PNfax, who owns it now? - OS2

This is a discussion on PNfax, who owns it now? - OS2 ; Does anyone know who, if anyone, is the current owner/market of PMfax? The published URL is http://www.cds-inc.com , but there is a For Sale sign there, so they appear to have gone belly up. There is said to be a ...

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Thread: PNfax, who owns it now?

  1. PNfax, who owns it now?

    Does anyone know who, if anyone, is the current owner/market of PMfax? The
    published URL is http://www.cds-inc.com, but there is a For Sale sign
    there, so they appear to have gone belly up.

    There is said to be a Linux version of PMfax, but without a
    momma/poppa, "said to be" is as far as it goes.
    --
    Stan Goodman
    Qiryat Tiv'on
    Israel

  2. Re: PNfax, who owns it now?

    On 02/18/08 06:27 am Stan Goodman wrote:

    > Does anyone know who, if anyone, is the current owner/market of PMfax? The
    > published URL is http://www.cds-inc.com, but there is a For Sale sign
    > there, so they appear to have gone belly up.
    >
    > There is said to be a Linux version of PMfax, but without a
    > momma/poppa, "said to be" is as far as it goes.



    CDS was acquired by -- or merged with -- Intradyn and dropped all
    support for -- and tried to forget that it had ever had anything to do
    with -- products for OS/2. They did for a while continue their Back
    Again II line (the Windozzze equivalent of their original Back
    Again/2[000] software), but that no longer seems to be mentioned on the
    Intradyn site either.

    So I think that PMFax now falls into the "abandonware" category, and
    probably it won't be too difficult to find what you need on the 'Net
    somewhere.

    Perce

  3. Re: PNfax, who owns it now?

    Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

    > On 02/18/08 06:27 am Stan Goodman wrote:
    >
    >> Does anyone know who, if anyone, is the current owner/market of PMfax?
    >> The published URL is http://www.cds-inc.com, but there is a For Sale sign
    >> there, so they appear to have gone belly up.
    >>
    >> There is said to be a Linux version of PMfax, but without a
    >> momma/poppa, "said to be" is as far as it goes.

    >
    >
    > CDS was acquired by -- or merged with -- Intradyn and dropped all
    > support for -- and tried to forget that it had ever had anything to do
    > with -- products for OS/2. They did for a while continue their Back
    > Again II line (the Windozzze equivalent of their original Back
    > Again/2[000] software), but that no longer seems to be mentioned on the
    > Intradyn site either.


    The name of the present owner is what I wanted to know, thanks for telling
    me this. I don't want to ask about the OS/2 program, which is what I have
    been using from its initial release and until today. I do need to ask them
    about the Linux version that I saw mentioned on the Web today. I'm hoping
    that they can still make it available.

    > So I think that PMFax now falls into the "abandonware" category, and
    > probably it won't be too difficult to find what you need on the 'Net
    > somewhere.
    >
    > Perce


    --
    Stan Goodman
    Qiryat Tiv'on
    Israel

  4. Re: PNfax, who owns it now?

    On Mon, 18 Feb 2008 15:41:02 UTC, Stan Goodman
    wrote:

    > The name of the present owner is what I wanted to know, thanks for telling
    > me this. I don't want to ask about the OS/2 program, which is what I have
    > been using from its initial release and until today. I do need to ask them
    > about the Linux version that I saw mentioned on the Web today. I'm hoping
    > that they can still make it available.


    I thought I had the linux version somewhere but I can't find it now. I
    did try it some time back as I was thinking of moving my main server
    off ECS but I did not in the end. The program did work ISTR. They
    published keys to unlock the various versions.

    --
    Regards
    Dave Saville

    NB Remove nospam. for good email address

  5. Re: PNfax, who owns it now?

    Dave Saville wrote:

    > On Mon, 18 Feb 2008 15:41:02 UTC, Stan Goodman
    > wrote:
    >
    >> The name of the present owner is what I wanted to know, thanks for
    >> telling me this. I don't want to ask about the OS/2 program, which is
    >> what I have been using from its initial release and until today. I do
    >> need to ask them about the Linux version that I saw mentioned on the Web
    >> today. I'm hoping that they can still make it available.

    >
    > I thought I had the linux version somewhere but I can't find it now. I
    > did try it some time back as I was thinking of moving my main server
    > off ECS but I did not in the end. The program did work ISTR. They
    > published keys to unlock the various versions.


    If it turns up, I would be very grateful if you would let me no.

    --
    Stan Goodman
    Qiryat Tiv'on
    Israel

  6. Re: PNfax, who owns it now?

    On Mon, 18 Feb 2008 23:51:26 UTC, Stan Goodman
    wrote:

    > If it turns up, I would be very grateful if you would let me no.


    E-mail me. Almost usable address below.

    --
    From the eComStation 2.0 RC2 of Doug Bissett
    dougb007 at telus dot net
    (Please make the obvious changes, to e-mail me)


  7. Re: PNfax, who owns it now?

    On Mon, 18 Feb 2008 11:27:50 UTC, Stan Goodman wrote:

    > There is said to be a Linux version of PMfax, but without a
    > momma/poppa, "said to be" is as far as it goes.


    So you've gone all Linux now? Then I don't need to worry about Hebrew
    support for Firefox 3 any more...
    --
    Greetings, | My From: address is valid as is the version without "spam"
    Peter. | I try to find real messages among the spam once a week

  8. Re: PNfax, who owns it now?

    Peter Weilbacher wrote:

    > On Mon, 18 Feb 2008 11:27:50 UTC, Stan Goodman wrote:
    >
    >> There is said to be a Linux version of PMfax, but without a
    >> momma/poppa, "said to be" is as far as it goes.

    >
    > So you've gone all Linux now? Then I don't need to worry about Hebrew
    > support for Firefox 3 any more...


    Et mi, Brute.

    But I haven't removed OS/2 from this machine, and I use it. Or from my
    notebook machine, which is what what I continue to use when I travel --
    including PmW-Fx.

    Are you sure that nobody else cares?

    --
    Stan Goodman
    Qiryat Tiv'on
    Israel

  9. Re: PNfax, who owns it now?

    On Sun, 24 Feb 2008 23:06:26 UTC, Stan Goodman wrote:

    > Peter Weilbacher wrote:
    >
    > > So you've gone all Linux now? Then I don't need to worry about Hebrew
    > > support for Firefox 3 any more...

    >
    > Et mi, Brute.
    >
    > But I haven't removed OS/2 from this machine, and I use it. Or from my
    > notebook machine, which is what what I continue to use when I travel --
    > including PmW-Fx.


    Nice to hear that.

    If you ever feel inclined to install Firefox 3 (currently beta 3) and
    find problems with Hebrew, please tell me.

    > Are you sure that nobody else cares?


    Have never heard anybody else report problems with Hebrew.
    --
    Greetings, | My From: address is valid as is the version without "spam"
    Peter. | I try to find real messages among the spam once a week

  10. Re: PNfax, who owns it now?

    Peter Weilbacher wrote:

    > On Sun, 24 Feb 2008 23:06:26 UTC, Stan Goodman wrote:
    >
    >> Peter Weilbacher wrote:
    >>
    >> > So you've gone all Linux now? Then I don't need to worry about Hebrew
    >> > support for Firefox 3 any more...

    >>
    >> Et mi, Brute.
    >>
    >> But I haven't removed OS/2 from this machine, and I use it. Or from my
    >> notebook machine, which is what what I continue to use when I travel --
    >> including PmW-Fx.

    >
    > Nice to hear that.
    >
    > If you ever feel inclined to install Firefox 3 (currently beta 3) and
    > find problems with Hebrew, please tell me.


    I will do that.

    >> Are you sure that nobody else cares?

    >
    > Have never heard anybody else report problems with Hebrew.


    You mean OS/2 users are linguistically challenged? =;-(8

    Actually, I have had no recent browser problems with Hebrew either. I think
    the browsers have there act together on Hebrew; or web designers have
    stopped inventing their own "standards". Sometimes I look at an Arabic
    page, and the same is true for that language.

    But if you are looking for browser-related troubles, I have one in viewing
    film clips on the jpost.com website, whereas I can see those on cnn.com
    without difficulty. If you want me to describe the behavior, I can do so
    off-group.
    --
    Stan Goodman
    Qiryat Tiv'on
    Israel

  11. Hebrew and browsers (was: PNfax, who owns it now?)

    On 26.02.08 17:25, Stan Goodman wrote:
    > Peter Weilbacher wrote:
    >> Have never heard anybody else report problems with Hebrew.

    >
    > You mean OS/2 users are linguistically challenged? =;-(8
    >
    > Actually, I have had no recent browser problems with Hebrew either. I think
    > the browsers have there act together on Hebrew; or web designers have
    > stopped inventing their own "standards". Sometimes I look at an Arabic
    > page, and the same is true for that language.


    Well, maybe there are other people from Israel who use OS/2? ;-)
    The point I was trying to make is that the whole code that previously made
    Arabic and Hebrew work had to be rewritten for Firefox 3, and I know that
    at least Arabic is broken. It uses the right characters and should get the
    direction right if the webpages are correct but it always displays the
    shapes it should only use for single characters. Not sure if Hebrew is
    similar in this regard.

    > But if you are looking for browser-related troubles, I have one in viewing
    > film clips on the jpost.com website, whereas I can see those on cnn.com
    > without difficulty. If you want me to describe the behavior, I can do so
    > off-group.


    I'm really not the person to help with that. There are several people more
    knowledgeable about movies-in-webpages than me. But if you would post the
    description to mozilla.dev.ports.os2 there are currently several people
    discussing movie plugins anyway.

    Best wishes,
    Peter.

  12. Re: Hebrew and browsers (was: PNfax, who owns it now?)

    Peter Weilbacher wrote:

    > On 26.02.08 17:25, Stan Goodman wrote:
    >> Peter Weilbacher wrote:
    >>> Have never heard anybody else report problems with Hebrew.

    >>
    >> You mean OS/2 users are linguistically challenged? =;-(8
    >>
    >> Actually, I have had no recent browser problems with Hebrew either. I
    >> think the browsers have there act together on Hebrew; or web designers
    >> have stopped inventing their own "standards". Sometimes I look at an
    >> Arabic page, and the same is true for that language.

    >
    > Well, maybe there are other people from Israel who use OS/2? ;-)


    Not to my knowledge. I haven't encountered one for a very long time. There
    are many emigres living temporarily or otherwise in other parts of the
    world. I don't think they are using OS/2 either. OS/2 laid a colossal egg
    here, very early on; greater and earlier than in the Left-to-Right world.

    > The point I was trying to make is that the whole code that previously made
    > Arabic and Hebrew work had to be rewritten for Firefox 3, and I know that
    > at least Arabic is broken. It uses the right characters and should get the
    > direction right if the webpages are correct but it always displays the
    > shapes it should only use for single characters. Not sure if Hebrew is
    > similar in this regard.


    Ah! Now I get your drift. Arabic, for the benefit of anyone that doesn't
    know, has initial, medial, final, and isolated shapes for most letters of
    its alphabet (alif-ba); that is a consequent of the fact that it is written
    in basically a cursive manner -- most characters of a word can be connected
    to the letters fore and aft of it, so have to have different shapes
    depending on the neighbors.

    Hebrew has only one shape each for most letters, but there are five letters
    of the alef-bet that have a final form.

    But even so, the problem of Arabic doesn't exist in Hebrew for the following
    reason. Arabic word processors have to examine the context of each letter,
    and determine which shape to use accordingly. In other words, each letter
    of the Arabic alif-ba has only one key on the keyboard and a single
    character code; but the code of each letter may correspond to as many as
    four shapes, according to context, which the program has to analyze.

    Most multilingual text processors that support Hebrew don't do that, which
    is why the standard keyboard on which I am writing this has separate keys
    for each shape, so that the number of letter keys (and the number of
    character codes) is the number of letters of the alef-bet plus the number
    of final shapes. I don't see that the problem of Arabic would arise with
    Hebrew, in either a text processor (mail/news client) or a browser.

    Hebrew text processing has other problems that aren't always understood by
    programmers. The Hebrew "support" in OS/2, for example is unusable. I had
    not been able to write anything in Hebrew on my computer until OpenOffice
    became available. That may have a lot to do with the fact that OS/2 never
    really got off the ground here.

    I hope that answers your question. If it doesn't, I'd be happy to explain
    whatever I haven't made clear. If you don't have my address handy, please
    ask for it here.

    > Best wishes,
    > Peter.


    Alles Beste...

    --
    Stan Goodman
    Qiryat Tiv'on
    Israel

  13. Re: Hebrew and browsers (was: PNfax, who owns it now?)

    On Sat, 1 Mar 2008 19:13:09 UTC, Stan Goodman wrote:

    > > Well, maybe there are other people from Israel who use OS/2? ;-)

    >
    > Not to my knowledge. I haven't encountered one for a very long time. There
    > are many emigres living temporarily or otherwise in other parts of the
    > world. I don't think they are using OS/2 either. OS/2 laid a colossal egg
    > here, very early on; greater and earlier than in the Left-to-Right world.


    On that note, can I run a timezone issue past you?

    I've just been rewriting the database for SET TZ= values for the next
    release of eCS. Israel proved to be a big problem, because apparently the
    switchover between summer and winter time is based on the lunar calendar.
    There's just no way to represent that logic in a SET TZ variable. (The
    previous version of eCS apparently just set it to March 20/October 20,
    which I think is totally wrong.)

    I eventually decided to simply delete the switchover logic for Israel
    entirely. Any users in Israel will have to be responsible for updating the
    system clock on their own. (You pretty much were before as well, anyways.)

    Is that reasonable?

    --
    Alex Taylor
    Fukushima, Japan
    http://www.cs-club.org/~alex

    Please take off hat when replying.

  14. Re: Hebrew and browsers (was: PNfax, who owns it now?)

    Alex Taylor wrote:

    > On Sat, 1 Mar 2008 19:13:09 UTC, Stan Goodman
    > wrote:
    >
    >> > Well, maybe there are other people from Israel who use OS/2? ;-)

    >>
    >> Not to my knowledge. I haven't encountered one for a very long time.
    >> There are many emigres living temporarily or otherwise in other parts of
    >> the world. I don't think they are using OS/2 either. OS/2 laid a colossal
    >> egg here, very early on; greater and earlier than in the Left-to-Right
    >> world.

    >
    > On that note, can I run a timezone issue past you?
    >
    > I've just been rewriting the database for SET TZ= values for the next
    > release of eCS. Israel proved to be a big problem, because apparently the
    > switchover between summer and winter time is based on the lunar calendar.
    > There's just no way to represent that logic in a SET TZ variable. (The
    > previous version of eCS apparently just set it to March 20/October 20,
    > which I think is totally wrong.)
    >
    > I eventually decided to simply delete the switchover logic for Israel
    > entirely. Any users in Israel will have to be responsible for updating
    > the
    > system clock on their own. (You pretty much were before as well,
    > anyways.)
    >
    > Is that reasonable?


    For whom? =;-/8 If you are doing this for the benefit of OS/2 users in
    Israel, you are wasting your fragrance on desert air.

    This was more difficult until a few years ago, when the times for the
    transitions were announced yearly, usually a few days before they were to
    take place, so nobody knew what time it would be next week, twice a year.
    This played havoc with, for example, airline timetables. I think that's
    still true of Jordan, but that may have changed.

    Some years ago I wrote a REXX script to manage the clock so I don't have to
    do it manually, which is a drag. The clock is easy to set for the
    winter>summer transition, because it happens according to the Gregorian
    calendar in the same defined way as everywhere else. The summer>winter
    transition is tricky, because it happens on the last Fri-Sat night before
    Yom Kippur. I do have an algorithm to calculate the date of Rosh haShanah
    (and therefore (Yom Kippur) for a given year, but I cheated and instead
    made a table of dates of the holiday for a number of years; I will be dead
    before the table is invalid. But there is nothing exotic about the
    algorithm; it's just a list of arithmetic calculations of lunar phases,
    with some perturbations allowing for the necessity of preventing certain
    holidays from falling on the Sabbath. I can give you references of articles
    that develop these calculations if you like, but they are not hard to find
    by googling.

    --
    Stan Goodman
    Qiryat Tiv'on
    Israel

  15. Re: Hebrew and browsers

    On 01.03.08 20:13, Stan Goodman wrote:

    > I hope that answers your question. If it doesn't, I'd be happy to explain
    > whatever I haven't made clear.


    Yes, thank you for the clarification!
    Peter.

  16. Re: Hebrew and browsers (was: PNfax, who owns it now?)

    On Sun, 2 Mar 2008 15:39:11 UTC, Stan Goodman wrote:

    > > I eventually decided to simply delete the switchover logic for Israel
    > > entirely. Any users in Israel will have to be responsible for updating
    > > the system clock on their own.
    > >
    > > Is that reasonable?

    >
    > For whom? =;-/8 If you are doing this for the benefit of OS/2 users in
    > Israel, you are wasting your fragrance on desert air.


    I want to be complete. If we've got an entry for almost every country in
    the world, they might as well be _correct_ entries. And who knows? Some
    other OS/2 users may at least _visit_ Israel occasionally...


    > The summer>winter transition is tricky, because it happens on the last
    > Fri-Sat night before Yom Kippur. I do have an algorithm to calculate the
    > date of Rosh haShanah (and therefore (Yom Kippur) for a given year, but I
    > cheated and instead made a table of dates of the holiday for a number of
    > years; I will be dead before the table is invalid. But there is nothing
    > exotic about the algorithm; it's just a list of arithmetic calculations of
    > lunar phases, with some perturbations allowing for the necessity of
    > preventing certain holidays from falling on the Sabbath. I can give you
    > references of articles that develop these calculations if you like, but
    > they are not hard to find by googling.


    Unfortunately, that would require implementing some whole new conversion
    logic. Right now I can't implement anything that isn't supported by a TZ
    variable, because that's basically what the existing OS/2 utilities use. To
    implement special calculation-based logic would require the implementation
    of a specialized daemon program or something... and, like you said, for how
    many peoples' benefit?

    Thanks, though. I think you've basically confirmed that my approach is
    probably the best one available...
    --
    Alex Taylor
    Fukushima, Japan
    http://www.cs-club.org/~alex

    Please take off hat when replying.

  17. Re: Hebrew and browsers (was: PNfax, who owns it now?)

    Alex Taylor wrote:

    > On Sun, 2 Mar 2008 15:39:11 UTC, Stan Goodman
    > wrote:
    >
    >> > I eventually decided to simply delete the switchover logic for Israel
    >> > entirely. Any users in Israel will have to be responsible for updating
    >> > the system clock on their own.
    >> >
    >> > Is that reasonable?

    >>
    >> For whom? =;-/8 If you are doing this for the benefit of OS/2 users in
    >> Israel, you are wasting your fragrance on desert air.

    >
    > I want to be complete. If we've got an entry for almost every country in
    > the world, they might as well be _correct_ entries. And who knows? Some
    > other OS/2 users may at least _visit_ Israel occasionally...
    >
    >
    >> The summer>winter transition is tricky, because it happens on the last
    >> Fri-Sat night before Yom Kippur. I do have an algorithm to calculate the
    >> date of Rosh haShanah (and therefore (Yom Kippur) for a given year, but I
    >> cheated and instead made a table of dates of the holiday for a number of
    >> years; I will be dead before the table is invalid. But there is nothing
    >> exotic about the algorithm; it's just a list of arithmetic calculations
    >> of lunar phases, with some perturbations allowing for the necessity of
    >> preventing certain holidays from falling on the Sabbath. I can give you
    >> references of articles that develop these calculations if you like, but
    >> they are not hard to find by googling.

    >
    > Unfortunately, that would require implementing some whole new conversion
    > logic. Right now I can't implement anything that isn't supported by a TZ
    > variable, because that's basically what the existing OS/2 utilities use.
    > To implement special calculation-based logic would require the
    > implementation of a specialized daemon program or something... and, like
    > you said, for how
    > many peoples' benefit?


    Actually, I do use the TZ variable...kind of. A script that is started from
    startup.cmd calculates what TZ should be for the current date, and stores
    the result in the environment space. But of course one would have to have
    put the script into startup.cmd, which is no problem at all for a long-term
    resident (who would not need a daemon); there is no point at all to do any
    of this for a hypothetical visiting OS/2 user.

    > Thanks, though. I think you've basically confirmed that my approach is
    > probably the best one available...


    --
    Stan Goodman
    Qiryat Tiv'on
    Israel

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