That is where you install a driver for the NIC, and add protocols to it.
    For sharing files with Windows I would select "IBM TCP/IP"
    and "IBM OS/2 NETBIOS OVER TCP/IP"

    You configure the TCP/IP configuration itself using the program

    System setup -> Network -> TCP/IP -> TCP/IP Configuration

    Note: this is on an eCS 1.2 machine, I think it is the same on 1.1


    As said, all of this is non-trivial, and I am sure there are better,
    more complete descriptions and tutorials on the subject.

    You may want to check the VOICE archives for articles ...

    Regards, JvW

    --
    Jan van Wijk; Author of DFSee: http://www.dfsee.com

  5. Re: Seeking advice on how to make eCs and Win XP to see each other

    On Mon, 7 Nov 2005 00:37:36 UTC "MARK44"
    wrote:

    > Hi, folks!
    >
    > I'm a clueless newbie reagarding networking issues.
    >
    > I has been using eComStation 1.1 and Windows XP SP2 for a while now,
    > each one in its own machine. Both of them have its own modem and I use
    > dial-up to connect to my ISP without any problems. Both machines have
    > NICs and I bought a crossover cable and happily connected them, but
    > from that point onwards I don't have the slightest idea on how to
    > configure neither machine to see each other to share files between the
    > two. Could anybody give me some advice on how to start? Please keep in
    > mind the first statement of this posting!
    >
    > Thank you in advance!


    I installed the NETBIOS protocol on my XP and W2K boxes and have no
    problem. I have also used NETBIOS over TCPIP on the OS/2 box since
    that's the default Windows protocol rather than the non-routable
    NETBIOS but I've had some issues with that since SP2 as well. I think
    I recall reading where MS did their usual and "improved" TCPBEUI
    protocol so that it was incompatible. I know that the LINUX SAMBA had
    to be updated to work with Win which then broke compatibility with
    OS/2 at least for a while. Use the Winodws help to look up NETBIOS
    (or NTEBEUI) for instructions - it's all on the CD.


    --
    Will Honea

  6. Re: Seeking advice on how to make eCs and Win XP to see each other

    On 6 Nov 2005 16:37:36 -0800, MARK44 wrote:
    > I'm a clueless newbie reagarding networking issues.
    >
    > I has been using eComStation 1.1 and Windows XP SP2 for a while now,
    > each one in its own machine. Both of them have its own modem and I use
    > dial-up to connect to my ISP without any problems. Both machines have
    > NICs and I bought a crossover cable and happily connected them, but
    > from that point onwards I don't have the slightest idea on how to
    > configure neither machine to see each other to share files between the
    > two. Could anybody give me some advice on how to start? Please keep in
    > mind the first statement of this posting!


    There are two basic types of networking:
    (a) TCP/IP, a.k.a. 'internet' style networking.
    (b) SMB or NETBIOS, a.k.a. 'file and printer sharing', 'LAN' style
    networking, or 'Windows' style networking. Those last two names are
    technically imprecise, but commonly used (alas).

    It's possible to share files using either method, but (b) is probably what
    you have in mind. (b) is a bit trickier to set up, but generally more
    convenient once it's working.

    I could simply outline the basic steps to try, but that doesn't give you
    much to work with if any complications arise. If I give a brief
    description of how things actually work, hopefully you'll be better
    equipped to manage pitfalls.


    Networking functions in a 'layer' model... think of it like a fancy cake.
    The higher you go, the more abstract the layers get; generally it's the
    topmost layer(s) that you as a user actually see. However, to get
    everything configured, you will have to step into an 'administrator' role,
    which means you must involve yourself somewhat in making sure all of the
    various layers are working.

    (This may sound complicated, but it's really pretty straightforward once
    you get the hang of it.)

    The bottom layers involve basic hardware communications, e.g. your network
    cards, the crossover cable connecting them, and how they talk (both to
    each other, and to the computer they're installed inside). You have at
    least part of this set up already. However, you do need to make sure that
    you install the drivers for the NICs on each PC.

    The next couple of layers deal with how the operating systems and software
    on each PC can talk to each other. This is what you're really interested
    in -- sharing files is something that happens at the OS level.

    The most important thing to remember is that each computer has to be
    speaking the same language in order to understand each other. This
    language is called a 'network protocol'. It can be a bit complicated
    because you actually have a couple of different protocols to choose from.
    Whichever one you choose, YOU MUST INSTALL THE SAME PROTOCOL ON EACH
    COMPUTER, so that they're speaking the same language.

    The two basic choices are NETBEUI and TCPBEUI. This is where a lot of
    people get muddled, because, unfortunately, Windows is set up to use
    TCPBEUI by default, and OS/2-eComStation is set up to use NETBEUI by
    default. You have to choose one or the other (you can use both at once,
    but in most cases it's redundant) and install the the correct protocol on
    the computer that doesn't have it.

    This means that you must either install NETBEUI on Windows XP, or install
    TCPBEUI on eComStation. In many cases, it's easier to install TCPBEUI on
    eComStation (at least, that's the one I know how to do), so I'll assume
    that's what you're doing.

    (By the way, another major source of confusion is how the two OSes refer
    to these two protocols. When Windows refers to 'NetBIOS', it means
    TCPBEUI; whereas when OS/2 refers to 'NetBIOS', it usually means NETBEUI.
    Confusing, huh? And most unfortunate. This is why it's best to refer to
    them as NETBEUI and TCPBEUI, which is unambiguous.)


    That's the basic theory. Now, I suppose you want practical instructions?
    Well, I strongly suggest you read steps Two through Four of this article:
    http://www.mit.edu/afs/athena/activi...ER.HTM#Three_B

    It describes the whole process in better detail than I probably could here
    and now. Just make the following adjustments when reading this article
    (it's a few years old):

    * The article describes connecting OS/2 Warp 4 <-> Windows NT, but the
    instructions apply just as well to eComStation <-> Windows XP. Just
    mentally substitute 'Warp' with 'eComStation', and 'NT' with 'XP'.

    * Ignore any mention of FixPaks in the article.

    * You probably don't need to do anything past Step Four. The remaining
    steps really apply to large corporate networks, and nowadays there are
    more effective techniques available anyway.

    * Under eComStation 1.1, the 'Adapters and Protocol Services' object is
    located under the 'System Setup' --> 'Network' folder. Also, the
    actual dialogs will probably look a bit different (prettier) than the
    screenshots in this article.

    * I am assuming that you have File and Printer Sharing services installed
    already. Unless you went out of your way to disable it when you
    installed eComStation, you almost certainly do have it installed. (I
    hope you do, because installing it after the fact is a PITA.)


    --
    Alex Taylor
    http://www.cs-club.org/~alex

    Remove hat to reply (reply-to address).

  7. Re: Seeking advice on how to make eCs and Win XP to see each other

    Jan,
    Thanks for straightening me out on this subject!

    With all the information you provided, I guess it's time for me to try
    this out.
    Colin

  8. Re: Seeking advice on how to make eCs and Win XP to see each other

    Thanks a lot.

    I dutyfully followed the instructions. I reinstalled eCS to acertain
    that the "File and Print client" is installedand setup an USERID and
    PASSWORD in the final install screen. I also followed the WARPPEER.HTM
    tutorial to completion, with some, but no much advance. The XP box can
    now see the eCS machine in
    MyNetworkPlaces/EntireNetwork/MicrosoftWindowsNetwork/MyWorkgroup, even
    the description I entered in the eCS machine, but that's all,
    folks.When clicked it produces an error dialog "\\Ecs_box is not
    accessible. You might ..." and some more BS about access rights. On the
    eCS side, I hit a Logon dialog to LS network wich refuses to let me
    login to the LAN Domain. The only login I can do is to LAN Logon
    (Workgroup), but the File and Print Client Resourse Browser only sees
    itself. Other utilities clicked at random produced a "NET2215: The
    domain controller cannot be found" errors.

    I assigned IP addresses 10.0.1.168 to the eCS and 10.0.1.169 to XP,
    subnet mask 255.255.255.0 and configured the netbeui, tcpbeui, tcp/ip
    protocols, etc. During eCS install I had to give some mock IP's to get
    the "Next>" button to appear, since I cannot imagine where a DHCP
    server might be. So now there are a couple of "ROUTE: command failed:
    Network is unreachable" on booting. I also edited the LMHOSTS and HOSTS
    files in XP and their equivalents in eCS, with the names of the two
    hosts.

    I think there is something very coarse I might be overlooking by sheer
    ignorance of the issue. Boy, what a mess! I really miss the good old
    days of INTERLNK and INTERSRV on a parallel cable!

    Thank you in advance.

    Alex Taylor wrote:
    > On 6 Nov 2005 16:37:36 -0800, MARK44 wrote:
    > > I'm a clueless newbie reagarding networking issues.
    > >



    > The two basic choices are NETBEUI and TCPBEUI. This is where a lot of
    > people get muddled, because, unfortunately, Windows is set up to use
    > TCPBEUI by default, and OS/2-eComStation is set up to use NETBEUI by
    > default. You have to choose one or the other (you can use both at once,
    > but in most cases it's redundant) and install the the correct protocol on
    > the computer that doesn't have it.
    >
    > This means that you must either install NETBEUI on Windows XP, or install
    > TCPBEUI on eComStation. In many cases, it's easier to install TCPBEUI on
    > eComStation (at least, that's the one I know how to do), so I'll assume
    > that's what you're doing.
    >
    >
    > That's the basic theory. Now, I suppose you want practical instructions?
    > Well, I strongly suggest you read steps Two through Four of this article:
    > http://www.mit.edu/afs/athena/activi...ER.HTM#Three_B
    >
    >



  9. Re: Seeking advice on how to make eCs and Win XP to see each other

    In <1131323856.501325.185690@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups. com>, "MARK44" writes:
    >Hi, folks!
    >
    >I'm a clueless newbie reagarding networking issues.
    >
    >I has been using eComStation 1.1 and Windows XP SP2 for a while now,
    >each one in its own machine. Both of them have its own modem and I use
    >dial-up to connect to my ISP without any problems. Both machines have
    >NICs and I bought a crossover cable and happily connected them, but
    >from that point onwards I don't have the slightest idea on how to
    >configure neither machine to see each other to share files between the
    >two. Could anybody give me some advice on how to start? Please keep in
    >mind the first statement of this posting!
    >
    >Thank you in advance!
    >


    Here's my two pennys worth:-

    I use NetBeui because it avoids all the hassles with XP firewall, DNS and DHCP.

    Whereas a fresh install of Warp peer will serve resources to Warp requesters, it fails with XP requesters.

    In order to serve XP peer requesters, Warp peer must issue net share, user and access commands. In my example startup.cmd below the sequence and syntax is critical. Don't assume I have made typos. Auditing is helpful for debugging.
    --------------------------------------------------------------

    net start peer /auditing:yes
    logon userid /Password
    net config peer /accessalert:1 /alertsched:1 /erroralert:1 /logonalert:1 /netioalert:1

    net use devicename: \\computername\resourcename # network printer

    net share ipc$
    net share sharename=c: /unlimited # root share
    net share sharename=d:\foldername /unlimited
    net share sharename=e: /unlimited # root share removable drives

    net user username /delete
    net user username /active:yes /add /privilege:user /passwordreq:no

    net access c:\ /delete
    net access c:\ /add usernameermissions # root permission
    net access c:\ /trail:yes

    net access d:\foldername /delete
    net access d:\foldername /add usernameermissions usernameermissions
    net access d:\foldername /trail:yes # enable auditing
    net access d:\foldername /apply # apply to subfolders

    net access e: /delete # removable drive
    net access e: /add usernameermissions

    exit
    --------------------------------------------------------------
    Sharenames are advertised to peers.
    Share level security has no effect with XP peers; you must employ user level security.
    Ibmlan.ini may be tweaked to raise the limits on resources to match the capability of modern hardware.
    Configuring your network in one .cmd file instead of across various GUIs, leaves you with an audit trail of what you specified.
    LSerror.exe and LSaudit.exe may be usefully shadowed on your desktop.

    XP tips:-
    Forget Windows Explorer and type \\computername\sharename\foldername\filename in the Save As or Open edit box of your Windows application.

    You may ignore Microsoft's dire warnings and install NetBeui protocol on your secure LAN by first copying from XPCD\valueadd\msft\net\netbeui:-
    nbf.sys to C:\windows\system32\drivers
    netnbf.inf to C:\windows\inf (hidden folder)

    XP 5/10 simultaneous peer connection limits apply to XP peer servers, not to Warp peer servers with a tweaked ibmlan.ini.




  10. Re: Seeking advice on how to make eCs and Win XP to see each other

    On Mon, 7 Nov 2005 07:41:13 UTC, "Jan van Wijk"
    wrote:

    > - Your Windows machine has everything installed to do this.
    > All you need to do is configure its network interface (for the NIC)
    > to use the TCP/IP and Netbios over TCP/IP protocols.


    There's an issue as well, as I recall, about XP not telling OS/2
    what's available unless you dive into the registry and change
    lmannounce (deep down somewhere) from 0 to 1. There were good
    instructions for doing this in the eCS 1.2 installation guide.

    Ian

  11. Re: Seeking advice on how to make eCs and Win XP to see each other

    On Wed, 9 Nov 2005 10:57:56 UTC, "Ian Johnston"
    wrote:

    > On Mon, 7 Nov 2005 07:41:13 UTC, "Jan van Wijk"
    > wrote:
    >
    > > - Your Windows machine has everything installed to do this.
    > > All you need to do is configure its network interface (for the NIC)
    > > to use the TCP/IP and Netbios over TCP/IP protocols.

    >
    > There's an issue as well, as I recall, about XP not telling OS/2
    > what's available unless you dive into the registry and change
    > lmannounce (deep down somewhere) from 0 to 1. There were good
    > instructions for doing this in the eCS 1.2 installation guide.


    This is useful:

    http://www.mit.edu/activities/os2/peer/WARPPEER.HTM



  12. Re: Seeking advice on how to make eCs and Win XP to see each other

    On 8 Nov 2005 18:20:57 -0800, MARK44 wrote:
    > Thanks a lot.
    >
    > I dutyfully followed the instructions. I reinstalled eCS to acertain
    > that the "File and Print client" is installedand setup an USERID and
    > PASSWORD in the final install screen. I also followed the WARPPEER.HTM
    > tutorial to completion, with some, but no much advance. The XP box can
    > now see the eCS machine in
    > MyNetworkPlaces/EntireNetwork/MicrosoftWindowsNetwork/MyWorkgroup, even
    > the description I entered in the eCS machine, but that's all,
    > folks.When clicked it produces an error dialog "\\Ecs_box is not
    > accessible. You might ..." and some more BS about access rights. On the
    > eCS side, I hit a Logon dialog to LS network wich refuses to let me
    > login to the LAN Domain. The only login I can do is to LAN Logon
    > (Workgroup), but the File and Print Client Resourse Browser only sees
    > itself. Other utilities clicked at random produced a "NET2215: The
    > domain controller cannot be found" errors.


    Two more points:
    1) You DID make sure that the Windows and eCS systems are configured to
    use the exact same user ID and password?
    2) Check to see if you have a file \MPTN\ETC\INETCFG.INI on your eCS
    system; some non-default values in this file can break connections
    to XP.

    --
    Alex Taylor
    http://www.cs-club.org/~alex

    Remove hat to reply (reply-to address).

  13. Re: Seeking advice on how to make eCs and Win XP to see each other

    Hi all folks! SUCCESS !!!! eCS and XP are seeing each other!!!! Alex
    Taylor hit the nail with
    the "exact same user ID and password" advice!!! I had the same idea
    before, but didn't realize that my username was "MARCELO" in eCS and
    "Marcelo" in XP. There was a case difference also in the password. I
    changed everything to uppercase in XP and BINGO!, everything happen all
    the sudden. After a week of hair pulling I'm eCStatic (no pun intended,
    I'm really happy!!!) . Some misteries remain, however. 1) sometimes,
    when opening a share in the XP_BOX resource in File and Print Client
    Resource Browser, it do appear at once two, three or four icons for it
    !!! Upon deleting the icons, some of them reappear when browsing it
    again. Even an icon for a DELETED share reappears, but it is obviously
    not functional.
    2) I still can't Logon to LAN Logon (Domain), just to LAN Logon
    (Workgroup). If I attempt to logon to (Domain) I get the same "NET2215:
    The domain controller cannot be found" as before.
    Anyway, THANKS A LOT for your patience !!!


  14. Re: Seeking advice on how to make eCs and Win XP to see each other

    On 9 Nov 2005 19:39:50 -0800, MARK44 wrote:
    > Hi all folks! SUCCESS !!!! eCS and XP are seeing each other!!!! Alex
    > Taylor hit the nail with the "exact same user ID and password" advice!!!
    > I had the same idea before, but didn't realize that my username was
    > "MARCELO" in eCS and "Marcelo" in XP. There was a case difference also
    > in the password. I changed everything to uppercase in XP and BINGO!,
    > everything happen all the sudden. After a week of hair pulling I'm
    > eCStatic (no pun intended, I'm really happy!!!) .


    Glad to hear it.

    > Some misteries remain, however. 1) sometimes,
    > when opening a share in the XP_BOX resource in File and Print Client
    > Resource Browser, it do appear at once two, three or four icons for it
    > !!! Upon deleting the icons, some of them reappear when browsing it
    > again. Even an icon for a DELETED share reappears, but it is obviously
    > not functional.


    The File and Print Client Resource Browser is notoriously flaky that way.
    I would suggest you not use it for day-to-day work.

    It's generally better to simply map a drive letter when you want to access
    a shared directory. Then you can access it through the Drives folder or
    command prompt (or your favourite file manager).

    You can configure eCS to always map a resource on logon.


    > 2) I still can't Logon to LAN Logon (Domain), just to LAN Logon
    > (Workgroup). If I attempt to logon to (Domain) I get the same "NET2215:
    > The domain controller cannot be found" as before.


    That's normal. You don't have a domain controller, so you're not supposed
    to use the Domain logon. (A domain controller would be OS/2 Warp Server,
    or Windows Server 2003, or the equivalent. Possibly Samba if you set it
    up the right way.)

    --
    Alex Taylor
    http://www.cs-club.org/~alex

    Remove hat to reply (reply-to address).

  15. Re: Seeking advice on how to make eCs and Win XP to see each other

    On Thu, 10 Nov 2005 15:57:01 UTC, Alex Taylor
    wrote:

    > The File and Print Client Resource Browser is notoriously flaky that way.
    > I would suggest you not use it for day-to-day work.
    >
    > It's generally better to simply map a drive letter when you want to access
    > a shared directory. Then you can access it through the Drives folder or
    > command prompt (or your favourite file manager).


    The Connection Manager from Warp 4 (CONMAN) is also quite nice.



  16. Re: Seeking advice on how to make eCs and Win XP to see each other

    On 9 Nov 2005 19:39:50 -0800, MARK44 wrote:

    >Taylor hit the nail with
    >the "exact same user ID and password" advice!!! I had the same idea
    >before, but didn't realize that my username was "MARCELO" in eCS and
    >"Marcelo" in XP.


    THANK YOU, Thank You, THANK YOU!

    I had *exactly* the same problem. I forgot that lanmanager translates
    everything into caps. What confused me is that it *used* to work for me w/o
    any problem and after installing SP2 is broke. This was the fix. I've been
    beating my head against the bulkhead for months now and this did it for me.

    BTW, regarding LAN Logon (Domain).... That is for a system that has a domain
    controller managing the network. Maybe you have this but unless you on a
    network of a large corporation I bet you don't. That type of logon will
    always fail.

    Thanks, Jon



  17. Re: Seeking advice on how to make eCs and Win XP to see each other

    Alex Taylor escribió:


    > That's the basic theory. Now, I suppose you want practical instructions?
    > Well, I strongly suggest you read steps Two through Four of this article:
    > http://www.mit.edu/afs/athena/activi...ER.HTM#Three_B
    >


    Thanks for this link, Alex. I have read the instructions, and it has
    worked like a charm. Now the Win XP machine in my home network can use
    the resources provided by my OS/2 machine, and viceversa.

    Carlos


  18. Re: Seeking advice on how to make eCs and Win XP to see each other

    Carlos Royo ha escrito:

    > Alex Taylor escribió:
    >
    >
    > > That's the basic theory. Now, I suppose you want practical instructions?
    > > Well, I strongly suggest you read steps Two through Four of this article:
    > > http://www.mit.edu/afs/athena/activi...ER.HTM#Three_B
    > >

    >
    > Thanks for this link, Alex. I have read the instructions, and it has
    > worked like a charm. Now the Win XP machine in my home network can use
    > the resources provided by my OS/2 machine, and viceversa.
    >
    > Carlos


    Hi, Gurus! Now that my "network" of two machines (should I call it just
    "cablework"?) is working like a Stradivarius, I got inquisitive and
    started tampering with it. Deactivated NetBIOS over TCPIP in the eCS
    machine and "installed" NetBEUI in XP (just copy two files from the XP
    CD to specific locations and bind the protocol to the NIC) and it still
    worked without a hitch.
    There is a problem, however. After LAN Logon (Workgroup) in eCS, it
    complains that this user can't receive Messages because there is a
    duplicate username in the network. It's true: the same user with the
    same password (all case sensitive) is defined in both machines in order
    to allow them to see each other!!! Does it mean that it's not possible
    to send messages between two users that "bind" the machines together?
    Is there a way to tell XP how to see eCS resources without the
    duplicate username? BTW, anyone knows how to send an Alert Message from
    XP? (On eCS is bleeding obvious!). I tried to deactivate the username
    in the XP machine with a NET USER username /DELETE and killed my own
    account for good!!! With the Administrator account and WinCommander I
    was able to reconstruct an account with the same name, My Documents,
    Desktop, Start button and everything else, except Wallpaper which now
    is a blank sheet with the word STUPID across in red Bold Arial 72.
    Happy computing!!!


  19. Re: Seeking advice on how to make eCs and Win XP to see each other

    On 15 Nov 2005 20:07:55 -0800, MARK44 wrote:
    > There is a problem, however. After LAN Logon (Workgroup) in eCS, it
    > complains that this user can't receive Messages because there is a
    > duplicate username in the network. It's true: the same user with the
    > same password (all case sensitive) is defined in both machines in order
    > to allow them to see each other!!! Does it mean that it's not possible
    > to send messages between two users that "bind" the machines together?


    You get that message because you're logged on as the same user on more
    than one machine.

    It's perfectly logical when you think about it. If you try and send a
    message to user 'X' over the LAN, and 'X' is logged on in multiple places,
    how will the messenger know which 'X' to send it to? It can't, obviously,
    so it doesn't.

    It's perfectly possible to log on using different IDs on each machine, but
    you have to make sure that each machine recognizes both user IDs (and
    their passwords).

    For instance, you could define the following users on both machines:
    MEXP
    MEECS
    with the same passwords on each, and give each of them access to all the
    shared resources. Then you could always log on with 'MEXP' on the XP box,
    and as 'MEECS' on the eCS box.

    Most people don't bother, because most people never need to send messages
    (and therefore most of us simply ignore the warning message... or disable
    warnings altogether).


    --
    Alex Taylor
    http://www.cs-club.org/~alex

    Remove hat to reply (reply-to address).

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