Re: SSI finally writes a good news release - OS2

This is a discussion on Re: SSI finally writes a good news release - OS2 ; David T. Johnson wrote: > I don't know if 'eCS v2.0' will be any good but the press release for > it's beta is easily the best one that I've ever seen come out of > 'Serenity Systems International.' > ...

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Thread: Re: SSI finally writes a good news release

  1. Re: SSI finally writes a good news release

    David T. Johnson wrote:
    > I don't know if 'eCS v2.0' will be any good but the press release for
    > it's beta is easily the best one that I've ever seen come out of
    > 'Serenity Systems International.'
    >
    > http://www.prnewswire.com/news/index...4245833&EDATE=


    Don't get too gooey-eyed. The Boob broke down and hired a PR service
    to do it (and admits so in the eCS Forums). eCS Lusers are already
    asking about SVista (which is a dead product since the developer pulled
    out) and asking Boob if there is news there since he mentions it so
    prominently in the release. His answer: No, there isn't.

    You can add to this the fact that no respectable (actually none so far)
    computer reporting entities have acted on the "news". I don't imagine
    too many in the computer news business would find anything about eCS
    very newsworthy. When you pay for PR services you're intent there is
    to reach a new audience - which so far isn't there. Look as tho' The
    Boob is desperate for some attention and some sales.

    OTOH, the new Intel based IMacs are really looking good. I'm looking
    to buy two new office computers and a third personal. May just go with
    the top-O-line Imac and a full G5.

    --
    Dr. Timothy Martin, The Official and Only OS/2 Guy
    Warp City Web Site - http://www.warpcity.com
    email: OS2Guy@Gmail.com OR eCSGuy@Gmail.com


  2. Re: SSI finally writes a good news release

    The OS2 Guy wrote:
    > David T. Johnson wrote:
    >
    >>I don't know if 'eCS v2.0' will be any good but the press release for
    >>it's beta is easily the best one that I've ever seen come out of
    >>'Serenity Systems International.'
    >>
    >>http://www.prnewswire.com/news/index...4245833&EDATE=

    >
    >
    > Don't get too gooey-eyed. The Boob broke down and hired a PR service
    > to do it (and admits so in the eCS Forums).


    Well, I'm glad to see a better PR effort. In the past, BSJ's
    'marketing' has tended to focus on cannibalization rather than
    evangelization so maybe that is changing, at least for this news
    release. I'd like to keep using OS/2 as long as possible so if there
    are some actual honest-to-goodness NEW 'eCS' users there might be a few
    crumbs of new driver support that trickle down to the surviving OS/2
    users.

    > eCS Lusers are already
    > asking about SVista (which is a dead product since the developer pulled
    > out) and asking Boob if there is news there since he mentions it so
    > prominently in the release. His answer: No, there isn't.
    >
    > You can add to this the fact that no respectable (actually none so far)
    > computer reporting entities have acted on the "news". I don't imagine
    > too many in the computer news business would find anything about eCS
    > very newsworthy. When you pay for PR services you're intent there is
    > to reach a new audience - which so far isn't there. Look as tho' The
    > Boob is desperate for some attention and some sales.
    >
    > OTOH, the new Intel based IMacs are really looking good. I'm looking
    > to buy two new office computers and a third personal. May just go with
    > the top-O-line Imac and a full G5.
    >


    I've never liked the Mac platform very much, starting with the first Mac
    which didn't have an eject button for the floppy disk so that you had to
    stick a paper clip in a little hole to get the disk out if the software
    eject didn't work. The Mac platform is too closed and too proprietary
    IMO. For example, how do you back up your stuff on a new Mac? Recent
    studies show that CD-R s and CD-RWs have a life of only 2-5 years so
    what do you use on a Mac? Probably the only thing you can use is a USB
    2.0 drive plugged into it and I'm not even sure about that. And lets
    say you backup on a USB drive with some Apple proprietary format. What
    will be able to read it 5 years from now? Probably, you will have to
    find an old Mac to boot up and read it, then convert it to some new
    format. Everything about Mac has to be 'their way or nothing' and that
    gets tiresome and difficult. For example, Apple has been plugging
    firewire pretty hard based on its merits but the entire world is
    standardizing on USB. Apple is always out in left field on stuff. Now,
    they have just moved to Intel chips at a time when AMD is making better
    stuff, just like they moved to Motorola right before Intel started
    making better stuff. Also, the platform is constantly changing so that
    the stuff you used in the past seldom works in the present. Even
    Windows does better on that than Mac, although they both fall far short
    of OS/2.
    --
    Posted with OS/2 Warp 4.52
    and IBM Web Browser v2.0.5

  3. Re: SSI finally writes a good news release

    In <11sd3cf9jggri47@corp.supernews.com>, on 01/12/2006
    at 09:12 AM, "David T. Johnson" said:



    > The OS2 Guy wrote:
    >> David T. Johnson wrote:
    >>
    >>>I don't know if 'eCS v2.0' will be any good but the press release for
    >>>it's beta is easily the best one that I've ever seen come out of
    >>>'Serenity Systems International.'
    >>>
    >>>http://www.prnewswire.com/news/index...4245833&EDATE=

    >>
    >>
    >> Don't get too gooey-eyed. The Boob broke down and hired a PR service
    >> to do it (and admits so in the eCS Forums).


    >Well, I'm glad to see a better PR effort. In the past, BSJ's
    >'marketing' has tended to focus on cannibalization rather than
    >evangelization so maybe that is changing, at least for this news
    >release. I'd like to keep using OS/2 as long as possible so if there
    >are some actual honest-to-goodness NEW 'eCS' users there might be a few
    >crumbs of new driver support that trickle down to the surviving OS/2
    >users.


    >> eCS Lusers are already
    >> asking about SVista (which is a dead product since the developer pulled
    >> out) and asking Boob if there is news there since he mentions it so
    >> prominently in the release. His answer: No, there isn't.
    >>
    >> You can add to this the fact that no respectable (actually none so far)
    >> computer reporting entities have acted on the "news". I don't imagine
    >> too many in the computer news business would find anything about eCS
    >> very newsworthy. When you pay for PR services you're intent there is
    >> to reach a new audience - which so far isn't there. Look as tho' The
    >> Boob is desperate for some attention and some sales.
    >>
    >> OTOH, the new Intel based IMacs are really looking good. I'm looking
    >> to buy two new office computers and a third personal. May just go with
    >> the top-O-line Imac and a full G5.
    >>


    >I've never liked the Mac platform very much, starting with the first Mac
    >which didn't have an eject button for the floppy disk so that you had to
    >stick a paper clip in a little hole to get the disk out if the software
    >eject didn't work. The Mac platform is too closed and too proprietary
    >IMO. For example, how do you back up your stuff on a new Mac? Recent
    >studies show that CD-R s and CD-RWs have a life of only 2-5 years so
    >what do you use on a Mac? Probably the only thing you can use is a USB
    >2.0 drive plugged into it and I'm not even sure about that.


    As a side topic, I'd like to see a network storage drive that could be
    plugged into a router and used under OS2, but I haven't found any. There
    are several that run under windows. Do you have any knowledge on these?







    And lets
    >say you backup on a USB drive with some Apple proprietary format. What
    >will be able to read it 5 years from now? Probably, you will have to
    >find an old Mac to boot up and read it, then convert it to some new
    >format. Everything about Mac has to be 'their way or nothing' and that
    >gets tiresome and difficult. For example, Apple has been plugging
    >firewire pretty hard based on its merits but the entire world is
    >standardizing on USB. Apple is always out in left field on stuff. Now,
    >they have just moved to Intel chips at a time when AMD is making better
    >stuff, just like they moved to Motorola right before Intel started
    >making better stuff. Also, the platform is constantly changing so that
    >the stuff you used in the past seldom works in the present. Even
    >Windows does better on that than Mac, although they both fall far short
    >of OS/2.




  4. Network Attached Storage (was Re: SSI finally writes a good newsrelease



    letoured@nospam.net wrote:

    >
    > As a side topic, I'd like to see a network storage drive that could be
    > plugged into a router and used under OS2, but I haven't found any. There
    > are several that run under windows. Do you have any knowledge on these?


    Short answer: Iomega Network Harddrive seems to work

    Longer answer: "Network Storage Drives" are generally called NAS
    (Network Attached Storage) devices. They simply plug into an Ethernet
    port at the central router or switch and can then be accessed by all
    connected workstations. To achieve this, they need to "export their
    storage capacity" onto the LAN somehow. This is done via a network
    protocol, most of the time plain netbios or netbios over TCP/IP. If
    netbios, OS/2 should be able to connect without too much trouble. If
    Netbios over TCP/IP, a SAMBA client should be used. There is a free
    samba plugin for NetDrive available from netlabs.org. In most cases the
    administration is web based, no problem for OS/2. Also, most devices
    also offer FTP access, also no problem for OS/2.

    The only important thing that people should keep in mind when buying
    such a device is that the vendor supports open standards and doesn't
    ship with their own driver for the device. Generally, if the device has
    support for Win32/Linux/Mac it should support open standards and OS/2
    can use it; most likely through the samba plugin for NetDrive.

  5. Re: SSI finally writes a good news release

    Users report about success with:
    * Linksys NSLU2 (Networked storage device) --
    http://en.ecomstation.ru/hardware.ph...on=item&id=390
    * SimpleTech Simpleshare STI-NAS/160 (Network Attached Storage) --
    http://en.ecomstation.ru/hardware.ph...on=item&id=337


  6. Re: SSI finally writes a good news release

    In <1137185991.063336.115270@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups. com>, on 01/13/2006
    at 12:59 PM, eugenegorbunoff@mail.ru said:



    >Users report about success with:
    >* Linksys NSLU2 (Networked storage device) --
    >http://en.ecomstation.ru/hardware.ph...on=item&id=390
    >* SimpleTech Simpleshare STI-NAS/160 (Network Attached Storage) --
    >http://en.ecomstation.ru/hardware.ph...on=item&id=337



    Thanks for the post.

    What I meant when I said there weren't any that worked with OS2, was this;
    There aren't any NAS devices that I can find which will let me format a
    drive for the HPFS. Or they are set up for USB drives, which mean more
    hardware to buy. That is not a solution to me.



  7. Re: SSI finally writes a good news release

    letoured@nospam.net wrote:

    > What I meant when I said there weren't any that worked with OS2, was this;
    > There aren't any NAS devices that I can find which will let me format a
    > drive for the HPFS.


    If it's a network drive, and it supports long file names and extended
    attributes, does it matter what the underlying file system is?

  8. Re: SSI finally writes a good news release

    On Sat, 14 Jan 2006 21:54:33 UTC, Steve Wendt
    wrote:

    > letoured@nospam.net wrote:
    >
    > > What I meant when I said there weren't any that worked with OS2, was this;
    > > There aren't any NAS devices that I can find which will let me format a
    > > drive for the HPFS.

    >
    > If it's a network drive, and it supports long file names and extended
    > attributes, does it matter what the underlying file system is?


    It depends on whether Samba, in this case, will support OS/2's
    extended attributes on the share. A google search seems to indicate
    it may not.

    Many people have got confused through the years about network file
    support. People think that the OS on the client needs to have a
    driver for the remote hard drive share to even read it.


  9. Re: SSI finally writes a good news release

    Kevin K wrote:

    > It depends on whether Samba, in this case, will support OS/2's
    > extended attributes on the share. A google search seems to indicate
    > it may not.


    The current Samba 3.x code is definitely buggy. Here's an example:
    https://bugzilla.samba.org/show_bug.cgi?id=2661

  10. Re: SSI finally writes a good news release

    Hi Steve

    Steve Wendt wrote:
    > Kevin K wrote:
    >
    >> It depends on whether Samba, in this case, will support OS/2's
    >> extended attributes on the share. A google search seems to indicate
    >> it may not.

    >
    >
    > The current Samba 3.x code is definitely buggy. Here's an example:
    > https://bugzilla.samba.org/show_bug.cgi?id=2661



    Having chased down a problem with the previously mentioned NSLU2
    following a firmware update to the device which included samba 3.0.11
    which displays the above problem I can inform you that the samba guys
    fixed the bug in 3.0.16 - so I am told.

    Still waiting for Linksys to get their act together and produce a decent
    firmware update for the NSLU2 with a useable samba though so cannot
    confirm that myself. Other posts in newsgroups suggest that
    current/recent samba releases do work.

    As Linksys have been "working on this" for around 4 months without any
    sign of progress I doubt that I would now recommend a Linksys product to
    anyone.


    Ed

    Why not build yourself a mini pc as a server box? Probably the only way
    to get to use hpfs on a NAS disk :-)

    Regards

    Pete

  11. Re: SSI finally writes a good news release

    Peter Brown wrote:

    >> The current Samba 3.x code is definitely buggy. Here's an example:
    >> https://bugzilla.samba.org/show_bug.cgi?id=2661

    >
    > which displays the above problem I can inform you that the samba guys
    > fixed the bug in 3.0.16 - so I am told.


    I doubt it - when they list OS/2 related stuff as fixed, they usually
    haven't actually tested it. If I remember correctly, the problem was
    unchanged in versions later than 3.0.16 (I forget which was the last one
    I tried).

  12. Re: SSI finally writes a good news release

    In , on 01/15/2006
    at 10:15 PM, Peter Brown said:



    >Hi Steve


    >Steve Wendt wrote:
    >> Kevin K wrote:
    >>
    >>> It depends on whether Samba, in this case, will support OS/2's
    >>> extended attributes on the share. A google search seems to indicate
    >>> it may not.

    >>
    >>
    >> The current Samba 3.x code is definitely buggy. Here's an example:
    >> https://bugzilla.samba.org/show_bug.cgi?id=2661



    >Having chased down a problem with the previously mentioned NSLU2
    >following a firmware update to the device which included samba 3.0.11
    >which displays the above problem I can inform you that the samba guys
    >fixed the bug in 3.0.16 - so I am told.


    >Still waiting for Linksys to get their act together and produce a decent
    >firmware update for the NSLU2 with a useable samba though so cannot
    >confirm that myself. Other posts in newsgroups suggest that
    >current/recent samba releases do work.


    >As Linksys have been "working on this" for around 4 months without any
    >sign of progress I doubt that I would now recommend a Linksys product to
    >anyone.



    >Ed


    >Why not build yourself a mini pc as a server box? Probably the only way
    >to get to use hpfs on a NAS disk :-)



    I think you're probably right. How do you define a mini-pc, and how would
    you set one up?


    I've also wondered one OS2 solution might be to use IDE drives that are
    put in a USB enclosure, and formatted for HPFS, and then plugged into a
    NAS USB adapter -- since there are several on the market.




    >Regards


    >Pete



  13. Re: SSI finally writes a good news release

    Hi Ed

    letoured@nospam.net wrote:
    > In , on 01/15/2006
    > at 10:15 PM, Peter Brown said:
    >


    >
    >>Ed

    >
    >
    >>Why not build yourself a mini pc as a server box? Probably the only way
    >>to get to use hpfs on a NAS disk :-)

    >
    >
    >
    > I think you're probably right. How do you define a mini-pc, and how would
    > you set one up?



    I guess the easiest answer is a baby sized "everything onboard"
    mainboard with case to match and whatever size disk - maybe 2, depending
    on whether you have a cd/dvd as well - that you want.

    Borrow necessities like keyboard, mouse and screen from another pc while
    installing and setting up then use NetOp or similar for remote access to
    control the system when needed.


    >
    >
    > I've also wondered one OS2 solution might be to use IDE drives that are
    > put in a USB enclosure, and formatted for HPFS, and then plugged into a
    > NAS USB adapter -- since there are several on the market.
    >


    If by NAS USB adapter you mean something like a Linksys NSLU2 then there
    is a good chance the adapter will not work with HPFS - the NSLU2
    certainly does not.

    Regards

    Pete

  14. Re: SSI finally writes a good news release

    On Mon, 16 Jan 2006 18:58:26 UTC, Peter Brown
    wrote:

    > Hi Ed
    >
    > letoured@nospam.net wrote:
    > > In , on 01/15/2006
    > > at 10:15 PM, Peter Brown said:
    > >

    >
    > >
    > >>Ed

    > >
    > >
    > >>Why not build yourself a mini pc as a server box? Probably the only way
    > >>to get to use hpfs on a NAS disk :-)

    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > I think you're probably right. How do you define a mini-pc, and how would
    > > you set one up?

    >
    >
    > I guess the easiest answer is a baby sized "everything onboard"
    > mainboard with case to match and whatever size disk - maybe 2, depending
    > on whether you have a cd/dvd as well - that you want.
    >
    > Borrow necessities like keyboard, mouse and screen from another pc while
    > installing and setting up then use NetOp or similar for remote access to
    > control the system when needed.
    >
    >
    > >
    > >
    > > I've also wondered one OS2 solution might be to use IDE drives that are
    > > put in a USB enclosure, and formatted for HPFS, and then plugged into a
    > > NAS USB adapter -- since there are several on the market.
    > >

    >
    > If by NAS USB adapter you mean something like a Linksys NSLU2 then there
    > is a good chance the adapter will not work with HPFS - the NSLU2
    > certainly does not.
    >
    > Regards
    >
    > Pete



    --
    I would think that, at this point in time, you would want to use a
    better filesystem than HPFS.

    My recollection is that HPFS is limited to 2gig files, and 64gig
    partitions. Both significant limitations in a world of 300+gig hard
    drives.

    If you want a small server that supports EA, then a very small
    footprint PC with OS/2 support would probably be a better choice, with
    JFS as the shared drive.

  15. Re: SSI finally writes a good news release

    In , on 01/16/2006
    at 06:58 PM, Peter Brown said:



    >Hi Ed


    >letoured@nospam.net wrote:
    >> In , on 01/15/2006
    >> at 10:15 PM, Peter Brown said:
    >>


    >>
    >>>Ed

    >>
    >>
    >>>Why not build yourself a mini pc as a server box? Probably the only way
    >>>to get to use hpfs on a NAS disk :-)

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> I think you're probably right. How do you define a mini-pc, and how would
    >> you set one up?



    >I guess the easiest answer is a baby sized "everything onboard"
    >mainboard with case to match and whatever size disk - maybe 2, depending
    >on whether you have a cd/dvd as well - that you want.


    >Borrow necessities like keyboard, mouse and screen from another pc while
    >installing and setting up then use NetOp or similar for remote access to
    >control the system when needed.



    >>
    >>
    >> I've also wondered one OS2 solution might be to use IDE drives that are
    >> put in a USB enclosure, and formatted for HPFS, and then plugged into a
    >> NAS USB adapter -- since there are several on the market.
    >>


    >If by NAS USB adapter you mean something like a Linksys NSLU2 then there
    >is a good chance the adapter will not work with HPFS - the NSLU2
    >certainly does not.


    Thanks for confirming that. It backs up not having any NAS devices that
    actually work well with OS2.

    >Regards


    >Pete



  16. Re: SSI finally writes a good news release

    In , on 01/16/2006
    at 11:08 PM, "Kevin K" said:



    >On Mon, 16 Jan 2006 18:58:26 UTC, Peter Brown
    > wrote:


    >> Hi Ed
    >>
    >> letoured@nospam.net wrote:
    >> > In , on 01/15/2006
    >> > at 10:15 PM, Peter Brown said:
    >> >

    >>
    >> >
    >> >>Ed
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >>Why not build yourself a mini pc as a server box? Probably the only way
    >> >>to get to use hpfs on a NAS disk :-)
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > I think you're probably right. How do you define a mini-pc, and how would
    >> > you set one up?

    >>
    >>
    >> I guess the easiest answer is a baby sized "everything onboard"
    >> mainboard with case to match and whatever size disk - maybe 2, depending
    >> on whether you have a cd/dvd as well - that you want.
    >>
    >> Borrow necessities like keyboard, mouse and screen from another pc while
    >> installing and setting up then use NetOp or similar for remote access to
    >> control the system when needed.
    >>
    >>
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > I've also wondered one OS2 solution might be to use IDE drives that are
    >> > put in a USB enclosure, and formatted for HPFS, and then plugged into a
    >> > NAS USB adapter -- since there are several on the market.
    >> >

    >>
    >> If by NAS USB adapter you mean something like a Linksys NSLU2 then there
    >> is a good chance the adapter will not work with HPFS - the NSLU2
    >> certainly does not.
    >>
    >> Regards
    >>
    >> Pete


    >I would think that, at this point in time, you would want to use a
    >better filesystem than HPFS.


    Actually no there isn't a better system. HPFS has no limit on the number
    of files and they will never make a hard drive bigger then the limits of
    the system -- and most importantly, if there is a drive failure and if its
    been formatted with the /L switch, there is a 99.9% chance that I can
    recover just about everything on the drive.


    >My recollection is that HPFS is limited to 2gig files, and 64gig
    >partitions. Both significant limitations in a world of 300+gig hard
    >drives.


    I think 2 gig is correct. I think the partition size is wrong, and I
    don't care anyway. I'm not going to use a windoze system.

    >If you want a small server that supports EA, then a very small
    >footprint PC with OS/2 support would probably be a better choice, with
    >JFS as the shared drive.


    There are recovery problems with JFS. Far fewer with HPFS.





  17. Re: SSI finally writes a good news release

    letoured@nospam.net wrote:
    > In , on 01/16/2006
    > at 11:08 PM, "Kevin K" said:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >>On Mon, 16 Jan 2006 18:58:26 UTC, Peter Brown
    >> wrote:

    >
    >
    >>>Hi Ed
    >>>
    >>>letoured@nospam.net wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>In , on 01/15/2006
    >>>> at 10:15 PM, Peter Brown said:
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>>>Ed
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>Why not build yourself a mini pc as a server box? Probably the only way
    >>>>>to get to use hpfs on a NAS disk :-)
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>I think you're probably right. How do you define a mini-pc, and how would
    >>>>you set one up?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>I guess the easiest answer is a baby sized "everything onboard"
    >>>mainboard with case to match and whatever size disk - maybe 2, depending
    >>>on whether you have a cd/dvd as well - that you want.
    >>>
    >>>Borrow necessities like keyboard, mouse and screen from another pc while
    >>>installing and setting up then use NetOp or similar for remote access to
    >>>control the system when needed.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>>I've also wondered one OS2 solution might be to use IDE drives that are
    >>>>put in a USB enclosure, and formatted for HPFS, and then plugged into a
    >>>>NAS USB adapter -- since there are several on the market.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>If by NAS USB adapter you mean something like a Linksys NSLU2 then there
    >>>is a good chance the adapter will not work with HPFS - the NSLU2
    >>>certainly does not.
    >>>
    >>>Regards
    >>>
    >>>Pete

    >
    >
    >>I would think that, at this point in time, you would want to use a
    >>better filesystem than HPFS.

    >
    >
    > Actually no there isn't a better system. HPFS has no limit on the number
    > of files and they will never make a hard drive bigger then the limits of
    > the system -- and most importantly, if there is a drive failure and if its
    > been formatted with the /L switch, there is a 99.9% chance that I can
    > recover just about everything on the drive.
    >
    >
    >
    >>My recollection is that HPFS is limited to 2gig files, and 64gig
    >>partitions. Both significant limitations in a world of 300+gig hard
    >>drives.

    >
    >
    > I think 2 gig is correct. I think the partition size is wrong, and I
    > don't care anyway. I'm not going to use a windoze system.
    >
    >
    >>If you want a small server that supports EA, then a very small
    >>footprint PC with OS/2 support would probably be a better choice, with
    >>JFS as the shared drive.

    >
    >
    > There are recovery problems with JFS. Far fewer with HPFS.
    >


    I've kept my data on HPFS drives for the last 12 years and, unlike most
    Windows users, I still have it, in spite of disk failures, power
    failures, migration to new hardware, etc. I was telling someone
    recently that I keep digital copies of every email that I send and I
    still have them going back 10 or more years. They were absolutely
    amazed. Windows users seem to suffer a catastrophic data loss every
    couple of years, for one reason or another.

    --
    Posted with OS/2 Warp 4.52
    and IBM Web Browser v2.0.5

  18. Re: SSI finally writes a good news release

    On Tue, 17 Jan 2006 13:03:17 UTC, letoured@nospam.net wrote:

    > In , on 01/16/2006
    > at 11:08 PM, "Kevin K" said:
    >
    >
    >
    > >On Mon, 16 Jan 2006 18:58:26 UTC, Peter Brown
    > > wrote:

    >
    > >> Hi Ed
    > >>
    > >> letoured@nospam.net wrote:
    > >> > In , on 01/15/2006
    > >> > at 10:15 PM, Peter Brown said:
    > >> >
    > >>
    > >> >
    > >> >>Ed
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >> >>Why not build yourself a mini pc as a server box? Probably the only way
    > >> >>to get to use hpfs on a NAS disk :-)
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >> > I think you're probably right. How do you define a mini-pc, and how would
    > >> > you set one up?
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> I guess the easiest answer is a baby sized "everything onboard"
    > >> mainboard with case to match and whatever size disk - maybe 2, depending
    > >> on whether you have a cd/dvd as well - that you want.
    > >>
    > >> Borrow necessities like keyboard, mouse and screen from another pc while
    > >> installing and setting up then use NetOp or similar for remote access to
    > >> control the system when needed.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >> > I've also wondered one OS2 solution might be to use IDE drives that are
    > >> > put in a USB enclosure, and formatted for HPFS, and then plugged into a
    > >> > NAS USB adapter -- since there are several on the market.
    > >> >
    > >>
    > >> If by NAS USB adapter you mean something like a Linksys NSLU2 then there
    > >> is a good chance the adapter will not work with HPFS - the NSLU2
    > >> certainly does not.
    > >>
    > >> Regards
    > >>
    > >> Pete

    >
    > >I would think that, at this point in time, you would want to use a
    > >better filesystem than HPFS.

    >
    > Actually no there isn't a better system. HPFS has no limit on the number
    > of files and they will never make a hard drive bigger then the limits of
    > the system -- and most importantly, if there is a drive failure and if its
    > been formatted with the /L switch, there is a 99.9% chance that I can
    > recover just about everything on the drive.
    >
    >
    > >My recollection is that HPFS is limited to 2gig files, and 64gig
    > >partitions. Both significant limitations in a world of 300+gig hard
    > >drives.

    >
    > I think 2 gig is correct. I think the partition size is wrong, and I
    > don't care anyway. I'm not going to use a windoze system.
    >
    > >If you want a small server that supports EA, then a very small
    > >footprint PC with OS/2 support would probably be a better choice, with
    > >JFS as the shared drive.

    >
    > There are recovery problems with JFS. Far fewer with HPFS.
    >
    >
    >
    >



    --

    2gig limits are a killer for me in today's world. Media files, backup
    archives, etc.

    And even on OS/2, the implementation of HPFS, due to it's 16bitness,
    adversely affects it's performance. Decisions that worked to make it
    faster in an era of 2-4 meg computers don't really help in a world of
    1gig of RAM.

    Just did a google search, and couldn't find any site that mentioned
    anything other than a 64 gig partition limit, though one, old, site
    mentioned a 16gig limit on the CHKDSK of the time.

  19. Re: SSI finally writes a good news release

    In <11sqddnc2l7sg01@corp.supernews.com>, on 01/17/2006
    at 10:23 AM, "David T. Johnson" said:



    >letoured@nospam.net wrote:
    >> In , on 01/16/2006
    >> at 11:08 PM, "Kevin K" said:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>>On Mon, 16 Jan 2006 18:58:26 UTC, Peter Brown
    >>> wrote:

    >>
    >>
    >>>>Hi Ed
    >>>>
    >>>>letoured@nospam.net wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>In , on 01/15/2006
    >>>>> at 10:15 PM, Peter Brown said:
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>>Ed
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>Why not build yourself a mini pc as a server box? Probably the only way
    >>>>>>to get to use hpfs on a NAS disk :-)
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>I think you're probably right. How do you define a mini-pc, and how would
    >>>>>you set one up?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>I guess the easiest answer is a baby sized "everything onboard"
    >>>>mainboard with case to match and whatever size disk - maybe 2, depending
    >>>>on whether you have a cd/dvd as well - that you want.
    >>>>
    >>>>Borrow necessities like keyboard, mouse and screen from another pc while
    >>>>installing and setting up then use NetOp or similar for remote access to
    >>>>control the system when needed.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>I've also wondered one OS2 solution might be to use IDE drives that are
    >>>>>put in a USB enclosure, and formatted for HPFS, and then plugged into a
    >>>>>NAS USB adapter -- since there are several on the market.
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>If by NAS USB adapter you mean something like a Linksys NSLU2 then there
    >>>>is a good chance the adapter will not work with HPFS - the NSLU2
    >>>>certainly does not.
    >>>>
    >>>>Regards
    >>>>
    >>>>Pete

    >>
    >>
    >>>I would think that, at this point in time, you would want to use a
    >>>better filesystem than HPFS.

    >>
    >>
    >> Actually no there isn't a better system. HPFS has no limit on the number
    >> of files and they will never make a hard drive bigger then the limits of
    >> the system -- and most importantly, if there is a drive failure and if its
    >> been formatted with the /L switch, there is a 99.9% chance that I can
    >> recover just about everything on the drive.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>>My recollection is that HPFS is limited to 2gig files, and 64gig
    >>>partitions. Both significant limitations in a world of 300+gig hard
    >>>drives.

    >>
    >>
    >> I think 2 gig is correct. I think the partition size is wrong, and I
    >> don't care anyway. I'm not going to use a windoze system.
    >>
    >>
    >>>If you want a small server that supports EA, then a very small
    >>>footprint PC with OS/2 support would probably be a better choice, with
    >>>JFS as the shared drive.

    >>
    >>
    >> There are recovery problems with JFS. Far fewer with HPFS.
    >>


    >I've kept my data on HPFS drives for the last 12 years and, unlike most
    >Windows users, I still have it, in spite of disk failures, power
    >failures, migration to new hardware, etc. I was telling someone
    >recently that I keep digital copies of every email that I send and I
    >still have them going back 10 or more years. They were absolutely
    >amazed. Windows users seem to suffer a catastrophic data loss every
    >couple of years, for one reason or another.


    Exactly. I have data and manuals going back 20 years, and I have never
    lost anything with drive failures. I have had to spend a couple of days,
    two or three times to recover data from failed drives, but its still
    there.




  20. Re: SSI finally writes a good news release

    In article ,
    "Kevin K" wrote:
    >Just did a google search, and couldn't find any site that mentioned
    >anything other than a 64 gig partition limit, though one, old, site
    >mentioned a 16gig limit on the CHKDSK of the time.


    The HPFS architecture allows a partition of up to 2 TB, but the current code
    allows only up to 64 GB. This is because the upper 5 bits of the LSN field
    (Logical Sector Number) are used for storing the volume ID. This is a
    low-overhead way of allowing the HPFS cache to handle multiple volumes.
    Doug Azzarito is on record as saying that the code change to allow 2 TB
    would only take a couple of weeks, but someone would have to want it badly
    enough to pay for the coding and testing. Other work would have to be done
    too, such as recoding CHKDSK which also has a 64 GB limit. Given the time
    that it would take to CHKDSK a 2 TB volume, it's not surprising that no-one
    wanted it badly enough to pay for it to be done.

    --
    Don Hills (dmhills at attglobaldotnet) Wellington, New Zealand
    "New interface closely resembles Presentation Manager,
    preparing you for the wonders of OS/2!"
    -- Advertisement on the box for Microsoft Windows 2.11 for 286

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