The Leopard is BACK! - OS2

This is a discussion on The Leopard is BACK! - OS2 ; The display glitch that was preventing Mac Pro users with high-end ATI graphics cards (that would be me!) from running Leopard successfully was resolved yesterday and I slipped the 10.5 upgrade DVD-DL into my SuperDrive and let 'er rip this ...

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Thread: The Leopard is BACK!

  1. The Leopard is BACK!

    The display glitch that was preventing Mac Pro users with high-end ATI
    graphics cards (that would be me!) from running Leopard successfully
    was resolved yesterday and I slipped the 10.5 upgrade DVD-DL into my
    SuperDrive and let 'er rip this morning! Thirty minutes later the
    Leopard was back on my system and running as it should. All 300 new
    features are now mine to own and play with. It is so nice. I can
    only wish OS/2 could be this nice.

    Go ahead, read all about it on my blog, along with a high resolution
    screen shot of my desktop, here: http://www.os2guy.com

    I'm also offering two sets of "CoXtreme Wallpaper Packs" for
    download. These packages include some of the most beautiful desktop
    backgrounds you'll ever have the pleasure of viewing. Yes, they will
    work on OS2 systems so feel free to download and enjoy!

    WaaaHOOO! The Leopard is back!

    Dr. Tim Martin, The OS/2 Guy
    Visit The OS/2 Guy Blog Today
    http://www.os2guy.com


  2. Re: The Leopard is BACK!


  3. Re: The Leopard is BACK!


  4. Re: The Leopard is BACK!

    This has what to do with OS/2?

    Shouldn't you be posting this to apple NGs instead of OS/2 or eCS
    groups? Two years ago you were flaming pretty hard, and even threatened
    legal action, when someone posted eCS info in an OS/2 group. Now you're
    doing the same sort of thing. Why?

  5. Re: The Leopard is BACK!

    This has what to do with OS/2?

    Shouldn't you be posting this to apple NGs instead of OS/2 or eCS
    groups? Two years ago you were flaming pretty hard, and even threatened
    legal action, when someone posted eCS info in an OS/2 group. Now you're
    doing the same sort of thing. Why?

  6. [FUD4] : The Leopard is BACK!

    On Wed, 21 Nov 2007 03:11:25 UTC, Jeff Estep wrote:

    -> This has what to do with OS/2?
    ->
    -> Shouldn't you be posting this to apple NGs instead of OS/2 or eCS
    -> groups? Two years ago you were flaming pretty hard, and even threatened
    -> legal action, when someone posted eCS info in an OS/2 group. Now you're
    -> doing the same sort of thing. Why?

    Its not the same thing. eComstation is based on OS/2. Mac OS X has
    nothing to do with OS/2 other than being an alternative to the
    predatory micro$oft monopoly.

    Please stop feeding the psycho-troll. If you must respond to his
    drivel, please put the tag [FUD4] in the subject. Thank you for not
    quoting his latest lies and mis-information. See
    http://www.mr2ice.com/TMFaq/ for more on the OS/2 groups resident
    psycho-troll.

    Mark

    --
    From the eComStation of Mark Dodel

    Warpstock 2007 - Toronto, Ontario, Canada: http://www.warpstock.org
    Warpstock Europe - Valkenswaard close to Eindhoven, the Netherlands:
    http://www.warpstock.eu

  7. [FUD4] : The Leopard is BACK!

    On Wed, 21 Nov 2007 03:11:25 UTC, Jeff Estep wrote:

    -> This has what to do with OS/2?
    ->
    -> Shouldn't you be posting this to apple NGs instead of OS/2 or eCS
    -> groups? Two years ago you were flaming pretty hard, and even threatened
    -> legal action, when someone posted eCS info in an OS/2 group. Now you're
    -> doing the same sort of thing. Why?

    Its not the same thing. eComstation is based on OS/2. Mac OS X has
    nothing to do with OS/2 other than being an alternative to the
    predatory micro$oft monopoly.

    Please stop feeding the psycho-troll. If you must respond to his
    drivel, please put the tag [FUD4] in the subject. Thank you for not
    quoting his latest lies and mis-information. See
    http://www.mr2ice.com/TMFaq/ for more on the OS/2 groups resident
    psycho-troll.

    Mark

    --
    From the eComStation of Mark Dodel

    Warpstock 2007 - Toronto, Ontario, Canada: http://www.warpstock.org
    Warpstock Europe - Valkenswaard close to Eindhoven, the Netherlands:
    http://www.warpstock.eu

  8. Re: The Leopard is BACK!

    Dear Dr. Tim,
    Do you have any hobbies that actually accomplish something worthwhile?



  9. Re: The Leopard is BACK!

    Dear Dr. Tim,
    Do you have any hobbies that actually accomplish something worthwhile?



  10. Re: The [FUD4]ster is BACK!

    Jeff/Larry/Ron/Nick/Meng/Sally/Susan/whoever wrote:
    > With the touch of a key the two displays move to a whole new
    > clean desktop. Touch the key again and I go to another clean
    > desktop. Hit the F6 key and I have all four screen displayed in a 4-
    > way grid. Each space can be used for a specific project and I can
    > move files, apps, photos, movies, etc., from one space to the other by
    > dragging. It is totally amazing.
    >
    > You will NEVER see that in OS/2 or eComStation and it comes free with
    > OS X (OS 10).


    We've had that with some EWS since Warp 3, early 90's. Where have you been?

    --
    [Reverse the parts of the e-mail address to reply.]

  11. Re: The [FUD4]ster is BACK!

    Jeff/Larry/Ron/Nick/Meng/Sally/Susan/whoever wrote:
    > With the touch of a key the two displays move to a whole new
    > clean desktop. Touch the key again and I go to another clean
    > desktop. Hit the F6 key and I have all four screen displayed in a 4-
    > way grid. Each space can be used for a specific project and I can
    > move files, apps, photos, movies, etc., from one space to the other by
    > dragging. It is totally amazing.
    >
    > You will NEVER see that in OS/2 or eComStation and it comes free with
    > OS X (OS 10).


    We've had that with some EWS since Warp 3, early 90's. Where have you been?

    --
    [Reverse the parts of the e-mail address to reply.]

  12. Re: The Leopard is BACK!

    On Nov 21, 7:09 am, "dinkmeister" wrote:
    > Dear Dr. Tim,
    > Do you have any hobbies that actually accomplish something worthwhile?


    Thanks for asking, Dink. I do have hobbies that accomplish quite a
    bit of worthiness. I also have a very busy professional life and a
    healthy devotion to computing because it is such an ingrained part of
    our lives now. You may not know that I live with four handsome and
    beautiful Irish Setters. Two male, two female. Wonderful animals -
    alive, spirited, intelligent, loving and very stunning to behold.
    Each one with a distinct personality and each the love of my life.
    Life without them would be cruel.

    On another note and referring back to "Spaces" in OS X and responding
    to one who claims that "We've had that with *some* EWS (not sure what
    the reference is, perhaps English, Welsh and Scottish Railway Ltd or
    Embedded Web Server perhaps?) since Warp 3..."

    What OS/2 offered wasn't Spaces at all. OS/2 offered something called
    "Work Areas" which in no way resembles OS X's Spaces today. Work
    Areas were prone to crash and were really a concept and little more -
    although they were offered in OS/2 - they were very limited in scope
    and you could not drag one item from one work area into another -
    although a third party vendor did try to implement the trick, it was
    never successfully pulled off and resulted in a system hang. And if I
    recall, Stardock came out with something called "Virtual Desktops" as
    part of the Object Desk package but that too was prone to hang or
    crash the system, just as limited in scope as described above and was
    never a practical or usable feature.

    Whereas OS X's Spaces is not only usable and practical, it is
    downright amazing. It allows the creation a large number of "virtual
    spaces" that can interchange with each other, can be seen as a grid
    and that grid can allow the exchange or transfer of files, data,
    programs you may be working on in one space. Spaces don't close when
    you move to them, they jet-slide across the screen from whatever
    direction you chose and they do it with grace, charm and stability.
    The first time it happens you think to yourself how cool!""

    A fine example of how Spaces work sofr me is what I often do on a day-
    to-day basis. I will open one Space for general work day items (mail,
    report writing, Net surfing, file downloading), another Space
    specifically for the work being done for a client, another Space for
    movie editing and rendering, another Space for music editing, ringtone
    creations, CD or DVD burning and printing and another Space for blog
    writing and website updating. If I want to use the CD or DVD burning
    features being utilized in Space 3 I just grid the screen (by pressing
    the designated F6 key) and drag the program from Space 3 (in this case
    Toast) into Space 1. It is all done seamlessly and beautifully. And
    I don't have to collapse the grid, I can work in each Space
    independently or as a whole. On a 13" MacBook such a grid
    configuration would be difficult and cumbersome. But it would be
    quite practical on the MacBook to switch between each space. On a 60"
    wide HD screen working with the full grid is awesome and when I want
    the whole screen to work in just one Space I just click on the Space!
    And you never have to close them up entirely, just move to a clean
    Space when you need a clean work area.

    OS/2, in all of its incarnations and glory, never had that ability.
    Perhaps the concept but never the true ability. And neither will eCS.

    I hope this answers all of your questions, Dink.

    Dr. Tim Martin, The OS/2 Guy
    Visit The OS/2 Guy Blog Today
    http://www.os2guy.com



  13. Re: The Leopard is BACK!

    On Nov 21, 7:09 am, "dinkmeister" wrote:
    > Dear Dr. Tim,
    > Do you have any hobbies that actually accomplish something worthwhile?


    Thanks for asking, Dink. I do have hobbies that accomplish quite a
    bit of worthiness. I also have a very busy professional life and a
    healthy devotion to computing because it is such an ingrained part of
    our lives now. You may not know that I live with four handsome and
    beautiful Irish Setters. Two male, two female. Wonderful animals -
    alive, spirited, intelligent, loving and very stunning to behold.
    Each one with a distinct personality and each the love of my life.
    Life without them would be cruel.

    On another note and referring back to "Spaces" in OS X and responding
    to one who claims that "We've had that with *some* EWS (not sure what
    the reference is, perhaps English, Welsh and Scottish Railway Ltd or
    Embedded Web Server perhaps?) since Warp 3..."

    What OS/2 offered wasn't Spaces at all. OS/2 offered something called
    "Work Areas" which in no way resembles OS X's Spaces today. Work
    Areas were prone to crash and were really a concept and little more -
    although they were offered in OS/2 - they were very limited in scope
    and you could not drag one item from one work area into another -
    although a third party vendor did try to implement the trick, it was
    never successfully pulled off and resulted in a system hang. And if I
    recall, Stardock came out with something called "Virtual Desktops" as
    part of the Object Desk package but that too was prone to hang or
    crash the system, just as limited in scope as described above and was
    never a practical or usable feature.

    Whereas OS X's Spaces is not only usable and practical, it is
    downright amazing. It allows the creation a large number of "virtual
    spaces" that can interchange with each other, can be seen as a grid
    and that grid can allow the exchange or transfer of files, data,
    programs you may be working on in one space. Spaces don't close when
    you move to them, they jet-slide across the screen from whatever
    direction you chose and they do it with grace, charm and stability.
    The first time it happens you think to yourself how cool!""

    A fine example of how Spaces work sofr me is what I often do on a day-
    to-day basis. I will open one Space for general work day items (mail,
    report writing, Net surfing, file downloading), another Space
    specifically for the work being done for a client, another Space for
    movie editing and rendering, another Space for music editing, ringtone
    creations, CD or DVD burning and printing and another Space for blog
    writing and website updating. If I want to use the CD or DVD burning
    features being utilized in Space 3 I just grid the screen (by pressing
    the designated F6 key) and drag the program from Space 3 (in this case
    Toast) into Space 1. It is all done seamlessly and beautifully. And
    I don't have to collapse the grid, I can work in each Space
    independently or as a whole. On a 13" MacBook such a grid
    configuration would be difficult and cumbersome. But it would be
    quite practical on the MacBook to switch between each space. On a 60"
    wide HD screen working with the full grid is awesome and when I want
    the whole screen to work in just one Space I just click on the Space!
    And you never have to close them up entirely, just move to a clean
    Space when you need a clean work area.

    OS/2, in all of its incarnations and glory, never had that ability.
    Perhaps the concept but never the true ability. And neither will eCS.

    I hope this answers all of your questions, Dink.

    Dr. Tim Martin, The OS/2 Guy
    Visit The OS/2 Guy Blog Today
    http://www.os2guy.com



  14. Re: The [FUD4]ster is BACK!

    In article ,
    Marty wrote:
    >Jeff/Larry/Ron/Nick/Meng/Sally/Susan/whoever wrote:
    >> You will NEVER see that in OS/2 or eComStation and it comes free with
    >> OS X (OS 10).

    >
    >We've had that with some EWS since Warp 3, early 90's. Where have you been?


    He's been out of touch... with reality, not just OS/2.

    As for having something like "Space" bundled with the OS, ePager was bundled
    with eCS 1.2 (probably other releases too). I use it a lot. It works
    differently to "Space", but accomplishes the same tasks.

    --
    Don Hills (dmhills at attglobaldotnet) Wellington, New Zealand
    "New interface closely resembles Presentation Manager,
    preparing you for the wonders of OS/2!"
    -- Advertisement on the box for Microsoft Windows 2.11 for 286

  15. Re: The [FUD4] is BACK!

    Tim/Nick/Ron/Jeff/Larry/Meng/Susan/whoever wrote:
    > On another note and referring back to "Spaces" in OS X and responding
    > to one who claims that "We've had that with *some* EWS (not sure what
    > the reference is, perhaps English, Welsh and Scottish Railway Ltd or
    > Embedded Web Server perhaps?) since Warp 3..."


    Have you ever used OS/2? You don't know what Employee Written Software
    is?? LOL

    > What OS/2 offered wasn't Spaces at all. OS/2 offered something called
    > "Work Areas" which in no way resembles OS X's Spaces today. Work
    > Areas were prone to crash and were really a concept and little more -


    "Prone to crash"? Either the application (9Lives is the one I liked)
    worked or it didn't. You couldn't have one "crash" while the others
    were still up because they were controlled by an application. So as
    usual, your statement is unfounded and complete nonsense. Of course,
    there were also other environments that allowed multiple logins too,
    which were separate and independent of each other.

    > although they were offered in OS/2 - they were very limited in scope
    > and you could not drag one item from one work area into another -


    Yes, you could. You could have sticky windows (appearing on some or all
    desktops), and select which windows are "sticky" by either the
    application name that owns them or the window title. You use the right
    mouse button to drag them around and part of a window can exist across
    multiple areas at the same time. You can switch desktops with a hot key
    or by moving the mouse to a particular edge or corner of the screen.
    Highly configurable, very stable, well implemented, and had it almost 2
    decades ago. LOL

    I feel like I'm trying to explain a light bulb to a prehistoric human
    who just thawed from a glacier.

    --
    [Reverse the parts of the e-mail address to reply.]

  16. Re: The [FUD4] is BACK!

    Tim/Nick/Ron/Jeff/Larry/Meng/Susan/whoever wrote:
    > On another note and referring back to "Spaces" in OS X and responding
    > to one who claims that "We've had that with *some* EWS (not sure what
    > the reference is, perhaps English, Welsh and Scottish Railway Ltd or
    > Embedded Web Server perhaps?) since Warp 3..."


    Have you ever used OS/2? You don't know what Employee Written Software
    is?? LOL

    > What OS/2 offered wasn't Spaces at all. OS/2 offered something called
    > "Work Areas" which in no way resembles OS X's Spaces today. Work
    > Areas were prone to crash and were really a concept and little more -


    "Prone to crash"? Either the application (9Lives is the one I liked)
    worked or it didn't. You couldn't have one "crash" while the others
    were still up because they were controlled by an application. So as
    usual, your statement is unfounded and complete nonsense. Of course,
    there were also other environments that allowed multiple logins too,
    which were separate and independent of each other.

    > although they were offered in OS/2 - they were very limited in scope
    > and you could not drag one item from one work area into another -


    Yes, you could. You could have sticky windows (appearing on some or all
    desktops), and select which windows are "sticky" by either the
    application name that owns them or the window title. You use the right
    mouse button to drag them around and part of a window can exist across
    multiple areas at the same time. You can switch desktops with a hot key
    or by moving the mouse to a particular edge or corner of the screen.
    Highly configurable, very stable, well implemented, and had it almost 2
    decades ago. LOL

    I feel like I'm trying to explain a light bulb to a prehistoric human
    who just thawed from a glacier.

    --
    [Reverse the parts of the e-mail address to reply.]

  17. Re: The [FUD4] is BACK!

    On Sun, 25 Nov 2007 22:41:52 UTC, Marty
    wrote:

    -> Tim/Nick/Ron/Jeff/Larry/Meng/Susan/whoever wrote:
    -> > On another note and referring back to "Spaces" in OS X and responding
    -> > to one who claims that "We've had that with *some* EWS (not sure what
    -> > the reference is, perhaps English, Welsh and Scottish Railway Ltd or
    -> > Embedded Web Server perhaps?) since Warp 3..."
    ->
    -> Have you ever used OS/2? You don't know what Employee Written Software
    -> is?? LOL

    I added comp.sys.mac.system so the folks there can see what a clown
    the self-proclaimed "OS/2guy" is. Also since the troll is hawking
    Macs now, the thread really belongs in a Mac group, not an OS/2 one.
    Hopefully he knows more about OS X then he pretends to know about
    OS/2. And he has been trolling the comp.os2 groups for over a decade,
    using many different identities (hense Marty's string of
    Tim/Nick/etc). He attacks real OS/2 users and developers. BTW, Marty
    is a well known OS/2 developer, while tim martin is just a well known
    troll.

    ->
    -> > What OS/2 offered wasn't Spaces at all. OS/2 offered something called
    -> > "Work Areas" which in no way resembles OS X's Spaces today. Work
    -> > Areas were prone to crash and were really a concept and little more -
    ->
    -> "Prone to crash"? Either the application (9Lives is the one I liked)
    -> worked or it didn't. You couldn't have one "crash" while the others
    -> were still up because they were controlled by an application. So as
    -> usual, your statement is unfounded and complete nonsense. Of course,
    -> there were also other environments that allowed multiple logins too,
    -> which were separate and independent of each other.
    ->
    -> > although they were offered in OS/2 - they were very limited in scope
    -> > and you could not drag one item from one work area into another -
    ->

    What a moron. Work Areas under OS/2 are special folders that will
    automatically open contained objects and close them when you close the
    folder. Saves time if you routinely open the same programs or
    documents for a regular task. I used them for years and it has never
    had problems with crashing. The psycho-troll is just being his usual
    nitwit, lying self. It has nothing to do with virtual desktops, which
    is what Spaces is. OS/2 has had virtual desktops for over a decade
    from several free and commercial third party utilities as Marty has
    pointed out. And the latest version of OS/2, eComStation has virtual
    desktops builtin with ePager. Not quite as sophisticated as Spaces,
    but it works well. And like Marty points out, it has stickey windows
    and the ability to move a window from one desktop to another and other
    features.

    -> Yes, you could. You could have sticky windows (appearing on some or all
    -> desktops), and select which windows are "sticky" by either the
    -> application name that owns them or the window title. You use the right
    -> mouse button to drag them around and part of a window can exist across
    -> multiple areas at the same time. You can switch desktops with a hot key
    -> or by moving the mouse to a particular edge or corner of the screen.
    -> Highly configurable, very stable, well implemented, and had it almost 2
    -> decades ago. LOL
    ->
    -> I feel like I'm trying to explain a light bulb to a prehistoric human
    -> who just thawed from a glacier.
    ->

    He's a complete idiot and pathological liar. Anyone that takes advise
    from this schmuck should be aware that he will lie about everything,
    though he knows enough to sometimes sound convincing. He also likes to
    post with sock-puppet IDs and have fake conversations with himself to
    make himself look like a big shot, when in fact he's a pathetic little
    scumbag. The OS/2 community actually made up a system to deal with
    him, thatis how bad it was. He disappeared for a year while he
    embraced Mac OS X but has come back to harass the comp.os2 groups
    again. Best to ignore him. For more on this freak see
    http://www.mr2ice.com/TMFaq/

    Mark


    --
    From the eComStation of Mark Dodel

    Warpstock 2007 - Toronto, Ontario, Canada: http://www.warpstock.org
    Warpstock Europe - Valkenswaard close to Eindhoven, the Netherlands:
    http://www.warpstock.eu

  18. Re: The [FUD4] is BACK!

    On Sun, 25 Nov 2007 22:41:52 UTC, Marty
    wrote:

    -> Tim/Nick/Ron/Jeff/Larry/Meng/Susan/whoever wrote:
    -> > On another note and referring back to "Spaces" in OS X and responding
    -> > to one who claims that "We've had that with *some* EWS (not sure what
    -> > the reference is, perhaps English, Welsh and Scottish Railway Ltd or
    -> > Embedded Web Server perhaps?) since Warp 3..."
    ->
    -> Have you ever used OS/2? You don't know what Employee Written Software
    -> is?? LOL

    I added comp.sys.mac.system so the folks there can see what a clown
    the self-proclaimed "OS/2guy" is. Also since the troll is hawking
    Macs now, the thread really belongs in a Mac group, not an OS/2 one.
    Hopefully he knows more about OS X then he pretends to know about
    OS/2. And he has been trolling the comp.os2 groups for over a decade,
    using many different identities (hense Marty's string of
    Tim/Nick/etc). He attacks real OS/2 users and developers. BTW, Marty
    is a well known OS/2 developer, while tim martin is just a well known
    troll.

    ->
    -> > What OS/2 offered wasn't Spaces at all. OS/2 offered something called
    -> > "Work Areas" which in no way resembles OS X's Spaces today. Work
    -> > Areas were prone to crash and were really a concept and little more -
    ->
    -> "Prone to crash"? Either the application (9Lives is the one I liked)
    -> worked or it didn't. You couldn't have one "crash" while the others
    -> were still up because they were controlled by an application. So as
    -> usual, your statement is unfounded and complete nonsense. Of course,
    -> there were also other environments that allowed multiple logins too,
    -> which were separate and independent of each other.
    ->
    -> > although they were offered in OS/2 - they were very limited in scope
    -> > and you could not drag one item from one work area into another -
    ->

    What a moron. Work Areas under OS/2 are special folders that will
    automatically open contained objects and close them when you close the
    folder. Saves time if you routinely open the same programs or
    documents for a regular task. I used them for years and it has never
    had problems with crashing. The psycho-troll is just being his usual
    nitwit, lying self. It has nothing to do with virtual desktops, which
    is what Spaces is. OS/2 has had virtual desktops for over a decade
    from several free and commercial third party utilities as Marty has
    pointed out. And the latest version of OS/2, eComStation has virtual
    desktops builtin with ePager. Not quite as sophisticated as Spaces,
    but it works well. And like Marty points out, it has stickey windows
    and the ability to move a window from one desktop to another and other
    features.

    -> Yes, you could. You could have sticky windows (appearing on some or all
    -> desktops), and select which windows are "sticky" by either the
    -> application name that owns them or the window title. You use the right
    -> mouse button to drag them around and part of a window can exist across
    -> multiple areas at the same time. You can switch desktops with a hot key
    -> or by moving the mouse to a particular edge or corner of the screen.
    -> Highly configurable, very stable, well implemented, and had it almost 2
    -> decades ago. LOL
    ->
    -> I feel like I'm trying to explain a light bulb to a prehistoric human
    -> who just thawed from a glacier.
    ->

    He's a complete idiot and pathological liar. Anyone that takes advise
    from this schmuck should be aware that he will lie about everything,
    though he knows enough to sometimes sound convincing. He also likes to
    post with sock-puppet IDs and have fake conversations with himself to
    make himself look like a big shot, when in fact he's a pathetic little
    scumbag. The OS/2 community actually made up a system to deal with
    him, thatis how bad it was. He disappeared for a year while he
    embraced Mac OS X but has come back to harass the comp.os2 groups
    again. Best to ignore him. For more on this freak see
    http://www.mr2ice.com/TMFaq/

    Mark


    --
    From the eComStation of Mark Dodel

    Warpstock 2007 - Toronto, Ontario, Canada: http://www.warpstock.org
    Warpstock Europe - Valkenswaard close to Eindhoven, the Netherlands:
    http://www.warpstock.eu

  19. Re: The [FUD4] is BACK!

    Mark Dodel wrote:
    > On Sun, 25 Nov 2007 22:41:52 UTC, Marty
    > wrote:
    >
    > -> Tim/Nick/Ron/Jeff/Larry/Meng/Susan/whoever wrote:
    > -> > On another note and referring back to "Spaces" in OS X and responding
    > -> > to one who claims that "We've had that with *some* EWS (not sure what
    > -> > the reference is, perhaps English, Welsh and Scottish Railway Ltd or
    > -> > Embedded Web Server perhaps?) since Warp 3..."
    > ->
    > -> Have you ever used OS/2? You don't know what Employee Written Software
    > -> is?? LOL
    >

    As if there were any doubt, os2guy is a totally bogus moniker for
    Timmy. Anyone that knows OS/2 knows what EWS references even if they
    don't know all of the applications that are available.


  20. Re: The [FUD4] is BACK!

    Mark Dodel wrote:
    > On Sun, 25 Nov 2007 22:41:52 UTC, Marty
    > wrote:
    >
    > -> Tim/Nick/Ron/Jeff/Larry/Meng/Susan/whoever wrote:
    > -> > On another note and referring back to "Spaces" in OS X and responding
    > -> > to one who claims that "We've had that with *some* EWS (not sure what
    > -> > the reference is, perhaps English, Welsh and Scottish Railway Ltd or
    > -> > Embedded Web Server perhaps?) since Warp 3..."
    > ->
    > -> Have you ever used OS/2? You don't know what Employee Written Software
    > -> is?? LOL
    >

    As if there were any doubt, os2guy is a totally bogus moniker for
    Timmy. Anyone that knows OS/2 knows what EWS references even if they
    don't know all of the applications that are available.


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