Peer review please - OS2

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  1. Peer review please


    I will be grateful if the million man years (sorry Daniella) of IT experience in
    this forum can be brought to review my explanation to high school students of
    the how and why of the evolution of fashions in software technology.

    "As the electronic digital computer changed the existing electro-mechanical IT
    environment, the fashion in analysis and programming also changed. Initially
    there was the functional or procedural fashion. In those days computers were
    purchased to crunch numbers, and the procedure was all that mattered.

    When improved magnetic technology enabled hard disks to supersede tape drives,
    the nexus between data entry and drive mounting was broken; enabling
    asynchronous entry of massive amounts of data for use in expanded tasks. The
    procedural fashion had difficulty keeping track of the extra data, and the
    normalised relational (database) fashion evolved to do this.

    When fiber optic cables enabled packet switching networks (e.g. the Internet) to
    reach every corner of the globe (sic.), then individual businesses grew in size
    through merger and acquisition. The merging of two IT departments each
    employing different hardware and software for similar but different tasks was a
    cataclysmic challenge to those of the two departments who retained jobs in the
    new department. By this time, Object Technology had a solid base in GUI
    programming for computer simulation, and each of its proponents claimed that
    their flavour of it would solve the problems of business by enabling business
    datasets from various sources to by plugged, played and reused as easily as Lego
    bricks.

    I have not heard the jury's finding."




  2. Re: Peer review please

    In , on 07/28/2007
    at 12:13 AM, johnsuth@nospam.com.au said:

    >I will be grateful if the million man years (sorry Daniella) of IT
    >experience in this forum can be brought to review my explanation to
    >high school students of the how and why of the evolution of fashions
    >in software technology.


    I see some significant omissions. The transition from entry of
    programs in machine language to the use of assemblers was as major as
    anything that you mentioned, as was the advent of high level
    languages. Similarly, the data base software before the advent of
    relational data bases was important.

    A few nits:

    >In those days computers were purchased to crunch numbers, and the
    >procedure was all that mattered.


    There was a divide between the scientific and commercial worlds. What
    you say was true for scientific and engineering applications, but the
    business world was dominated by file management tasks such as sorting
    and merging.

    >When improved magnetic technology enabled hard disks to supersede
    >tape drives, the nexus between data entry and drive mounting was
    >broken;


    The DASD landscape was dominated by removable disks for quite a while,
    with the 1311 on the 1401/1440/1460 and the 2311, 2314 and 3330[1] on
    the S/360 and S/370. It was only with the advent of the 3380 that
    removable disks started disappearing, although the trend had started
    as early as the 3350 days.

    >When fiber optic cables enabled packet switching networks (e.g. the
    >Internet)


    ObGrammar There should be a comma after "e.g.".

    >reach every corner of the globe (sic.),


    The should not be a period after "sic", and IAC it appears
    inapplicable. It's a latin word used as a typographer's mark to
    indicate text that should be set as written (hence "sic"), and I see
    nothing in your sentence to require such instructions.

    >The merging of two IT departments each employing different hardware
    >and software for similar but different tasks was a cataclysmic
    >challenge to those of the two departments who retained jobs in the
    >new department. By this time, Object Technology had a solid base in
    >GUI programming


    The mergers started long before the OO and GUI eras, with the advent
    of the S/360. Object technology existed long before[2] the GUI era,
    and, if anything, it was the GUI software that was based on Object
    Technology.

    [1] AFAIK the 3340 never had significant market penetration.

    [2] Arguably with Simula, and certainly with SmallTalkŪ.

    --
    Shmuel (Seymour J.) Metz, SysProg and JOAT

    Unsolicited bulk E-mail subject to legal action. I reserve the
    right to publicly post or ridicule any abusive E-mail. Reply to
    domain Patriot dot net user shmuel+news to contact me. Do not
    reply to spamtrap@library.lspace.org


  3. Re: Peer review please

    In article <46acb09b$11$fuzhry+tra$mr2ice@news.patriot.net>
    spamtrap@library.lspace.org.invalid "Seymour J." writes:

    > The should not be a period after "sic", and IAC it appears
    > inapplicable. It's a latin word used as a typographer's mark to
    > indicate text that should be set as written (hence "sic"),
    > [...]


    If it helps, Latin's "sic" means "thus".
    --
    Andrew Stephenson


  4. Re: Peer review please

    johnsuth@nospam.com.au wrote:
    >
    > When fiber optic cables enabled packet switching networks (e.g. the Internet) to
    > reach every corner of the globe (sic.), then individual businesses grew in size
    > through merger and acquisition.
    >

    Packet switching networks existed long before fiber optics became the
    preferred backbone technology. Satellites provide much of the
    international connection.
    The use of "sic" is curious. I thought it referred the reader to an
    earlier quotation or footnote.

    --
    jmm (hyphen) list (at) sohnen-moe (dot) com
    (Remove .AXSPAMGN for email)

  5. Re: Peer review please

    On Tue, 31 Jul 2007 09:01:27 -0400, Andrew Stephenson wrote
    (in article <1185886887snz@deltrak.demon.co.uk>):

    > In article <46acb09b$11$fuzhry+tra$mr2ice@news.patriot.net>
    > spamtrap@library.lspace.org.invalid "Seymour J." writes:
    >
    >> The should not be a period after "sic", and IAC it appears
    >> inapplicable. It's a latin word used as a typographer's mark to
    >> indicate text that should be set as written (hence "sic"),
    >> [...]

    >
    > If it helps, Latin's "sic" means "thus".


    And is generally used to signal that an error in quoted text is reproduced as
    it appeared in the original.

    --
    John Varela
    Trade NEW lamps for OLD for email.


  6. Re: Peer review please

    On Fri, 27 Jul 2007 20:13:25 -0400, johnsuth@nospam.com.au wrote
    (in article ):

    > I will be grateful if the million man years (sorry Daniella) of IT experience


    > in this forum can be brought to review my explanation to high school students


    > of the how and why of the evolution of fashions in software technology.


    It needs a lot of work. The principal problem is that you're trying to
    compress too much history into too few words, and as others are pointing out
    it appears that you're not all that familiar with the history. More research
    is needed.

    Stylistically, the language is too dense. The sentences are too long and
    terms like "nexus" and "normalized relational" will put high school students
    to sleep. Also, there are odd things like "(sic.)", which would make no
    sense where it is even if the period were removed, and the parentheses around
    "(database)".

    --
    John Varela
    Trade NEW lamps for OLD for email.


  7. Re: Peer review please

    On Tue, 31 Jul 2007 17:53:30 UTC, Jim Moe
    wrote:

    > The use of "sic" is curious. I thought it referred the reader to an
    > earlier quotation or footnote.


    No, that would be _ibid._ (ibidem) meaning *exactly* the same reference as
    in the *immediately* preceding note.

    Or loc. cit, the location cited, meaning exactly the reference cited from
    the same author in some earlier footnote, and requiring the author's name
    (or whatever) so that you can see _which_ note is referred to.

    Or maybe op. cit., meaning the cited work, which requires you to give the
    author and the specific page reference or whatever, but not to name the
    publication, because it's the same one as before.

    However, no one understands this stuff any more, and a student who uses
    one of them correctly is likely to be *corrected* by the instructor. (Ask
    my daughter about that.) I believe, in fact, that the bozos currently in
    charge of some formal scholarly standards have deprecated one or more of
    these -- in the computerese sense, that is.

    Anyone want to get started on i.e and e.g.? I think they too are
    academically incorrect these days, on the excellent principle that
    literacy should not be necessary in reading one's work.

    --
    Dan Drake
    dd@dandrake.com
    http://www.dandrake.com/
    porlockjr.blogspot.com

  8. Re: Peer review please

    On Sat, 28 Jul 2007 00:13:25 UTC, johnsuth@nospam.com.au wrote:

    >
    > I will be grateful if the million man years (sorry Daniella) of IT experience in
    > this forum can be brought to review my explanation to high school students of
    > the how and why of the evolution of fashions in software technology...


    Meanwhile, to the point: The connections are there, but I think the causal
    connections are overstated.

    Certainly the relational model could not come into use until everyone had
    what were then considered to be big, fast disks.

    When I first ran into the object model, though, and for some years after,
    it wasn't in any context of smooshing together incompatible systems after
    a merger. It was a superior method for writing and maintaining large
    programs of any sort (as was structured programming before it). I'm
    talking late 1970s here, iirc, when I heard about the new model that
    [whoever] had thought of when contemplating Simula. The advantages
    included its application to making reusable libraries, which it made much
    easier and more practical, though still, of course, much harder and more
    cumbersome than we all wanted to believe it would be.

    Just one person's anecdotal non-data.

    --
    Dan Drake
    dd@dandrake.com
    http://www.dandrake.com/
    porlockjr.blogspot.com

  9. Re: Peer review please

    In , on 07/31/2007
    at 08:19 PM, "Dan Drake" said:

    >However, no one understands this stuff any more, and a student who
    >uses one of them correctly is likely to be *corrected* by the
    >instructor. (Ask my daughter about that.)


    I wish that I could tell you that you were wrong. :-(

    >Anyone want to get started on i.e and e.g.? I think they too are
    >academically incorrect these days,


    I don't know whether that is true, but I can assure you that lots of
    people use them incorrectly.

    --
    Shmuel (Seymour J.) Metz, SysProg and JOAT

    Unsolicited bulk E-mail subject to legal action. I reserve the
    right to publicly post or ridicule any abusive E-mail. Reply to
    domain Patriot dot net user shmuel+news to contact me. Do not
    reply to spamtrap@library.lspace.org


  10. Re: Peer review please

    On 07/31/07 02:44 pm John Varela wrote:

    >>> The should not be a period after "sic", and IAC it appears
    >>> inapplicable. It's a latin word used as a typographer's mark to
    >>> indicate text that should be set as written (hence "sic"),
    >>> [...]

    >> If it helps, Latin's "sic" means "thus".


    > And is generally used to signal that an error in quoted text is reproduced as
    > it appeared in the original.



    In this case it would have been better if "every corner of the globe"
    had been in quotation marks, with "sic" indicating: "They really did
    say/write this, even though a globe has no corners."

    Perce

  11. Re: Peer review please

    In , "Percival P. Cassidy" writes:
    >On 07/31/07 02:44 pm John Varela wrote:
    >
    >>>> The should not be a period after "sic", and IAC it appears
    >>>> inapplicable. It's a latin word used as a typographer's mark to
    >>>> indicate text that should be set as written (hence "sic"),
    >>>> [...]
    >>> If it helps, Latin's "sic" means "thus".

    >
    >> And is generally used to signal that an error in quoted text is reproduced as
    >> it appeared in the original.

    >
    >
    >In this case it would have been better if "every corner of the globe"
    >had been in quotation marks, with "sic" indicating: "They really did
    >say/write this, even though a globe has no corners."



    Yes, quotation marks would have made it clear.


    Thanks all for your comments.



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