logs or stats showing when NTP made changes to the local clock - NTP

This is a discussion on logs or stats showing when NTP made changes to the local clock - NTP ; Can ntpd be made to log this? Can I infer it from the stats? I am particularly interested in step corrections. --- Joe Harvell...

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Thread: logs or stats showing when NTP made changes to the local clock

  1. logs or stats showing when NTP made changes to the local clock

    Can ntpd be made to log this? Can I infer it from the stats? I am
    particularly interested in step corrections.

    ---
    Joe Harvell

  2. Re: logs or stats showing when NTP made changes to the local clock


    >Can ntpd be made to log this? Can I infer it from the stats? I am
    >particularly interested in step corrections.


    grep for "time reset". If your conf file doesn't specify a
    logfile, try looking in syslog.

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  3. Re: logs or stats showing when NTP made changes to the local clock

    Time steps are (also) logged in the wtmp file.

    H

  4. Re: logs or stats showing when NTP made changes to the local clock

    In article ,
    Joseph Harvell wrote:

    > Subject: logs or stats showing when NTP made changes to the local clock


    I suspect a common misunderstanding here. On a better platform, the
    combination of ntpd and the kernel update the clock frequency on every
    timer tick. Even with ntpd version 3, running without kernel support,
    the tweaking was done every four seconds.

    If things are running smoothly, the parameters that control this are
    updated every time a packet is returned from an eligible server.

    > Can ntpd be made to log this? Can I infer it from the stats? I am
    > particularly interested in step corrections.


    Whilst the error recovery steps get included in the system log, recording
    the fine tuning would put an excessive load on the system.

    (The common misunderstanding is that ntpd periodically corrects the time,
    when it actually continuously corrects the frequency.)

  5. Re: logs or stats showing when NTP made changes to the local clock

    David:

    Thanks for clarifying this. I guess I should say I am *only* interested
    in step corrections, not the ongoing slew corrections you are describing.

    David Woolley wrote:
    > In article ,
    > Joseph Harvell wrote:
    >
    >> Subject: logs or stats showing when NTP made changes to the local clock

    >
    > I suspect a common misunderstanding here. On a better platform, the
    > combination of ntpd and the kernel update the clock frequency on every
    > timer tick. Even with ntpd version 3, running without kernel support,
    > the tweaking was done every four seconds.
    >
    > If things are running smoothly, the parameters that control this are
    > updated every time a packet is returned from an eligible server.
    >
    >> Can ntpd be made to log this? Can I infer it from the stats? I am
    >> particularly interested in step corrections.

    >
    > Whilst the error recovery steps get included in the system log, recording
    > the fine tuning would put an excessive load on the system.
    >
    > (The common misunderstanding is that ntpd periodically corrects the time,
    > when it actually continuously corrects the frequency.)


  6. Re: logs or stats showing when NTP made changesto the local clock

    Harlan Stenn wrote:
    > Time steps are (also) logged in the wtmp file.
    >
    > H


    Maybe on some systems but certainly not on Windows. I wasn't even aware
    of this one.

    Danny
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