dos-settings global aendern? - OS2

This is a discussion on dos-settings global aendern? - OS2 ; Ich habe seit Jahren kaum noch DOS Fenster gebraucht, so dass mir die Details entfallen sind... Für meine neue Digicam existiert zur Konvertierung RAW->PPM das Programm DCRAW, ein 32-bit DOS Konsol-Programm. Die Default-Einstellung der OS/2 DOS-Fenster mit 16MB DPMI Speicher ...

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Thread: dos-settings global aendern?

  1. dos-settings global aendern?

    Ich habe seit Jahren kaum noch DOS Fenster gebraucht, so dass mir die Details
    entfallen sind...

    Für meine neue Digicam existiert zur Konvertierung RAW->PPM das Programm
    DCRAW,
    ein 32-bit DOS Konsol-Programm. Die Default-Einstellung der OS/2 DOS-Fenster
    mit
    16MB DPMI Speicher reicht für das Programm nicht aus, daher würde ich gerne
    die
    default Speicherzuteilung global erhöhen. Ich weiß, wie das global für WinOS2
    Sessions
    geht oder auch für DOS Fenster, die aus einem WPS Icons heraus gestartet
    werden.
    Aber wie geht das für sonstige DOS Fenster, die aus einem OS/2 Batch-File
    (.cmd)
    heraus gestartet werden?



  2. modify dos-settings?

    Sorry for the German language post, here again in English:

    For my new digicam there exists a 32 bit DOS software
    called DCRAW, to convert raw image files to PPM format.
    The default setting of 16MB DPMI memory for any DOS
    sessions in OS/2 is not enough to run that program. So I would
    like to increase that setting globally for all DOS sessions.
    I know how to do this for WinOS2 sessions only, or for DOS
    sessions started from a WPS icon.
    But how can I modify the DOS settings for any DOS window
    started from an OS/2 batch file (.cmd)?




  3. Re: modify dos-settings?

    On Sat, 15 Jan 2005 19:58:33 +0100 (MEZ), R L
    wrote:

    > But how can I modify the DOS settings for any DOS window
    > started from an OS/2 batch file (.cmd)?


    You can't TTBOMK. This is one of the flaws of the system.
    I think the only way you can do it is by setting the appropriate
    environment variables in a call to DosStartSession().

  4. Re: modify dos-settings?

    R L wrote:
    > Sorry for the German language post, here again in English:
    >
    > For my new digicam there exists a 32 bit DOS software
    > called DCRAW, to convert raw image files to PPM format.
    > The default setting of 16MB DPMI memory for any DOS
    > sessions in OS/2 is not enough to run that program. So I would
    > like to increase that setting globally for all DOS sessions.
    > I know how to do this for WinOS2 sessions only, or for DOS
    > sessions started from a WPS icon.
    > But how can I modify the DOS settings for any DOS window
    > started from an OS/2 batch file (.cmd)?
    >
    >
    >

    Get startd.zip from Hobbes.

    This program is similar to the start command except that it can read a file of
    dos settings and apply them to the session to be started. See the readme for
    more details.

    For example here is the pcw.cmd file that I use to enable ZTreeBold to start
    PCWrite4.1 in a dos session:

    g:\startd\startd /win /dos /fg /sf e:\ztbold\dos.ini c:\bat\ed.bat %1 %2 %3 %4

    Here is dos.ini

    IDLE_SECONDS=1
    IDLE_SENSITIVITY=1
    DOS_BACKGROUND_EXECUTION=0
    VIDEO_FASTPASTE=1

    You can discover the correct spelling of the keywords and what to use for the
    coded value by setting up what you want in the DOS settings notebook for a
    command window then exporting the settings to a file by using the print button,
    selecting encoded file, and entering a fully qualified filename in place of the
    spool file. For instance, the settings notebook displays On and Off as the
    possible choices for VIDEO_FASTPASTE but the exported file reveals that these
    should be encoded as 1 and 0 respectively.

    My understanding of the encoded file entries is:

    KEYWORD
    t=n (type of entry: 0=boolean, 1=integer, 2=character)
    v=value (there may be several v lines for certain keywords
    d=default

  5. Re: modify dos-settings?

    On Sat, 15 Jan 2005 20:13:05 GMT, James J. Weinkam wrote:

    >Get startd.zip from Hobbes.


    That's what I needed. I tried it out and it's working.




  6. Re: modify dos-settings?

    R L wrote:

    > But how can I modify the DOS settings for any DOS window
    > started from an OS/2 batch file (.cmd)?


    put them in environment variables, when using batch files.
    Example (bigdos.cmd

    @echo off
    set dossetting.DOS_UMB=1
    set dossetting.DOS_HIGH=1
    set dossetting.EMS_MEMORY_LIMIT=0
    set dossetting.EMS_FRAME_LOCATION=NONE
    set dossetting.XMS_MEMORY_LIMIT=12968
    set dossetting.XMS_MINIMUM_HMA=7
    set dossetting.XMS_HANDLES=128
    set dossetting.DPMI_MEMORY_LIMIT=85
    set dossetting.DPMI_DOS_API=ENABLED
    C:\nc\nc.exe

    --
    Veit Kannegieser

  7. Re: modify dos-settings?

    On 15 Jan 2005 20:49:56 GMT, Veit Kannegieser wrote:

    >set dossetting.DPMI_MEMORY_LIMIT=85


    Thank you.
    This (undocumented?) method is even easier to use
    compared to the startd.exe solution.




  8. Re: modify dos-settings?

    Here in comp.os.os2.setup.misc,
    "R L" spake unto us, saying:

    >But how can I modify the DOS settings for any DOS window
    >started from an OS/2 batch file (.cmd)?


    The 4OS2 "START" command also lets you specify a settings file on the
    /DOS switch for that VDM when running a DOS program from the prompt via
    the START command:

    START - Start a program in another session

    Purpose: Start a program in another session or window.

    Format: START ["program title "] [/B[G] /C /DOS[=optfile ] /F[G] /FS
    /I /ICON=iconfile /INV /K /L /LA /LD /LH /MAX /MIN /N /PGM
    progname /PM /POS=x,y,width,height /WAIT /WIN /WIN3[=optfile ]
    /WIN3S[=optfile ]] [command ]

    program title : Title to appear on title bar.
    optfile : Option settings file.
    iconfile : Name of icon (.ICO ) file.
    progname : Program name (not the session name).
    path : Startup directory.
    command : Command to be executed.


    /B[G] (background session) /LH (local history list)
    /C(lose when done) /MAX(imized)
    /DOS (DOS session) /MIN(imized)
    /F[G] (foreground session) /N(o command processor)
    /FS (full screen) /PGM (program name)
    /I(nherit environment) /PM (PM application)
    /ICON (.ICO file) /POS(ition of window)
    /INV(isible) /WAIT (for session to finish)
    /K(eep when done) /WIN(dowed session)
    /L(ocal lists) /WIN3 (Windows enhanced mode)
    /LA (local aliases) /WIN3S (Windows standard mode)
    /LD (local dir history)

    See also: DETACH.

    Usage

    START is used to begin a new OS/2 session, and optionally run a program in
    that session. If you use START with no parameters, it will begin a new
    command-line session. If you add a command, START will begin a new
    session or window and execute that command.

    The program title, if it is included, will appear on the title bar, and on
    the Presentation Manager window list. The program title must be enclosed
    in quotation marks and cannot exceed 60 characters. If the program title
    is omitted, the program name will be used as the title.

    START always assumes that the first quoted string on the command line is
    the program title; if there is a second quoted string it is assumed to be
    the command. As a result, if the name of the program you are starting is
    a long filename containing whitespace (and must therefore be quoted), you
    cannot simply place it on the command line. If you do, as the first
    quoted string it will be interpreted as the program title, not the
    command. To address this, use the /PGM switch to indicate explicitly that
    the quoted string is the program name, or include a title before the
    program name. For example, to start the program "C:\Program
    Files\Proc.Exe" you could use either of the first two commands below, but
    the third command would not work:

    [c:\] start /PGM "C:\Program Files\Proc.Exe"
    [c:\] start "test" "C:\Program Files\Proc.Exe"
    [c:\] start "C:\Program Files\Proc.Exe"

    START offers a large number of switches to control the session you start.
    In most cases you need only a few switches to accomplish what you want.
    The list below summarizes the most commonly used START options, and how
    you can use them to control the way a session is started:

    /MAX, /MIN, and /POS allow you to start a character-mode windowed
    session in a maximized window, a minimized window, or a window with
    a specified position and size. The default is to let the operating
    environment choose the position and size of the window.

    /C allows you to close the session when the command is finished
    (the default for DOS and OS/2 Presentation Manager sessions); /K
    allows you to keep the session open and go to a prompt (the default
    for OS/2 character mode sessions).

    /BG and /FG allow you to start the session in the background(does
    not respond to keystrokes until selected) or foreground (responds
    to keystrokes until deselected). /FG is the default if /DOS, /FS,
    /WIN, or /PM is used; otherwise, /BG is the default.

    /FS and /WIN control whether a character-mode session is started in
    full-screen or windowed mode. The default is to start a session of
    the same type as the current session, if the application can be run
    in such a session.

    START determines the application type automatically and starts the session
    in the appropriate mode.

    START gives you some flexibility in determining the session mode. For
    example, if the command is the name of a batch file (either a .BTM or .CMD
    file), you can use the /FS or /WIN options to run the batch file as part
    of a new session in either full-screen or windowed mode.

    However, you cannot start a session in a mode that is inappropriate for
    the application type. A DOS application cannot be run as part of a
    Presentation Manager session, for example, even if you use the /PM switch.
    Invalid or conflicting options will be ignored. 4OS2 will always attempt
    to run the command in the appropriate type of session.

    If the program is a DOS application or .BAT file, 4OS2 will start a new
    DOS session to run it. The DOS session will close itself automatically as
    soon as the program or batch file ends, unless /K is used. If you want
    the session to wait for a keystroke before it closes itself, you can use
    this syntax (assuming 4DOS is your command processor for OS/2 DOS
    sessions:

    [c:\] start /DOS command ^^ pause

    (Because the caret [^] is the default 4OS2 escape character, two carets
    must be used in order to pass one on to 4DOS as a command separator.)

    If you want to start a DOS command-line session in OS/2, you can use the
    command:

    [c:\] start /DOS

    You can specify settings for DOS and Windows sessions by using a settings
    options file, and loading it with the /DOS=, /WIN3=, or /WIN3S= option.
    This allows you to start DOS and Windows sessions with specific settings
    without creating a desktop object and modifying the settings manually.
    Before using this capability you should read the description of it under
    /DOS= (below) very carefully, since errors in the settings file can
    occasionally hang your system.

    Options

    /BG: (BackGround session) The session is started as a background
    session. /BG may be abbreviated to /B.

    /C: (Close) The session or window is closed when the
    application ends.

    /DOS[=filename]DOS session) Start a DOS session.

    If you include the =filename, OS/2 will load DOS settings
    from the specified file. When you use /DOS you can also
    alter the DOS settings for a session with environment
    variables of the form DosSetting.name=value, without using
    a settings file.

    Starting a session with specific DOS settings is an
    undocumented feature which was implemented within OS/2 with
    little error checking. It is included in START because it
    substantially eases a complex task, but you must experiment
    carefully to ensure that the settings you select will work
    properly on the systems on which you plan to use them.
    Incorrect settings may be ignored, but they may also hang
    your session or stop the entire system. Be sure your
    experiments are not conducted while critical tasks are in
    process.

    Each line in the file must have a name, an equal sign [=],
    and a value. The names are those shown in
    OS/2's DOS Settings dialog box. Do not use spaces on
    either side of the equal sign.

    The names in the DOS Settings dialog box will vary
    depending on the device drivers and other settings in your
    CONFIG.SYS file, though many are available on all systems.
    You must ensure that the names you use are valid for the
    systems on which you use them. For example, if you replace
    IBM's COM.SYS and VCOM.SYS with different communications
    drivers, the COM_ settings will probably not be valid for
    the new drivers. If you have a settings file which
    contains settings defined by a particular driver, and use
    it on a system where the corresponding driver is not
    loaded, the results are undefined.

    The values in your settings file must be numeric for
    settings which show a numeric value under DOS Settings
    (e.g., DOS_FILES=30), and must be text strings for settings
    shown with a string (e.g., DOS_SHELL=C:\4DOS.COM C:\4DOS
    /P). Strings should be entered without trailing blanks.
    For values shown as multiple choice on the DOS Settings
    page you must specify a numeric value, typically 0 for Off
    and 1 for On (e.g., DOS_HIGH=1). Items with choices other
    than Off and On may use different values, or may not work
    at all; experimentation is usually required to find out
    what works. Attempting to use strings for choice items
    (e.g., DOS_HIGH=ON) will not work, and can hang your
    system. This is due to the internal operation of OS/2,
    and is not a problem in 4OS2.

    A typical DOS settings file might look like this:

    DOS_FILES=30
    DOS_HIGH=1
    DOS_SHELL=C:\4DOS\4DOS.COM C:\4DOS /P
    MOUSE_EXCLUSIVE_ACCESS=0
    VIDEO_FASTPASTE=1

    You can include comments in a settings file by beginning
    any line with a colon [:].

    When you use /DOS you can also alter the DOS settings for a
    session with environment variables, without using a DOS
    settings file. When the =filename portion of the switch is
    not used, OS/2 will scan the environment looking for
    variables of the form DosSetting.name=value. Each such
    variable entry will be used to set the DOS setting with the
    specified name to the specified value. All of the cautions
    and restrictions given above for settings stored in a file
    apply equally to settings stored in environment variables.

    Settings stored in environment variables are "global" and
    apply to all sessions started with START /DOS, except when
    an explicit settings file is specified with =filename.

    /FG: (ForeGround session) Start the session as the foreground
    session. /FG may be abbreviated to /F.

    /FS: (Full Screen) Start the session as a full-screen session.

    /I: (Inherit environment) Inherit the default environment
    specified in CONFIG.SYS, if any, rather than the current
    environment.

    /ICON=filename :Use the specified icon file. If you don't use /ICON,
    the displayed icon will be the one found or assigned by
    OS/2.

    /INV: (Invisible) Start the session or window as invisible. No
    icon will appear and the session will only be accessible
    through the Task Manager or Window List.

    /K: (Keep session or window at end) The session or window
    continues after the application program ends. Use the EXIT
    command to end the session.

    /L: (Local lists) Start 4OS2 with local alias, history, and
    directory history lists. This option combines the effects
    of /LA, /LD, and /LH (below).

    /LA: (Local Alias list) Start 4OS2 with a local alias list.See
    ALIAS for information on local and global aliases.

    /LD: (Local Directory history) Start 4OS2 with a local directory
    history list. See Local and Global Directory History for
    more information.

    /LH: (Local History list) Start 4OS2 with a local history list.
    See Command History and Recall for information on local and
    global history lists.

    /MAX: (Maximized) Start the session or window maximized.

    /MIN: (Minimized) Start the session or window minimized.

    /N: (No command processor) Start an OS/2 program directly,
    without a command processor. The command cannot be an
    internal command or batch file. This is the default for PM
    applications.

    /PGM: (Program name) The string following this option is the
    program name. If you do not use /PGM, the first quoted
    string on the line will be used as the session and task
    list title, and not as the program name.

    /PM: (Presentation Manager) Start a program in the Presentation
    Manager session.

    /POS: (Position) Start the window at the specified screen
    position. The syntax is /POS=x, y, width, height where the
    values are specified in pixels or pels. x and y refer to
    the position of the top left corner of the window relative
    to the bottom left corner of the screen.

    /WAIT: Wait for the new session or window to finish before
    continuing. Cannot be used with /WIN3 or /WIN3S.

    /WIN: (Windowed) Start the session in a window.

    /WIN3[=filename]Windows enhanced mode) Run the program in an
    enhanced-mode Windows 3.x session. The session will run
    seamless (on the OS/2 desktop). To start a Windows
    application in full-screen mode, use /FS rather than /WIN3.
    You can include an equal sign and the name of an options
    file to set options for the specific session and
    application (see /DOS= above for details).

    /WIN3S[=filename]Windows standard mode) Equivalent to /WIN3, but runs
    the program in standard mode rather than enhanced mode.

    --
    -Rich Steiner >>>---> http://www.visi.com/~rsteiner >>>---> Smyrna, GA USA
    OS/2 + eCS + Linux + Win95 + DOS + PC/GEOS + Executor = PC Hobbyist Heaven!
    WARNING: I've seen FIELDATA FORTRAN V and I know how to use it!
    The Theorem Theorem: If If, Then Then.

  9. Re: modify dos-settings?

    On 15.01.05 23:39, Richard Steiner wrote:

    > Here in comp.os.os2.setup.misc, "R L"
    > spake unto us, saying:
    >
    >> But how can I modify the DOS settings for any DOS window started
    >> from an OS/2 batch file (.cmd)?

    >
    > The 4OS2 "START" command


    [STARTD]

    There exists a 3rd tool: Christian Langanke's STARTB, runs in DOS and
    OS/2 sessions, providing all DosStartSession features:

    o start a DOS session with optional DOS settings
    o specify a window position for the new session
    o specify an icon for the system menu of the new session
    o do not close a text window after termination (NOAUTOCLOSE)
    o wait for termination of the new session

    http://hobbes.nmsu.edu/pub/os2/util/system/strtb132.zip

    --
    Andreas Schnellbacher

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