802.11g card drivers - OS2

This is a discussion on 802.11g card drivers - OS2 ; I am about to graduate to broadband using Verizon's fiber system ("FiOS"). They will provide a D-Link DI624 802.11g wireless router. Can anyone suggest the best PCI wireless card to install in my eCS 1.15 computer? My principal concern is ...

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Thread: 802.11g card drivers

  1. 802.11g card drivers


    I am about to graduate to broadband using Verizon's fiber system ("FiOS").
    They will provide a D-Link DI624 802.11g wireless router.

    Can anyone suggest the best PCI wireless card to install in my eCS 1.15
    computer? My principal concern is where to get drivers for the card.

    --
    John Varela
    (Trade "OLD" lamps for "NEW" for email.)

  2. Re: 802.11g card drivers

    There currently no 802.11g drivers for OS/2 and limited 802.11b drivers.
    See:
    http://www.os2warp.be/index2.php?name=wifi

    hope this helps.
    Matt


    On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 17:49:44 GMT, John Varela wrote:

    >I am about to graduate to broadband using Verizon's fiber system ("FiOS").
    >They will provide a D-Link DI624 802.11g wireless router.
    >
    >Can anyone suggest the best PCI wireless card to install in my eCS 1.15
    >computer? My principal concern is where to get drivers for the card.
    >
    >--
    >John Varela
    >(Trade "OLD" lamps for "NEW" for email.)



    Matt Walsh El Paso, TX
    OS/2 Outpost....................
    Computin' & Shootin in the dust.................



  3. Re: 802.11g card drivers

    I've seen it suggested that the best way to get wireless networking on
    an OS/2 machine is to use a wireless bridge; this has an Ethernet
    connection to the computer and is thus OS-agnostic.

    But in fact the D-Link router you mention has wired Ethernet ports as
    well, so it's not essential to use a wireless connection at all.

    Perce


    On 07/27/05 01:49 pm John Varela tossed the following ingredients into
    the ever-growing pot of cybersoup:

    > I am about to graduate to broadband using Verizon's fiber system ("FiOS").
    > They will provide a D-Link DI624 802.11g wireless router.
    >
    > Can anyone suggest the best PCI wireless card to install in my eCS 1.15
    > computer? My principal concern is where to get drivers for the card.


  4. Re: 802.11g card drivers

    On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 18:30:19 UTC, "Percival P. Cassidy"
    wrote:

    > I've seen it suggested that the best way to get wireless networking on
    > an OS/2 machine is to use a wireless bridge; this has an Ethernet
    > connection to the computer and is thus OS-agnostic.


    Argh! Thanks for the info anyway.

    OK, I've found a compatible D-Link Ethernet bridge.

    Any suggestions for choice of NIC?

    --
    John Varela
    (Trade "OLD" lamps for "NEW" for email.)

  5. Re: 802.11g card drivers

    John Varela wrote:
    > On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 18:30:19 UTC, "Percival P. Cassidy"
    > wrote:
    >
    > > I've seen it suggested that the best way to get wireless networking on
    > > an OS/2 machine is to use a wireless bridge; this has an Ethernet
    > > connection to the computer and is thus OS-agnostic.

    >
    > Argh! Thanks for the info anyway.
    >
    > OK, I've found a compatible D-Link Ethernet bridge.
    >
    > Any suggestions for choice of NIC?
    >


    > John Varela
    > (Trade "OLD" lamps for "NEW" for email.)


    IBM provided the "IBM Wireless Lan Kit" available frequently on eBay.
    I don't think it will work with any other setup besides its own and
    wired networks. In a nice turnabout, it works ONLY in OS/2 or DOS and
    uses microchannel or ISA, NOT PCI.

    I have a pair but haven't tried them yet.

    Dan


  6. Please stay off-topic!

    John Varela wrote:

    >I am about to graduate to broadband using Verizon's fiber system ("FiOS").
    >They will provide a D-Link DI624 802.11g wireless router.
    >
    >Can anyone suggest the best PCI wireless card to install in my eCS 1.15
    >computer? My principal concern is where to get drivers for the card.
    >
    >
    >

    This post is _supposed_ to be in comp.os.os2.setup, as opposed to the
    drivel that has been posted for the past 10 days or so. But you are
    ruining the newsgroup for the idiots by actually using it to get
    questions answered.

    I don't have answers for your questions, I'm sorry to say. However,
    with regard to NICs, if you need the same kind of card that is needed
    for say a so-called "cable modem", I don't think you can go wrong with
    Intel Pro/100 or Pro/1000 units. They cost a bit, but they work, and
    they still have OS/2 drivers.

  7. Re: Please stay off-topic!

    On Thu, 28 Jul 2005 02:01:26 UTC, Colin Campbell
    wrote:

    > John Varela wrote:
    >
    > >I am about to graduate to broadband using Verizon's fiber system ("FiOS").
    > >They will provide a D-Link DI624 802.11g wireless router.
    > >
    > >Can anyone suggest the best PCI wireless card to install in my eCS 1.15
    > >computer? My principal concern is where to get drivers for the card.
    > >
    > >
    > >

    > This post is _supposed_ to be in comp.os.os2.setup, as opposed to the
    > drivel that has been posted for the past 10 days or so. But you are
    > ruining the newsgroup for the idiots by actually using it to get
    > questions answered.


    I don't know where you're posting from, since this was crossposted to
    comp.os.os2.misc, comp.os.os2.networking.misc, and comp.os.os2.setup.misc,
    and separately posted to ecomstation.support.networking, which should cover
    all the bases. The consensus opinion is to use a bridge, and I have ordered
    one from Amazon.

    > I don't have answers for your questions, I'm sorry to say. However,
    > with regard to NICs, if you need the same kind of card that is needed
    > for say a so-called "cable modem", I don't think you can go wrong with
    > Intel Pro/100 or Pro/1000 units. They cost a bit, but they work, and
    > they still have OS/2 drivers.


    Now I need to select a NIC. If the Intels are still sold and have OS/2
    drivers that sounds good. Are there other cards with OS/2 drivers? Do the
    OS/2 drivers come in the box with the Intel NIC or do they have to be
    downloaded from somewhere? (If the latter, I'd like to check the site to
    make sure they are still there.)

    --
    John Varela
    (Trade "OLD" lamps for "NEW" for email.)

  8. Re: Please stay off-topic!

    John Varela wrote:
    >
    > Now I need to select a NIC. If the Intels are still sold and have OS/2
    > drivers that sounds good. Are there other cards with OS/2 drivers? Do the
    > OS/2 drivers come in the box with the Intel NIC or do they have to be
    > downloaded from somewhere? (If the latter, I'd like to check the site to
    > make sure they are still there.)
    >

    Every nic I have ever purchased came with either a floppy or cd containing
    drivers. Chuck McKinnis(sp?) has a website with info on which nics have os/2
    drivers that work. I have always made sure the nic I bought was on the list.
    There are lots of them.

    Look on the disk (using ZTree for example) for file(s) with an os2 extension.
    That'll be the driver. In the same directory (or subtree) you should also find
    a nif file and a protocol.ini file. If you find more than one instance of a nif
    file associated with an os2 driver, generally one that is only a few hundred
    bytes is some kind of stub that you should ignore. Use nif that has a size of
    several thousand bytes and the driver that goes with it. Both the nif and
    protocol.ini are text files that you can look at with a file viewer. A quick
    glance usually suffices to pick out the right one. I think they put more than
    one version on the disk to confuse the opposition, whoever that may be.

    Typically the driver will be found in a subtree with a name like NDIS, NDIS2,
    OS2, or MSLANMAN.OS2.

    Each manufacturer seems to do it a little differently but a little snooping
    around usually pays off.

    Once you figure out the path, point the configuration program at it and the name
    of the adapter should appear as an installable option.

    YMMV.

  9. Re: Please stay off-topic!

    Note, however, that manufacturers don't always update their drivers to
    suit a new hardware design. Both D-Link and Linksys NICs (especially
    more recent ones) often come with OS/2 drivers that don't work with that
    version of the NIC. In that case it's necesssary to get a driver from
    the chip manufacturer.

    Perce


    On 07/28/05 04:52 pm James J. Weinkam tossed the following ingredients
    into the ever-growing pot of cybersoup:

    >> Now I need to select a NIC. If the Intels are still sold and have
    >> OS/2 drivers that sounds good. Are there other cards with OS/2
    >> drivers? Do the OS/2 drivers come in the box with the Intel NIC or do
    >> they have to be downloaded from somewhere? (If the latter, I'd like
    >> to check the site to make sure they are still there.)
    >>

    > Every nic I have ever purchased came with either a floppy or cd
    > containing drivers. Chuck McKinnis(sp?) has a website with info on
    > which nics have os/2 drivers that work. I have always made sure the nic
    > I bought was on the list. There are lots of them.
    >
    > Look on the disk (using ZTree for example) for file(s) with an os2
    > extension. That'll be the driver. In the same directory (or subtree)
    > you should also find a nif file and a protocol.ini file. If you find
    > more than one instance of a nif file associated with an os2 driver,
    > generally one that is only a few hundred bytes is some kind of stub that
    > you should ignore. Use nif that has a size of several thousand bytes
    > and the driver that goes with it. Both the nif and protocol.ini are
    > text files that you can look at with a file viewer. A quick glance
    > usually suffices to pick out the right one. I think they put more than
    > one version on the disk to confuse the opposition, whoever that may be.
    >
    > Typically the driver will be found in a subtree with a name like NDIS,
    > NDIS2, OS2, or MSLANMAN.OS2.
    >
    > Each manufacturer seems to do it a little differently but a little
    > snooping around usually pays off.
    >
    > Once you figure out the path, point the configuration program at it and
    > the name of the adapter should appear as an installable option.


  10. Re: Please stay off-topic!

    John Varela wrote:
    > On Thu, 28 Jul 2005 02:01:26 UTC, Colin Campbell


    > Now I need to select a NIC. If the Intels are still sold and have OS/2
    > drivers that sounds good. Are there other cards with OS/2 drivers? Do the
    > OS/2 drivers come in the box with the Intel NIC or do they have to be
    > downloaded from somewhere? (If the latter, I'd like to check the site to
    > make sure they are still there.)


    Intel PRO/100 cards (many variants of this card) are what you want, they
    are easily found, inexpensive, and well supported by Intel.

    Linksys - is pure consumer-grade nonsense, avoid any of their products
    (I know many here will diagree). Their OS2 support is nowhere, there
    devices are cheap and "for the masses".

    Intel has business customers that use OS2 on their servers, and all
    (well, almost all) IBM servers ship with Intel PRO/100 (or 1000)
    Ethernet devices onboard. So, they continue to update their drivers
    for OS2 regularly...


  11. Re: Please stay off-topic!

    On Fri, 29 Jul 2005 01:11:44 UTC, Daniel Jones wrote:

    > Intel PRO/100 cards (many variants of this card) are what you want, they
    > are easily found, inexpensive, and well supported by Intel.


    I found a PRO/100 S, supposedly brand new, on eBay buy-it-now for $1.99. In
    my book that counts as inexpensive, even after adding in the $5.95 shipping
    cost. I've also downloaded what I expect is a current driver from the Intel
    web site.

    So I think I'm all set to go as soon as the hardware arrives in the mail.

    Thanks to all who responded to my query.

    --
    John Varela
    (Trade "OLD" lamps for "NEW" for email.)

  12. Re: Please stay off-topic!

    Daniel Jones wrote:
    > Linksys - is pure consumer-grade nonsense, avoid any of their products
    > (I know many here will diagree). Their OS2 support is nowhere, there
    > devices are cheap and "for the masses".


    Which of their devices are you refering to? I have a Linksys router
    that was easy to set up and has given no trouble since I got it about a
    year ago.

    Ted

  13. Re: Please stay off-topic!

    Hi Ted

    Ted Edwards wrote:
    > Daniel Jones wrote:
    >> Linksys - is pure consumer-grade nonsense, avoid any of their products
    >> (I know many here will diagree). Their OS2 support is nowhere, there
    >> devices are cheap and "for the masses".

    >
    > Which of their devices are you refering to? I have a Linksys router
    > that was easy to set up and has given no trouble since I got it about a
    > year ago.
    >



    Anything that needs drivers I would guess - I think the poster was
    referring to the fact that Linksys are a bit lax about making sure that
    OS/2 drivers are available for whatever chipset is used on the current
    LNE100TX nic.

    Difficult to muck up hardware that does not need drivers such as routers
    :-)

    Regards

    Pete

  14. Re: Please stay off-topic!

    Captain's log. On StarDate Fri, 29 Jul 2005 19:33:23 GMT received comm from Ted
    Edwards on channel comp.os.os2.misc:

    : Daniel Jones wrote:
    : > Linksys - is pure consumer-grade nonsense, avoid any of their products
    : > (I know many here will diagree). Their OS2 support is nowhere, there
    : > devices are cheap and "for the masses".
    :
    : Which of their devices are you refering to? I have a Linksys router
    : that was easy to set up and has given no trouble since I got it about a
    : year ago.

    Same here. For my home network I have the Linksys Cisco RV082 router who has
    excellent performance and features (it has also won many tests for this).

    http://www.broadbandbuyer.co.uk/Shop...ShopGroupID=12

    Highly recommended.

    Best regards,

    martin

    --
    http://martin.tornsten.com/

  15. Re: Please stay off-topic!

    Martin Törnsten wrote:
    > Captain's log. On StarDate Fri, 29 Jul 2005 19:33:23 GMT received comm from Ted
    > Edwards on channel comp.os.os2.misc:
    >
    > : Daniel Jones wrote:
    > : > Linksys - is pure consumer-grade nonsense, avoid any of their products
    > : > (I know many here will diagree). Their OS2 support is nowhere, there
    > : > devices are cheap and "for the masses".
    > :
    > : Which of their devices are you refering to? I have a Linksys router
    > : that was easy to set up and has given no trouble since I got it abouta
    > : year ago.
    >
    > Same here. For my home network I have the Linksys Cisco RV082 router who has
    > excellent performance and features (it has also won many tests for this).
    >
    > http://www.broadbandbuyer.co.uk/Shop...ShopGroupID=12
    >
    > Highly recommended.
    >
    > Best regards,
    >
    > martin
    >


    What Linksys router (model number?) would work with my laptop with the
    OS/2 Convenience Pack installed? I scheduled an installation
    appointment then cancelled after they said their service would only work
    with WindowsXP. Would do I need to get from the Comcast people and what
    do I need to get the router to connect? If I let them set it up under
    WindowsXP using my laptop then boot into OS/2, would the same router
    cable into the Ethernet port work under OS/2 or are there special steps
    that need to be made? I have trouble setting up a dial up connection
    and broadband is a hurtle to overcome.

  16. Re: Please stay off-topic!

    I've used a Linksys WRT54G wireless/wired router/switch with both
    Optimum Online (NY Metro area ISP) and Charter cable Internet services
    (both of which offically support only Windozze and Mac) and configured
    the router (and even upgraded its firmware) using Mozilla running on
    OS/2 (actually eComStation, but it shouldn't make any difference).

    These routers are actually Linux-based computers.

    I set up the router to allocate IP addresses using DHCP, then I set up
    each machine to use a specific IP address within the range being
    allocated by the router.

    Give a yell if you need further help.

    Perce


    On 07/29/05 08:17 pm Jack Williams tossed the following ingredients into
    the ever-growing pot of cybersoup:

    > What Linksys router (model number?) would work with my laptop with the
    > OS/2 Convenience Pack installed? I scheduled an installation
    > appointment then cancelled after they said their service would only work
    > with WindowsXP. Would do I need to get from the Comcast people and what
    > do I need to get the router to connect? If I let them set it up under
    > WindowsXP using my laptop then boot into OS/2, would the same router
    > cable into the Ethernet port work under OS/2 or are there special steps
    > that need to be made? I have trouble setting up a dial up connection
    > and broadband is a hurtle to overcome.


  17. Re: Please stay off-topic!

    Sir:

    Jack Williams wrote:
    >
    > What Linksys router (model number?) would work with my laptop with the
    > OS/2 Convenience Pack installed? I scheduled an installation
    > appointment then cancelled after they said their service would only work
    > with WindowsXP. Would do I need to get from the Comcast people and what
    > do I need to get the router to connect? If I let them set it up under
    > WindowsXP using my laptop then boot into OS/2, would the same router
    > cable into the Ethernet port work under OS/2 or are there special steps
    > that need to be made? I have trouble setting up a dial up connection
    > and broadband is a hurtle to overcome.
    >

    These technicians all come with their own laptops. If need be, they can
    setup your modem/router and register it with Comcast using their laptop.
    If you do this, have them configure it to give you DHCP addresses.
    Then after they have gone, you can go into the modem/router and change
    it to suit your needs. I've had no problem using Mozilla or Netscape to
    connect to the router's web page at the default address. Since these
    are all Linux operating systems, and if you are a Linux guru, you can
    even telnet into the router and use the command line interface (shell
    interface). One of the first things I would do is go to the
    manufacturer's web site and download the latest firmware for the router
    and install it. Then configure it. The only thing that Comcast wants
    is the MAC address of the device that connects to their network, so that
    they can do MAC lookups to authorize your connection. But their process
    requires exchange of keys to prove that it is you giving this
    infomation, for which they have created a XP program that trades this
    info in encrypted form. You know that if you don't want the technician
    to bother you, you can do this registration on the telphone using
    Mozilla and OS/2. I did that a few years ago when Comcast required
    everyone to change modems. I have separate modem, router, switch. The
    modem is leased.
    --
    Bill
    Thanks a Million!

  18. Re: 802.11g card drivers

    On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 21:40:02 UTC, "Dan-the-K"
    wrote:

    -> John Varela wrote:
    -> > On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 18:30:19 UTC, "Percival P. Cassidy"
    -> > wrote:
    -> >
    -> > > I've seen it suggested that the best way to get wireless networking on
    -> > > an OS/2 machine is to use a wireless bridge; this has an Ethernet
    -> > > connection to the computer and is thus OS-agnostic.
    -> >
    -> > Argh! Thanks for the info anyway.
    -> >
    -> > OK, I've found a compatible D-Link Ethernet bridge.
    -> >
    -> > Any suggestions for choice of NIC?
    -> >
    ->
    -> > John Varela
    -> > (Trade "OLD" lamps for "NEW" for email.)
    ->
    -> IBM provided the "IBM Wireless Lan Kit" available frequently on eBay.
    -> I don't think it will work with any other setup besides its own and
    -> wired networks. In a nice turnabout, it works ONLY in OS/2 or DOS and
    -> uses microchannel or ISA, NOT PCI.
    ->
    -> I have a pair but haven't tried them yet.
    ->
    -> Dan
    ->

    There is an article on the IBM Wireless LAN that I wrote 5 years ago -
    http://www.os2voice.org/VNL/past_iss...0H/vnewsf5.htm

    This is totally incompatible with any other wireless standards,
    including all the modern 802.11x stuff.

    As someone suggested, for now the only option for 802.11g is a
    wireless bridge. See Daniela's article on the Asus WL330g
    http://www.os2voice.org/VNL/past_iss...5H/vnewsf4.htm

    There is a driver being worked on that will allow the use of win32
    drivers, but that has been in a very closed beta for a long time now.

    Mark

    --
    From the eComStation of Mark Dodel

    http://www.os2voice.org
    Warpstock 2005, Hershey, PA, Oct 6-9, 2005 - http://www.warpstock.org

  19. Re: 802.11g card drivers

    In , "Mark Dodel" writes:
    >On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 21:40:02 UTC, "Dan-the-K"
    >wrote:
    >
    >-> John Varela wrote:
    >-> > On Wed, 27 Jul 2005 18:30:19 UTC, "Percival P. Cassidy"
    >-> > wrote:
    >-> >
    >-> > > I've seen it suggested that the best way to get wireless networking on
    >-> > > an OS/2 machine is to use a wireless bridge; this has an Ethernet
    >-> > > connection to the computer and is thus OS-agnostic.
    >-> >
    >-> > Argh! Thanks for the info anyway.
    >-> >
    >-> > OK, I've found a compatible D-Link Ethernet bridge.
    >-> >
    >-> > Any suggestions for choice of NIC?
    >-> >
    >->
    >-> > John Varela
    >-> > (Trade "OLD" lamps for "NEW" for email.)
    >->
    >-> IBM provided the "IBM Wireless Lan Kit" available frequently on eBay.
    >-> I don't think it will work with any other setup besides its own and
    >-> wired networks. In a nice turnabout, it works ONLY in OS/2 or DOS and
    >-> uses microchannel or ISA, NOT PCI.
    >->
    >-> I have a pair but haven't tried them yet.
    >->
    >-> Dan
    >->
    >
    >There is an article on the IBM Wireless LAN that I wrote 5 years ago -
    >http://www.os2voice.org/VNL/past_iss...0H/vnewsf5.htm
    >
    >This is totally incompatible with any other wireless standards,
    >including all the modern 802.11x stuff.


    John,

    If you want to experiment with this vintage stuff, let me know and for a modest fee and shipping I'll send you a box with enuff stuff for 3 machines, one base and two clients. I have some literature but won't be able to offer much help anymore for install or maintenance. ;-)


    Best Regards,

    David
    C.M. Consultants, Inc
    (Due to excessive spam I do not publish my e-mail address)

  20. Re: 802.11g card drivers

    On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 02:56:39 UTC, "Mark Dodel"
    wrote:

    > There is an article on the IBM Wireless LAN that I wrote 5 years ago -
    > http://www.os2voice.org/VNL/past_iss...0H/vnewsf5.htm
    >
    > This is totally incompatible with any other wireless standards,
    > including all the modern 802.11x stuff.


    If it's IBM it would be a token ring network, wouldn't it?

    --
    John Varela
    (Trade "OLD" lamps for "NEW" for email.)

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