NTP Sync Problem - NTP

This is a discussion on NTP Sync Problem - NTP ; Ron C. wrote: > "Richard B. gilbert" wrote in message news:45F2BCCC.3050806@comcast.net... > >>Why >>in the world are you still using W98? > > > My 1996 $6000 Laptop is only 133MHz. I've used trial versions of Windows XP and Windows ...

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Thread: NTP Sync Problem

  1. Re: NTP Sync Problem

    Ron C. wrote:
    > "Richard B. gilbert" wrote in message news:45F2BCCC.3050806@comcast.net...
    >
    >>Why
    >>in the world are you still using W98?

    >
    >
    > My 1996 $6000 Laptop is only 133MHz. I've used trial versions of Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 on it but they're way too slow scrolling through documents; even Win98 slowed things down noticibly compared to Win95; also the sound driver didn't work and Toshiba had no XP update.
    >


    New laptops start at about $700 US! You get a 2 GHz processor for your
    money, 512 MB of RAM and a 40 GB disk.

    I'm quite fond of W/XP because I can run it for weeks or months without
    rebooting. With W98 I was lucky to get eight hours between reboots.

    And, of course, there's the fact that today's software runs on it.


  2. Re: NTP Sync Problem

    Ron C. wrote:
    > "Richard B. gilbert" wrote in message news:45F2BCCC.3050806@comcast.net...
    >> Why
    >> in the world are you still using W98?

    >
    > My 1996 $6000 Laptop is only 133MHz. I've used trial versions of Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 on it but they're way too slow scrolling through documents; even Win98 slowed things down noticibly compared to Win95; also the sound driver didn't work and Toshiba had no XP update.
    >
    >> It was obsoleted seven years ago

    >
    > but supported until last July.
    >
    >> by W2K which offers much better reliability

    >
    > Win98 works with my hardware and has been reliable enough. As an added bonus, which I'm now spoiled by, the tiny fan broke years ago so it's as quiet as a PDA. This is very important when it's on 24/7.
    >
    >> and W2K has since been
    >> obsoleted by W/XP which is still better.

    >
    > I think you mean more feature-rich if you have the hardware to support it. I've made several visits to CompUSA over the years and marveled at how sluggish the XP machines behave even with 1 GHz processors. When I click on something it's as if the XP machine is saying "aw shucks, you want me to do something...well ok just be patient while I run through several million lines of code to figure out what you want."
    >
    > I agree it's about time to upgrade. Applications and web pages have become too complex (and inefficient) for a 133 MHz chip. I'm looking into a 1.5 GHz Vista Ultimate machine from OQO, which is still not powerful enough to run Aero-Glass. If it feels sluggish, well, I still have my Win98 disk! I just hope I don't notice the sound of the fan.
    >


    Get NISTime for your Win98 PC. The URL is here:

    ftp://time.nist.gov/pub/daytime/nistime-32bit.exe

    It can be configured to use NTP servers as well as daytime servers. It
    can be configured to contact a selected time server at periodic
    intervals. This might be the way to go if you just need a close
    approximation of time and not millisecond accuracy. If you tinker with
    it enough, you can get it to run completely in the background, too, but
    the method isn't completely obvious.

    Assuming that you have Client for Microsoft Networks installed on the
    other PCs in your network, you may be able to use this command to get
    time from your PC:

    net time \\your_pc /set /yes

    It's simply more polite to do it this way than to install NISTime onto
    every PC on your network.

    As for XP, it can be made to run quickly on modern hardware. It likes
    the same things that both Win95 and Win98 liked: more memory, more
    processor, faster hardware, fast video drivers, startup programs
    removed, animations and other visual tricks disabled, virus scanners set
    up to scan files at the right time, and so on and so forth. Don't base
    your opinion on a CompUSA demo PC: It was probably set up to woo people
    with eye candy, plus there's a lot a software preload junk that hasn't
    been removed yet.

    I'll leave it to others here to push the virtues of FreeBSD or Linux on
    an old boat-anchor PC to serve the time and be a 24/7 print server...

    Michael

  3. Re: NTP Sync Problem


    "Michael L. Semon" wrote in message news:aNMIh.1477$Tq5.232@trnddc02...

    > Get NISTime for your Win98 PC. The URL is here:
    >
    > ftp://time.nist.gov/pub/daytime/nistime-32bit.exe
    >
    > It can be configured to use NTP servers as well as daytime servers. It
    > can be configured to contact a selected time server at periodic
    > intervals. This might be the way to go if you just need a close
    > approximation of time and not millisecond accuracy. If you tinker with
    > it enough, you can get it to run completely in the background, too, but
    > the method isn't completely obvious.


    Yes I've been using it for years. I got it to run in the background (sort of) by using another free program called "Icon Corral". This thread was about syncing my router which gains 8 min per day.

    > As for XP, it can be made to run quickly on modern hardware. It likes
    > the same things that both Win95 and Win98 liked: more memory, more
    > processor, faster hardware, fast video drivers, startup programs
    > removed, animations and other visual tricks disabled, virus scanners set
    > up to scan files at the right time, and so on and so forth. Don't base
    > your opinion on a CompUSA demo PC: It was probably set up to woo people
    > with eye candy, plus there's a lot a software preload junk that hasn't
    > been removed yet.


    You're right. I believe that the Black Viper had some great advice on how to set up XP for gaming. His website disappeared but others have mirrored it. However, my experience speaks for itself. With the same hardware (133 MHz CPU and no fancy graphics chip), this is how these four OSs compare: Win95=snappy, Win98=sluggish but usable, XP and Server 2003=completely unusable.

    > I'll leave it to others here to push the virtues of FreeBSD or Linux on
    > an old boat-anchor PC to serve the time and be a 24/7 print server...


    Shhhhhh. My computer says "who you callin' a boat anchor? Besides I'm already a 24/7 print server and keep my time sycn'd just fine, all in the background. I could do a lot more, but my owner hasn't learned any programming since FORTRAN."

  4. Re: NTP Sync Problem


    "Richard B. gilbert" wrote in message news:45F38DC8.2040005@comcast.net...
    > New laptops start at about $700 US! You get a 2 GHz processor for your
    > money, 512 MB of RAM and a 40 GB disk.
    >
    > I'm quite fond of W/XP because I can run it for weeks or months without
    > rebooting. With W98 I was lucky to get eight hours between reboots.
    >
    > And, of course, there's the fact that today's software runs on it.


    I'm sure you're right on all three points. My motive was not to save money. I tend to hang on to the old stuff to prevent (it and its peripherals) from going to waste prematurely. Also, I've been keeping up with the tech news all along and there is always one more thing I want to wait for before taking the plunge again. For example, built-in 802.11n, EVDO rev. A, ultra-wideband bluetooth, 64-bit Vista with all the patches and driver support. Keep in mind that a more capable computer could also cause me to waste more time using it!

  5. Re: NTP Sync Problem

    Ron C. wrote:
    >> I'll leave it to others here to push the virtues of FreeBSD or
    >> Linux on an old boat-anchor PC to serve the time and be a 24/7
    >> print server...

    >
    > Shhhhhh. My computer says "who you callin' a boat anchor? Besides
    > I'm already a 24/7 print server and keep my time sycn'd just fine,
    > all in the background. I could do a lot more, but my owner hasn't
    > learned any programming since FORTRAN."
    >


    There's nothing wrong with FORTRAN... I wrote a lot of FORTRAN code.

    Danny
    _______________________________________________
    questions mailing list
    questions@lists.ntp.isc.org
    https://lists.ntp.isc.org/mailman/listinfo/questions


  6. Re: NTP Sync Problem

    Richard B. gilbert wrote:
    > Ron C. wrote:
    >
    >> "Richard B. gilbert" wrote in message
    >> news:45F2BCCC.3050806@comcast.net...
    >>
    >>> Why in the world are you still using W98?

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> My 1996 $6000 Laptop is only 133MHz. I've used trial versions of
    >> Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 on it but they're way too slow
    >> scrolling through documents; even Win98 slowed things down noticibly
    >> compared to Win95; also the sound driver didn't work and Toshiba had
    >> no XP update.
    >>

    >
    > New laptops start at about $700 US! You get a 2 GHz processor for your
    > money, 512 MB of RAM and a 40 GB disk.
    >
    > I'm quite fond of W/XP because I can run it for weeks or months without
    > rebooting. With W98 I was lucky to get eight hours between reboots.
    >
    > And, of course, there's the fact that today's software runs on it.
    >

    I still have the first PC I bought for work in 1992 up and running.
    An 80386DX33 upgraded to AMD8036DX5-133 with Novell Dos 7 and Win 3.1.
    Got a bigger HD in 1996 and a new fan in 2000. Used to be running 24/7
    till last year.

    You do not get that kind of endurance out of newer hardware. NADA, never.
    Aditionally I have never been able to contact one of those people that
    have bought a "just switch it on and work with it" Windows machines.
    All persons I ask have endless hassles and loose functionality that used
    to work with some update or new driver.

    uwe





  7. Re: NTP Sync Problem

    On Mar 12, 3:52 am, Uwe Klein
    wrote:
    > You do not get that kind of endurance out of newer hardware. NADA, never.


    Well, that's sort of hard to disprove, because newer hardware hasn't
    had time to run as long. But I do have several white-box 450 MHz PCs
    from 1999 in my organization that run XP just fine, no new hardware
    required. That's 7+ years without a whimper. Of course they were
    loaded top-of-theline machines back then.

    If anything, my experience is that newer hardware is *more* reliable
    than 1990s era hardware. I remember replacing NICs, RAM sticks, HDs,
    and even Mobos all the time back when I worked the help desk in 1996.
    These days, our help desk guys have to do a hardware level repair
    about once a month (with a similar user population).

    ---
    RPM


  8. Re: NTP Sync Problem

    Quoting Ryan Malayter :

    > On Mar 12, 3:52 am, Uwe Klein
    > wrote:
    >> You do not get that kind of endurance out of newer hardware. NADA, never.

    >
    > Well, that's sort of hard to disprove, because newer hardware hasn't
    > had time to run as long. But I do have several white-box 450 MHz PCs
    > from 1999 in my organization that run XP just fine, no new hardware
    > required. That's 7+ years without a whimper. Of course they were
    > loaded top-of-theline machines back then.
    >
    > If anything, my experience is that newer hardware is *more* reliable
    > than 1990s era hardware. I remember replacing NICs, RAM sticks, HDs,
    > and even Mobos all the time back when I worked the help desk in 1996.
    > These days, our help desk guys have to do a hardware level repair
    > about once a month (with a similar user population).
    >
    > ---
    > RPM
    >
    > _______________________________________________
    > questions mailing list
    > questions@lists.ntp.isc.org
    > https://lists.ntp.isc.org/mailman/listinfo/questions
    >


    This conversation reminds me of my grandfather talking about how great
    his Model A coupe was. With the 2 clutch pedals (one for reverse) and
    the 4 cycl. engine, running on the paved brick streets of Baltimore in
    the early 40's.

    --
    Dwayne Hottinger
    Network Administrator
    Harrisonburg City Public Schools

    _______________________________________________
    questions mailing list
    questions@lists.ntp.isc.org
    https://lists.ntp.isc.org/mailman/listinfo/questions


  9. Re: NTP Sync Problem

    dhottinger@harrisonburg.k12.va.us wrote:

    > This conversation reminds me of my grandfather talking about how great
    > his Model A coupe was. With the 2 clutch pedals (one for reverse) and
    > the 4 cycl. engine, running on the paved brick streets of Baltimore in
    > the early 40's.

    can't talk about the 40ties, my oldest motor vehicle is from 1956 ;-)

    uwe
    >


  10. Re: NTP Sync Problem

    Danny Mayer wrote:
    > Ron C. wrote:
    >
    >>>I'll leave it to others here to push the virtues of FreeBSD or
    >>>Linux on an old boat-anchor PC to serve the time and be a 24/7
    >>>print server...

    >>
    >>Shhhhhh. My computer says "who you callin' a boat anchor? Besides
    >>I'm already a 24/7 print server and keep my time sycn'd just fine,
    >>all in the background. I could do a lot more, but my owner hasn't
    >>learned any programming since FORTRAN."
    >>

    >
    >
    > There's nothing wrong with FORTRAN... I wrote a lot of FORTRAN code.
    >


    I also! There are jobs for which FORTRAN is the tool of choice. There
    are other jobs for which it is totally unsuited. Knowing which language
    is best matched to the problem to be solved is part of the art of
    programming.



  11. Re: NTP Sync Problem

    Uwe Klein wrote:
    > Richard B. gilbert wrote:
    >
    >> Ron C. wrote:
    >>
    >>> "Richard B. gilbert" wrote in message
    >>> news:45F2BCCC.3050806@comcast.net...
    >>>
    >>>> Why in the world are you still using W98?


    > I still have the first PC I bought for work in 1992 up and running.
    > An 80386DX33 upgraded to AMD8036DX5-133 with Novell Dos 7 and Win 3.1.
    > Got a bigger HD in 1996 and a new fan in 2000. Used to be running 24/7
    > till last year.
    >
    > You do not get that kind of endurance out of newer hardware. NADA, never.
    > Aditionally I have never been able to contact one of those people that
    > have bought a "just switch it on and work with it" Windows machines.
    > All persons I ask have endless hassles and loose functionality that used
    > to work with some update or new driver.
    >


    I prefer not to endure the daily, or even more frequent, reboots
    required by Windows 3.1, W95, and W98. W2K was the first version of
    windows to eliminate the MSDOS underpinnings of earlier versions. I
    found the difference in W2K most striking! Some of the hardware these
    older O/Ss ran on is able to run Free BSD or some flavor of Linux but
    most is now serving as boat anchors, door stops, etc.

    YMMV!



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