SXGA with Snap? - OS2

This is a discussion on SXGA with Snap? - OS2 ; I've looked in the SNAP documentation for a clue that it will support SXGA (1280x1024) screen resolution, and did not find a direct answer. I'm thinking of ordering a new Thinkpad T61 with that resolution, thinking it will still work ...

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Thread: SXGA with Snap?

  1. SXGA with Snap?


    I've looked in the SNAP documentation for a clue that it will support SXGA
    (1280x1024) screen resolution, and did not find a direct answer.

    I'm thinking of ordering a new Thinkpad T61 with that resolution, thinking
    it will still work at XGA, (1024x768) leaving it a safer choice, the Wide
    screen models.

    I also figure the Intel X3100 and Nvidia chips are supported with Snap
    without all the features available.

    Feel free to correct me. Others probably want to know too.



  2. Re: SXGA with Snap?

    nolqmpkj@nospam.net wrote:
    > I've looked in the SNAP documentation for a clue that it will support SXGA
    > (1280x1024) screen resolution, and did not find a direct answer.


    It will support almost any resolution that your graphics adapter can
    generate. In most cases this is any arbitrary resolution up to the upper
    limit of your card. Yo can add it with the gamode tool.

    However, 1280*1024 is VESA standard and supported anyway.


    > I also figure the Intel X3100 and Nvidia chips are supported with Snap
    > without all the features available.


    That's much more important. You should avoid chipsets without an
    accelerated SNAP driver.
    I don't use either of the two above, so I don't know if they are supported.


    Marcel

  3. Re: SXGA with Snap?

    In <46faaf4c$0$30377$9b4e6d93@newsspool4.arcor-online.net>, on 09/26/2007
    at 09:13 PM, Marcel Müller said:



    >nolqmpkj@nospam.net wrote:
    >> I've looked in the SNAP documentation for a clue that it will support SXGA
    >> (1280x1024) screen resolution, and did not find a direct answer.


    >It will support almost any resolution that your graphics adapter can
    >generate. In most cases this is any arbitrary resolution up to the upper
    >limit of your card. Yo can add it with the gamode tool.


    >However, 1280*1024 is VESA standard and supported anyway.



    Thanks for the info.


    >> I also figure the Intel X3100 and Nvidia chips are supported with Snap
    >> without all the features available.


    >That's much more important. You should avoid chipsets without an
    >accelerated SNAP driver.



    That is not possible anymore, since SANP is not being developed.


    >I don't use either of the two above, so I don't know if they are
    >supported.



    >Marcel



  4. Re: SXGA with Snap?


    I have used Snap and SDD for many years yet it seems to have caused
    problems in both different types of video cards due to over clocking.
    I fitted heat sinks and fans to all my video cards cards
    the last being a NVIDIA G Force 400MX and it ran for 4 years before
    being unable to handle over clocking. (1800 x 1350 x 32 bit)
    After it's demise it was fine with standard drivers yet died when
    over clocked.I replaced the card and it then ran over clocked.
    I think you need to think about over clocking video cards as
    being similar to over clocking your CPU.

    I would not over clock a video card in a laptop.

    cheers Andrew.


    nolqmpkj@nospam.net wrote:
    > In <46faaf4c$0$30377$9b4e6d93@newsspool4.arcor-online.net>, on 09/26/2007
    > at 09:13 PM, Marcel Müller said:
    >
    >
    >
    >> nolqmpkj@nospam.net wrote:
    >>> I've looked in the SNAP documentation for a clue that it will support SXGA
    >>> (1280x1024) screen resolution, and did not find a direct answer.

    >
    >> It will support almost any resolution that your graphics adapter can
    >> generate. In most cases this is any arbitrary resolution up to the upper
    >> limit of your card. Yo can add it with the gamode tool.

    >
    >> However, 1280*1024 is VESA standard and supported anyway.

    >
    >
    > Thanks for the info.
    >
    >
    >>> I also figure the Intel X3100 and Nvidia chips are supported with Snap
    >>> without all the features available.

    >
    >> That's much more important. You should avoid chipsets without an
    >> accelerated SNAP driver.

    >
    >
    > That is not possible anymore, since SANP is not being developed.
    >
    >
    >> I don't use either of the two above, so I don't know if they are
    >> supported.

    >
    >
    >> Marcel

    >



  5. Re: SXGA with Snap?

    In <47006e04$0$12802$afc38c87@news.optusnet.com.au>, on 10/01/2007
    at 01:48 PM, Andrew said:




    >I have used Snap and SDD for many years yet it seems to have caused
    >problems in both different types of video cards due to over clocking. I
    >fitted heat sinks and fans to all my video cards cards
    >the last being a NVIDIA G Force 400MX and it ran for 4 years before being
    >unable to handle over clocking. (1800 x 1350 x 32 bit) After it's demise
    >it was fine with standard drivers yet died when over clocked.I replaced
    >the card and it then ran over clocked. I think you need to think about
    >over clocking video cards as being similar to over clocking your CPU.


    >I would not over clock a video card in a laptop.


    Thanks. I'll watch out for overclocking -- Not that I have any idea of
    how to overclock a video chip, or a computer for that matter.

    I don't think its an issue anyway, since I ordered a SXGA screen just to
    avoid issues with wide-screens and drivers. Especially since I could not
    get an answer on any questions I had on the ecs stuff from the supplier;
    e.g., another sale lost due to non-responsiveness.






    >cheers Andrew.



    >nolqmpkj@nospam.net wrote:
    >> In <46faaf4c$0$30377$9b4e6d93@newsspool4.arcor-online.net>, on 09/26/2007
    >> at 09:13 PM, Marcel Müller said:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>> nolqmpkj@nospam.net wrote:
    >>>> I've looked in the SNAP documentation for a clue that it will support SXGA
    >>>> (1280x1024) screen resolution, and did not find a direct answer.

    >>
    >>> It will support almost any resolution that your graphics adapter can
    >>> generate. In most cases this is any arbitrary resolution up to the upper
    >>> limit of your card. Yo can add it with the gamode tool.

    >>
    >>> However, 1280*1024 is VESA standard and supported anyway.

    >>
    >>
    >> Thanks for the info.
    >>
    >>
    >>>> I also figure the Intel X3100 and Nvidia chips are supported with Snap
    >>>> without all the features available.

    >>
    >>> That's much more important. You should avoid chipsets without an
    >>> accelerated SNAP driver.

    >>
    >>
    >> That is not possible anymore, since SANP is not being developed.
    >>
    >>
    >>> I don't use either of the two above, so I don't know if they are
    >>> supported.

    >>
    >>
    >>> Marcel

    >>




  6. Re: SXGA with Snap?

    lpjkqmon@nospam.net wrote:
    > In <47006e04$0$12802$afc38c87@news.optusnet.com.au>, on 10/01/2007
    > at 01:48 PM, Andrew said:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >> I have used Snap and SDD for many years yet it seems to have caused
    >> problems in both different types of video cards due to over clocking. I
    >> fitted heat sinks and fans to all my video cards cards
    >> the last being a NVIDIA G Force 400MX and it ran for 4 years before being
    >> unable to handle over clocking. (1800 x 1350 x 32 bit) After it's demise
    >> it was fine with standard drivers yet died when over clocked.I replaced
    >> the card and it then ran over clocked. I think you need to think about
    >> over clocking video cards as being similar to over clocking your CPU.

    >
    >> I would not over clock a video card in a laptop.

    >
    > Thanks. I'll watch out for overclocking -- Not that I have any idea of
    > how to overclock a video chip, or a computer for that matter.
    >
    > I don't think its an issue anyway, since I ordered a SXGA screen just to
    > avoid issues with wide-screens and drivers. Especially since I could not
    > get an answer on any questions I had on the ecs stuff from the supplier;
    > e.g., another sale lost due to non-responsiveness.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >> cheers Andrew.

    >
    >
    >> nolqmpkj@nospam.net wrote:
    >>> In <46faaf4c$0$30377$9b4e6d93@newsspool4.arcor-online.net>, on 09/26/2007
    >>> at 09:13 PM, Marcel Müller said:

    Scitech/SDD get their high performance from running the video
    chip as fast as possible, when they run in "GEN" mode they are
    running at the standard speed for the video card from their literature.
    If you can run it at the needed refresh rates in "GEN" mode you are fine.
    cheers Andrew.


    >>>
    >>>> nolqmpkj@nospam.net wrote:
    >>>>> I've looked in the SNAP documentation for a clue that it will support SXGA
    >>>>> (1280x1024) screen resolution, and did not find a direct answer.
    >>>> It will support almost any resolution that your graphics adapter can
    >>>> generate. In most cases this is any arbitrary resolution up to the upper
    >>>> limit of your card. Yo can add it with the gamode tool.
    >>>> However, 1280*1024 is VESA standard and supported anyway.
    >>>
    >>> Thanks for the info.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>> I also figure the Intel X3100 and Nvidia chips are supported with Snap
    >>>>> without all the features available.
    >>>> That's much more important. You should avoid chipsets without an
    >>>> accelerated SNAP driver.
    >>>
    >>> That is not possible anymore, since SANP is not being developed.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> I don't use either of the two above, so I don't know if they are
    >>>> supported.
    >>>
    >>>> Marcel

    >
    >


  7. Re: SXGA with Snap?

    In <4701d05a$0$7087$afc38c87@news.optusnet.com.au>, on 10/02/2007
    at 03:00 PM, Andrew said:



    >lpjkqmon@nospam.net wrote:
    >> In <47006e04$0$12802$afc38c87@news.optusnet.com.au>, on 10/01/2007
    >> at 01:48 PM, Andrew said:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>> I have used Snap and SDD for many years yet it seems to have caused
    >>> problems in both different types of video cards due to over clocking. I
    >>> fitted heat sinks and fans to all my video cards cards
    >>> the last being a NVIDIA G Force 400MX and it ran for 4 years before being
    >>> unable to handle over clocking. (1800 x 1350 x 32 bit) After it's demise
    >>> it was fine with standard drivers yet died when over clocked.I replaced
    >>> the card and it then ran over clocked. I think you need to think about
    >>> over clocking video cards as being similar to over clocking your CPU.

    >>
    >>> I would not over clock a video card in a laptop.

    >>
    >> Thanks. I'll watch out for overclocking -- Not that I have any idea of
    >> how to overclock a video chip, or a computer for that matter.
    >>
    >> I don't think its an issue anyway, since I ordered a SXGA screen just to
    >> avoid issues with wide-screens and drivers. Especially since I could not
    >> get an answer on any questions I had on the ecs stuff from the supplier;
    >> e.g., another sale lost due to non-responsiveness.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>> cheers Andrew.

    >>
    >>
    >>> nolqmpkj@nospam.net wrote:
    >>>> In <46faaf4c$0$30377$9b4e6d93@newsspool4.arcor-online.net>, on 09/26/2007
    >>>> at 09:13 PM, Marcel Müller said:

    >Scitech/SDD get their high performance from running the video chip as
    >fast as possible, when they run in "GEN" mode they are running at the
    >standard speed for the video card from their literature. If you can run
    >it at the needed refresh rates in "GEN" mode you are fine.
    > cheers Andrew.




    Thanks for that bit of information. I'll check/change my installation.




    >>>>
    >>>>> nolqmpkj@nospam.net wrote:
    >>>>>> I've looked in the SNAP documentation for a clue that it will support SXGA
    >>>>>> (1280x1024) screen resolution, and did not find a direct answer.
    >>>>> It will support almost any resolution that your graphics adapter can
    >>>>> generate. In most cases this is any arbitrary resolution up to the upper
    >>>>> limit of your card. Yo can add it with the gamode tool.
    >>>>> However, 1280*1024 is VESA standard and supported anyway.
    >>>>
    >>>> Thanks for the info.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>> I also figure the Intel X3100 and Nvidia chips are supported with Snap
    >>>>>> without all the features available.
    >>>>> That's much more important. You should avoid chipsets without an
    >>>>> accelerated SNAP driver.
    >>>>
    >>>> That is not possible anymore, since SANP is not being developed.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>> I don't use either of the two above, so I don't know if they are
    >>>>> supported.
    >>>>
    >>>>> Marcel

    >>
    >>



  8. Re: SXGA with Snap?

    On Tue, 2 Oct 2007 04:00:12 UTC in comp.os.os2.misc, Andrew
    wrote:

    > Scitech/SDD get their high performance from running the video
    > chip as fast as possible, when they run in "GEN" mode they are
    > running at the standard speed for the video card from their literature.
    > If you can run it at the needed refresh rates in "GEN" mode you are fine.


    I do not believe that SNAP overclocks a video card at all. The difference
    between GEN and SDD is that Gengradd uses only VESA features and is *slow* where
    SDD uses the hardware acceleration features built into the various chipsets.
    This is not the same as overclocking and would not damage a chip in any way.

    --
    Trevor Hemsley, Brighton, UK
    Trevor dot Hemsley at ntlworld dot com

  9. Re: SXGA with Snap?

    Andrew wrote:
    > Scitech/SDD get their high performance from running the video
    > chip as fast as possible, when they run in "GEN" mode they are
    > running at the standard speed for the video card from their literature.
    > If you can run it at the needed refresh rates in "GEN" mode you are fine.
    > cheers Andrew.


    This is not true at all. SDD attempts to figure out from the hardware
    what the memory clock should be and will honor it. If their is no way
    to know from the hardware, they will program it to a rate that they know
    is safe and correct for the given PCI ID. The only times SDD/SNAP has
    ever overclocked a chipset has been by a mistake in their driver (which
    was usually quickly corrected), a user override (using GAMEMCLK.EXE), or
    because a different chipset happened to share a PCI ID with another
    chipset which is clocked differently. Overclocking has never been done
    by Scitech by default on purpose.

    Performance gain is because of several factors, like enabling write
    combining, and supporting accelerated blits for scrolling text, full
    window drag, etc.

    GENGRADD has nothing to do with Scitech, and makes no attempt to program
    the memory clock at all. The Scitech drivers can be made to run in this
    way too.

    --
    [Reverse the parts of the e-mail address to reply.]

  10. Re: SXGA with Snap?


    I should have said that one of the factors of Sdd/Scitech was running
    the video card as fast as specified yet some chips are fitted with
    heat sinks and fans while other cards have no sinks or fans.
    Different manufacturers run the chips at different speeds and if they
    are not producing much heat a dollar is saved to avoid sinking heat away.

    I am talking from my own experience and I doubt it is just coincidence,
    on one card without a sink it was too hot for me to have my finger on
    the reverse side of the chip. This usually equates to <80c and puts
    chips in a very short life span mode. Heat is one of the most important
    parameters for semiconductor life spans.




    Marty wrote:
    > Andrew wrote:
    >> Scitech/SDD get their high performance from running the video
    >> chip as fast as possible, when they run in "GEN" mode they are
    >> running at the standard speed for the video card from their literature.
    >> If you can run it at the needed refresh rates in "GEN" mode you are fine.
    >> cheers Andrew.

    >
    > This is not true at all. SDD attempts to figure out from the hardware
    > what the memory clock should be and will honor it. If their is no way
    > to know from the hardware, they will program it to a rate that they know
    > is safe and correct for the given PCI ID. The only times SDD/SNAP has
    > ever overclocked a chipset has been by a mistake in their driver (which
    > was usually quickly corrected), a user override (using GAMEMCLK.EXE), or
    > because a different chipset happened to share a PCI ID with another
    > chipset which is clocked differently. Overclocking has never been done
    > by Scitech by default on purpose.
    >
    > Performance gain is because of several factors, like enabling write
    > combining, and supporting accelerated blits for scrolling text, full
    > window drag, etc.
    >
    > GENGRADD has nothing to do with Scitech, and makes no attempt to program
    > the memory clock at all. The Scitech drivers can be made to run in this
    > way too.
    >



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