local reference clock - NTP

This is a discussion on local reference clock - NTP ; I put these lines in the ntp.conf (xntpd) server 127.127.0.1 fudge 127.127.0.1 stratum 10 but still the output of ntpq -p LOCAL(0) LOCAL(0) 10 - - 64 0 0.00 0.000 16000.0 what is wrong?...

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Thread: local reference clock

  1. local reference clock

    I put these lines in the ntp.conf (xntpd)

    server 127.127.0.1
    fudge 127.127.0.1 stratum 10

    but still the output of ntpq -p

    LOCAL(0) LOCAL(0) 10 - - 64 0 0.00 0.000
    16000.0

    what is wrong?


  2. Re: local reference clock

    wrote in message
    news:1151932773.894113.157770@m79g2000cwm.googlegr oups.com...

    > I put these lines in the ntp.conf (xntpd)
    >
    > server 127.127.0.1
    > fudge 127.127.0.1 stratum 10


    Did you type that, or copy&paste it? Because it's wrong. It uses a
    type 0 reference clock (third byte from the left), whereas the local
    clock is type 1.


    > but still the output of ntpq -p
    >
    > LOCAL(0) LOCAL(0) 10 - - 64 0 0.00 0.000
    > 16000.0


    But this line is consistent with a configured server 127.127.1.0. If I
    try the line above, no association shows up at all.


    > what is wrong?


    How long did you wait? Try waiting another two minutes.



  3. Re: local reference clock

    gandalf100@gmail.com wrote:

    > I put these lines in the ntp.conf (xntpd)
    >
    > server 127.127.0.1
    > fudge 127.127.0.1 stratum 10
    >
    > but still the output of ntpq -p
    >
    > LOCAL(0) LOCAL(0) 10 - - 64 0 0.00 0.000
    > 16000.0
    >
    > what is wrong?
    >


    What result did you expect???

    NTP was designed to synchronize computer clocks to Universal Time
    Coordinated (UTC). It does that very well if you configure at least one
    source of time. It would appear that you did not do so.

  4. Re: local reference clock

    In article ,
    Richard B. Gilbert wrote:
    > gandalf100@gmail.com wrote:


    > > I put these lines in the ntp.conf (xntpd)


    xntpd is obsolete, except for one platform, where the vendor insists on
    confusing everyone else by using the old name, claiming it confuses their
    users less. If this really is xntpd, it might explain why it actually
    displays results for the bad clock driver code.

    >
    > server 127.127.0.1
    > fudge 127.127.0.1 stratum 10
    >


    > What result did you expect???


    I imagine he expects time since last poll to be present and less than 64,
    reachability to be 377, the last figure to be pretty small, and the machine
    to serve its, almost certainly, bogus idea of the time to NTP clients.

    > NTP was designed to synchronize computer clocks to Universal Time
    > Coordinated (UTC). It does that very well if you configure at least one
    > source of time. It would appear that you did not do so.


    Whilst I'd agree that this is an abuse of NTP, it is a very common abuse,
    and might even be more common than proper use, because it can do more
    or less what its users expect it to do.

    There are legitimate uses as well, if the clock is being disciplined by
    code outside of NTP, but, statistically, that is unlikely to be the case
    here.

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