802.11g card drivers - OS2

This is a discussion on 802.11g card drivers - OS2 ; On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 16:32:12 UTC, "John Varela" wrote: -> -> On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 02:56:39 UTC, "Mark Dodel" -> wrote: -> -> > There is an article on the IBM Wireless LAN that I wrote 5 years ...

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Thread: 802.11g card drivers

  1. Re: 802.11g card drivers

    On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 16:32:12 UTC, "John Varela"
    wrote:

    ->
    -> On Sun, 31 Jul 2005 02:56:39 UTC, "Mark Dodel"
    -> wrote:
    ->
    -> > There is an article on the IBM Wireless LAN that I wrote 5 years ago -
    -> > http://www.os2voice.org/VNL/past_iss...0H/vnewsf5.htm
    -> >
    -> > This is totally incompatible with any other wireless standards,
    -> > including all the modern 802.11x stuff.
    ->
    -> If it's IBM it would be a token ring network, wouldn't it?
    ->

    It could work with both ethernet or token ring as I recall. I had no
    Token Ring here, just Ethernet, and it worked fine for me using OS/2.
    Just had to have a machine with both a wired NIC and the wireless ISA
    card and bridge the two.

    There was a totally incompatible IBM Wireless product that only worked
    with windoze95, both with the same name. The one that worked with
    OS/2 and DOS was a dual bus card (ISA and MCA) and PCMCIA cards. The
    windoze one only had PCMCIA cards as I recall.

    Mark


    --
    From the eComStation of Mark Dodel

    http://www.os2voice.org
    Warpstock 2005, Hershey, PA, Oct 6-9, 2005 - http://www.warpstock.org

  2. Re: 802.11g card drivers

    Mark Dodel turpitued:

    >As someone suggested, for now the only option for 802.11g is a
    >wireless bridge. See Daniela's article on the Asus WL330g
    >http://www.os2voice.org/VNL/past_iss...5H/vnewsf4.htm


    I'm still looking for a way to get wireless access on my home
    computer. (But the search is going slowly because I'm bogged down
    by other jobs, and for now I use my office machine when I want
    a decent network connection, so I'm prepared to wait until I'm
    sure I know what solution I want.) The combination of an ethernet
    card connected to a wireless bridge does seem to be the best solution:
    it allows 802.11g speeds without any need for OS/2 drivers. (Apart
    from a driver for the ethernet card, and it's still fairly easy to
    find OS/2-compatible ethernet cards.)

    And the Asus device recommended by Daniela certainly looks good, but
    it has one drawback: it's about twice as powerful as we'd ever
    need. (It can also be configured as a wireless access point, and
    - in my case, and probably in most other people's case - the access
    point already exists somewhere else in the house, and is not needed
    on the "slave" end of the connection.) That, presumably, makes it
    more expensive than it needs to be. The prices I saw were certainly
    higher than I expected to spend.

    Does anyone know of a similar device that only has the functionality
    to act as a slave to an existing access point, which presumably would
    make it cheaper?

    --
    Peter Moylan peter at ee dot newcastle dot edu dot au
    http://eepjm.newcastle.edu.au (OS/2 and eCS information and software)

  3. Re: 802.11g card drivers

    On Mon, 1 Aug 2005 01:08:00 UTC, peter@seagoon.newcastle.edu.au (Peter
    Moylan) wrote:

    > Mark Dodel turpitued:
    >
    > >As someone suggested, for now the only option for 802.11g is a
    > >wireless bridge. See Daniela's article on the Asus WL330g
    > >http://www.os2voice.org/VNL/past_iss...5H/vnewsf4.htm

    >
    > I'm still looking for a way to get wireless access on my home
    > computer. (But the search is going slowly because I'm bogged down
    > by other jobs, and for now I use my office machine when I want
    > a decent network connection, so I'm prepared to wait until I'm
    > sure I know what solution I want.) The combination of an ethernet
    > card connected to a wireless bridge does seem to be the best solution:
    > it allows 802.11g speeds without any need for OS/2 drivers. (Apart
    > from a driver for the ethernet card, and it's still fairly easy to
    > find OS/2-compatible ethernet cards.)
    >
    > And the Asus device recommended by Daniela certainly looks good, but
    > it has one drawback: it's about twice as powerful as we'd ever
    > need. (It can also be configured as a wireless access point, and
    > - in my case, and probably in most other people's case - the access
    > point already exists somewhere else in the house, and is not needed
    > on the "slave" end of the connection.) That, presumably, makes it
    > more expensive than it needs to be. The prices I saw were certainly
    > higher than I expected to spend.
    >
    > Does anyone know of a similar device that only has the functionality
    > to act as a slave to an existing access point, which presumably would
    > make it cheaper?
    >



    --
    Actually, the bridges sometimes seems to be more expensive than the
    inexpensive APs.

    When I last looked around, I couldn't find information about what
    routers could act as a bridge between 2 wired nets here at home, so I
    went with one of these wifi bridges, since I could actually add a few
    computers to it using a small switch.

    I'm currently using a Netgear WGE101 with my desktop.

    They are also available to make game systems wireless.

    The 2 modes it can be used in is Adhoc, with just one other wifi card,
    and as a client in a managed network.

  4. Re: 802.11g card drivers

    I saw one at Best Buy for $49 which wasn't too bad. It had a travel case
    etc.
    MJW


    On Mon, 1 Aug 2005 01:08:00 +0000 (UTC), Peter Moylan wrote:

    >
    >
    >Mark Dodel turpitued:
    >
    >>As someone suggested, for now the only option for 802.11g is a
    >>wireless bridge. See Daniela's article on the Asus WL330g
    >>http://www.os2voice.org/VNL/past_iss...5H/vnewsf4.htm

    >
    >I'm still looking for a way to get wireless access on my home
    >computer. (But the search is going slowly because I'm bogged down
    >by other jobs, and for now I use my office machine when I want
    >a decent network connection, so I'm prepared to wait until I'm
    >sure I know what solution I want.) The combination of an ethernet
    >card connected to a wireless bridge does seem to be the best solution:
    >it allows 802.11g speeds without any need for OS/2 drivers. (Apart
    >from a driver for the ethernet card, and it's still fairly easy to
    >find OS/2-compatible ethernet cards.)
    >
    >And the Asus device recommended by Daniela certainly looks good, but
    >it has one drawback: it's about twice as powerful as we'd ever
    >need. (It can also be configured as a wireless access point, and
    >- in my case, and probably in most other people's case - the access
    >point already exists somewhere else in the house, and is not needed
    >on the "slave" end of the connection.) That, presumably, makes it
    >more expensive than it needs to be. The prices I saw were certainly
    >higher than I expected to spend.
    >
    >Does anyone know of a similar device that only has the functionality
    >to act as a slave to an existing access point, which presumably would
    >make it cheaper?
    >
    >--
    >Peter Moylan peter at ee dot newcastle dot edu dot au
    >http://eepjm.newcastle.edu.au (OS/2 and eCS information and software)



    Matt Walsh El Paso, TX
    OS/2 Outpost....................
    Computin' & Shootin in the dust.................



  5. Re: 802.11g card drivers

    Kevin K turpitued:

    >Actually, the bridges sometimes seems to be more expensive than the
    >inexpensive APs.
    >
    >When I last looked around, I couldn't find information about what
    >routers could act as a bridge between 2 wired nets here at home, so I
    >went with one of these wifi bridges, since I could actually add a few
    >computers to it using a small switch.
    >
    >I'm currently using a Netgear WGE101 with my desktop.


    Thanks for that reference. I had a look around at suppliers, and
    that one seems to be about the same price as the Asus one: about
    $150 Australian. Presumably I could cut the price in half (as with
    most computer gear) by buying from the US, but that creates the
    headaches of postage cost, customs delays, etc. I think I'll just
    have to grit my teeth and pay the high price.

    You're right, though, in general the bridges seem to be more
    expensive (and less available) than the APs. Presumably this is
    because of a lower demand. Windows users can get away with much
    cheaper solutions.

    --
    Peter Moylan peter at ee dot newcastle dot edu dot au
    http://eepjm.newcastle.edu.au (OS/2 and eCS information and software)

  6. Re: 802.11g card drivers

    On Tue, 2 Aug 2005 23:31:39 UTC, peter@seagoon.newcastle.edu.au (Peter
    Moylan) wrote:

    > Kevin K turpitued:
    >
    > >Actually, the bridges sometimes seems to be more expensive than the
    > >inexpensive APs.
    > >
    > >When I last looked around, I couldn't find information about what
    > >routers could act as a bridge between 2 wired nets here at home, so I
    > >went with one of these wifi bridges, since I could actually add a few
    > >computers to it using a small switch.
    > >
    > >I'm currently using a Netgear WGE101 with my desktop.

    >
    > Thanks for that reference. I had a look around at suppliers, and
    > that one seems to be about the same price as the Asus one: about
    > $150 Australian. Presumably I could cut the price in half (as with
    > most computer gear) by buying from the US, but that creates the
    > headaches of postage cost, customs delays, etc. I think I'll just
    > have to grit my teeth and pay the high price.
    >
    > You're right, though, in general the bridges seem to be more
    > expensive (and less available) than the APs. Presumably this is
    > because of a lower demand. Windows users can get away with much
    > cheaper solutions.
    >


    Have you looked at one of the markets? I've noticed wireless routers
    cheap at the ones here in Gosford, but, I haven't looked for these
    type of devices. The schedule for the two I know of are at
    and
    . I see the Lake Macquarie one is
    on tomorrow, and then at the Basketball stadium next weekend.


    --
    David Forrester
    davidfor at internode dot on dot net
    http://www.os2world.com/djfos2

  7. Re: 802.11g card drivers

    David Forrester turpitued:
    >On Tue, 2 Aug 2005 23:31:39 UTC, peter@seagoon.newcastle.edu.au (Peter
    >Moylan) wrote:
    >
    >> Kevin K turpitued:
    >>
    >> >Actually, the bridges sometimes seems to be more expensive than the
    >> >inexpensive APs.
    >> >
    >> >When I last looked around, I couldn't find information about what
    >> >routers could act as a bridge between 2 wired nets here at home, so I
    >> >went with one of these wifi bridges, since I could actually add a few
    >> >computers to it using a small switch.
    >> >
    >> >I'm currently using a Netgear WGE101 with my desktop.

    >>
    >> Thanks for that reference. I had a look around at suppliers, and
    >> that one seems to be about the same price as the Asus one: about
    >> $150 Australian. Presumably I could cut the price in half (as with
    >> most computer gear) by buying from the US, but that creates the
    >> headaches of postage cost, customs delays, etc. I think I'll just
    >> have to grit my teeth and pay the high price.
    >>
    >> You're right, though, in general the bridges seem to be more
    >> expensive (and less available) than the APs. Presumably this is
    >> because of a lower demand. Windows users can get away with much
    >> cheaper solutions.

    >
    >Have you looked at one of the markets? I've noticed wireless routers
    >cheap at the ones here in Gosford, but, I haven't looked for these
    >type of devices. The schedule for the two I know of are at
    > and
    >. I see the Lake Macquarie one is
    >on tomorrow, and then at the Basketball stadium next weekend.


    In fact I got a fairly good deal at the markets for a wireless router,
    so maybe I could do the same for the client end. However, another
    possibility has come up. Looking at the Warpstock schedule I see
    that someone has successfully used a D-Link DWL-G730AP as a wireless
    client, and after a search through the Australian suppliers that will
    accept on-line orders it seems as if that one is available for ~$130
    including GST if you pick the right supplier. Of course that's not
    a huge difference from the Asus price.

    Perhaps I should indeed check out the next computer fair. From what
    I've seen on-line, though, not many suppliers carry this sort of
    device (while just about everyone sells all sorts of wireless routers),
    so the odds are not good for finding such a product at a fair. I
    suspect that I've recently wrecked a sound card and an ethernet card
    by an inadvertent power-on at the wrong time (I forgot to switch off
    at the wall while moving some cards around) so there's most likely
    more stuff I need to buy.

    --
    Peter Moylan peter at ee dot newcastle dot edu dot au
    http://eepjm.newcastle.edu.au (OS/2 and eCS information and software)

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