Back Again/2 - OS2

This is a discussion on Back Again/2 - OS2 ; A long time ago in a galaxy far away ... Indelible Blue had a deal on a Seagate TR-4 tape drive (CTT8000-S) and BackAgain/2 software. It was a great backup solution. Years later I'm on later versions of Windows and ...

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Thread: Back Again/2

  1. Back Again/2


    A long time ago in a galaxy far away ...


    Indelible Blue had a deal on a Seagate TR-4 tape drive (CTT8000-S) and
    BackAgain/2 software. It was a great backup solution.

    Years later I'm on later versions of Windows and Linux. Recently I
    moved the drive over to a Linux box to try to scrape the raw data off of
    the old OS/2 tapes. That worked, and now I have a large file for each
    tape that has a binary dump of the data on the tape.

    Next, I would like to find a utility (or write it) to parse the data on
    the tape so that I can extract any files that I need. Does anybody know
    if such a utility exists already?

    I'm assuming that it doesn't, so the next question is does anybody know
    what happened to the OS/2 version of BackAgain/2 ?

    It looks like the company that created it sold the Windows (can I say
    that here?) versions of BackAgain/2 to another company, and the OS/2
    versions are conspicuously absent. :-(


    Mike

  2. Re: Back Again/2

    On Tue, 16 Jan 2007 01:33:50 UTC, Mike wrote:

    >
    > A long time ago in a galaxy far away ...
    >
    >
    > Indelible Blue had a deal on a Seagate TR-4 tape drive (CTT8000-S) and
    > BackAgain/2 software. It was a great backup solution.
    >
    > Years later I'm on later versions of Windows and Linux. Recently I
    > moved the drive over to a Linux box to try to scrape the raw data off of
    > the old OS/2 tapes. That worked, and now I have a large file for each
    > tape that has a binary dump of the data on the tape.
    >
    > Next, I would like to find a utility (or write it) to parse the data on
    > the tape so that I can extract any files that I need. Does anybody know
    > if such a utility exists already?
    >
    > I'm assuming that it doesn't, so the next question is does anybody know
    > what happened to the OS/2 version of BackAgain/2 ?
    >
    > It looks like the company that created it sold the Windows (can I say
    > that here?) versions of BackAgain/2 to another company, and the OS/2
    > versions are conspicuously absent. :-(


    You got that right. From what I know about it, Keller group still owns
    the OS/2 version, but has buried it.

    The best way to do that (if it will work), is to run the old
    BackAgain/2 for OS/2. If you don't have a copy, someone will, likely,
    send it to you (who me?), and there are keys posted, somewhere, on the
    web to enable various features (sorry, I don't have those myself), but
    restore will, likely, work, without the keys (perhaps only the command
    line restore, and perhaps not from tape).

    Be aware, that you might have better luck extracting data from the
    tapes, rather than from the files that you extracted (especially if
    the files are over 2 GiB).

    > Mike


    Hope this helps...
    --
    From the eComStation 1.2 of Doug Bissett
    dougb007 at telus dot net
    (Please make the obvious changes, to e-mail me)


  3. Re: Back Again/2

    On 01/15/07 08:33 pm Mike wrote:

    > A long time ago in a galaxy far away ...
    >
    >
    > Indelible Blue had a deal on a Seagate TR-4 tape drive (CTT8000-S) and
    > BackAgain/2 software. It was a great backup solution.
    >
    > Years later I'm on later versions of Windows and Linux. Recently I
    > moved the drive over to a Linux box to try to scrape the raw data off of
    > the old OS/2 tapes. That worked, and now I have a large file for each
    > tape that has a binary dump of the data on the tape.
    >
    > Next, I would like to find a utility (or write it) to parse the data on
    > the tape so that I can extract any files that I need. Does anybody know
    > if such a utility exists already?
    >
    > I'm assuming that it doesn't, so the next question is does anybody know
    > what happened to the OS/2 version of BackAgain/2 ?
    >
    > It looks like the company that created it sold the Windows (can I say
    > that here?) versions of BackAgain/2 to another company, and the OS/2
    > versions are conspicuously absent. :-(


    To my mind, the words "TR-4" and "great" do not belong in the same
    sentence. Well, OK, you used separate sentences, but the sense was the
    same. Reason: the tapes were outrageously expensive compared to DAT.

    Anyhow . . . I think you will have to use BA/2 rather than the later
    BA/2000, as -- IIRC -- the latest version of BA/2000 no longer read BA/2
    tapes.

    Hobbes still has a demo version of BA/2 Professional ver. 4, and I am
    almost certain that there is no capacity limit when restoring with the
    demo version (backups were limited to 50MB).

    http://hobbes.nmsu.edu/pub/os2/util/backup/ba2pr40d.zip

    HTH

    Perce

  4. Re: Back Again/2


    You are right, the TR-4 tapes were expensive, and it was consumer gear,
    not professional quality. Then again, there are very few tape drives
    that I would depend on.

    I am tempted to install OS/2 and BA/2, but not the tape drive. If the
    raw data that I pulled off the tapes is in the same format as it would
    have been if I had backed up to a file, then I'm in luck. Otherwise, I
    guess I'm going to have to run the tapes one more time (with fingers
    crossed).

    My version was licensed. Hopefully I wrote the keys down somewhere
    where I can still find them. :-)


    Mike

  5. Re: Back Again/2

    On 01/17/07 12:03 am Mike wrote:

    > You are right, the TR-4 tapes were expensive, and it was consumer gear,
    > not professional quality. Then again, there are very few tape drives
    > that I would depend on.


    DAT/DDSx tapes seemed to be intended for industrial-strength backups,
    although they have now been superseded, it seems, by AIT or DLT. Whether
    that's because the DAT/DDS technology was inferior or simply because the
    later types have greater capacity I don't know. But AFAIK all
    industrial-strength backup solutions involve magnetic tape.

    Even DDS4 tapes hold 20GB without compression, and autoloaders permit
    *large* unattended backups.

    Perce

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