Connecting a laptop via wireless - Networking

This is a discussion on Connecting a laptop via wireless - Networking ; My LAN consists of a collection of Linux boxes connected to a hub.My net is 192.168.0, the gateway being at 192.168.0.1. This gateway has two network interfaces, the second one (192.168.1.2) connected to a router. This router also has two ...

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Thread: Connecting a laptop via wireless

  1. Connecting a laptop via wireless

    My LAN consists of a collection of Linux boxes connected to a
    hub.My net is 192.168.0, the gateway being at 192.168.0.1. This gateway
    has two network interfaces, the second one (192.168.1.2) connected to a
    router. This router also has two network interfaces, the internal one
    being at 192.168.1.1 and the external one exposing my fixed IP address to
    the Internet. With this setup all PCs in the 192.168.0 network have full
    internet access.

    I would like to add a Linux laptop L connected via a wireless
    interface to my setup. What I have is a second router R with two
    interfaces. The external one is connected to my hub, and with the IP
    address 192.168.0.20, which is fixed. The internal one is 192.168.2.1.
    When I boot my laptop, it connects to the wireless network managed by R,
    getting its IP address from R by DHCP. This address can of course vary,
    but for the sake of concreteness let's assume it always is 192.168.2.2.

    This configuration works only partially:

    1) L has full Internet access, in the sense that from Firefox it
    can connect to any site.

    2) L does not have access to Internet sites via other protocols
    like FTP and SSH. That is, the connections can be established, but once
    established they just hang.

    3) Something similar happens when from L I try to access the Linux
    boxes in the 192.168.0 network.

    4) The Linux boxes in the 182.168.0 network do not have access to
    L.

    How can I configure things so that issues 2, 3 and 4 get sorted
    out? As you can see my knowledge of networking is pretty basic; please
    bear with me.



  2. Re: Connecting a laptop via wireless

    Harold Weissman wrote:

    > My LAN consists of a collection of Linux boxes connected to a
    > hub.My net is 192.168.0, the gateway being at 192.168.0.1. This gateway
    > has two network interfaces, the second one (192.168.1.2) connected to a
    > router. This router also has two network interfaces, the internal one
    > being at 192.168.1.1 and the external one exposing my fixed IP address to
    > the Internet. With this setup all PCs in the 192.168.0 network have full
    > internet access.


    Your network does appear quite a complicated setup, I'm assuming your
    routers are actually Linux machines rather than dedicated routers such
    as DSL or ADSL types.

    A relatively cheap router box can normally be set up to allow specific
    IP addresses and/or ports.

    A decent wifi router can be bought for just over £20, this can be
    connected to your gateway and should be relatively easy to configure.

    Geoff Lane

  3. Re: Connecting a laptop via wireless

    Harold Weissman écrivait
    news:gcra2b$29d$1@registered.motzarella.org:

    > My LAN consists of a collection of Linux boxes connected to a
    > hub.My net is 192.168.0, the gateway being at 192.168.0.1. This
    > gateway has two network interfaces, the second one (192.168.1.2)
    > connected to a router. This router also has two network interfaces,
    > the internal one being at 192.168.1.1 and the external one exposing my
    > fixed IP address to the Internet. With this setup all PCs in the
    > 192.168.0 network have full internet access.
    >
    > I would like to add a Linux laptop L connected via a wireless
    > interface to my setup. What I have is a second router R with two
    > interfaces. The external one is connected to my hub, and with the IP
    > address 192.168.0.20, which is fixed. The internal one is 192.168.2.1.
    > When I boot my laptop, it connects to the wireless network managed by
    > R, getting its IP address from R by DHCP. This address can of course
    > vary, but for the sake of concreteness let's assume it always is
    > 192.168.2.2.
    >
    > This configuration works only partially:
    >
    > 1) L has full Internet access, in the sense that from Firefox
    > it
    > can connect to any site.
    >
    > 2) L does not have access to Internet sites via other
    > protocols
    > like FTP and SSH. That is, the connections can be established, but
    > once established they just hang.


    Maybe your HTTP connexion use a proxy (included in your wireless access
    ), and traffic is nated on this wireless access-point.

    Concerning FTP protocol, did you test in active and passive mode ? The
    'standard' active mode may be 'bloqued' by the wireless router.

    You must carefully check the filtering and routing parameters of your
    wireless access point (give more information (mark/model, ...).

    > 3) Something similar happens when from L I try to access the
    > Linux
    > boxes in the 192.168.0 network.


    Well. The wireless access point is connected to the 192.168.0, and should
    be available for the 192.168.2 network. You should check :

    - the netmask of the 192.168.0.20 interface on the access point. It
    should be 255.255.255.0 (or /24).

    > 4) The Linux boxes in the 182.168.0 network do not have access
    > to
    > L.


    Now, to be able to communicate from 192.168.0 network to the 192.168.2
    network, you need to add a route on R or on each PC in the 192.168.0
    network :

    - net 192.168.2.0/24 gateway 192.168.0.20

    > How can I configure things so that issues 2, 3 and 4 get
    > sorted
    > out? As you can see my knowledge of networking is pretty basic; please
    > bear with me.


    Regards

  4. Re: Connecting a laptop via wireless

    On Sat, 11 Oct 2008 22:41:15 +0000 (UTC), Harold Weissman wrote:
    > My LAN consists of a collection of Linux boxes connected to a
    > hub.My net is 192.168.0, the gateway being at 192.168.0.1. This gateway
    > has two network interfaces, the second one (192.168.1.2) connected to a
    > router. This router also has two network interfaces, the internal one
    > being at 192.168.1.1 and the external one exposing my fixed IP address to
    > the Internet. With this setup all PCs in the 192.168.0 network have full
    > internet access.
    > I would like to add a Linux laptop L connected via a wireless
    > interface to my setup. What I have is a second router R with two
    > interfaces. The external one is connected to my hub, and with the IP
    > address 192.168.0.20, which is fixed. The internal one is 192.168.2.1.
    > When I boot my laptop, it connects to the wireless network managed by R,
    > getting its IP address from R by DHCP. This address can of course vary,
    > but for the sake of concreteness let's assume it always is 192.168.2.2.
    > This configuration works only partially:
    >...


    I'm not sure why you need such a complicated network. For example,
    why do you need the gateway? Usually a gateway connects networks that
    are isolated somehow, either physically by geography, or perhaps by
    policy. Is that true here?

    Also, did you add the second router because the first does not have
    wireless capability?

    In your network, laptop L will be double NATed, first by the
    new router R and secondly by the original router. This may
    be why FTP doesn't work, but without detailed info about routing
    tables from each of the routers, the gateway, and the laptop,
    I really can't tell.

    If you don't need the gateway, then I'd simply replace the first
    router with the second one, connect the hub and the existing PCs
    directly to it (wired), and connect the laptop L via the router's
    wireless. If you must have the gateway for some reason, then
    I'd get a wireless access point (not a router), connect it to
    the hub and connect the laptop via the wireless access point.

    --
    Dale Dellutri (lose the Q's)

  5. Re: Connecting a laptop via wireless

    Dale Dellutri writes:

    > I'm not sure why you need such a complicated network. For example,
    > why do you need the gateway? Usually a gateway connects networks that
    > are isolated somehow, either physically by geography, or perhaps by
    > policy. Is that true here?




    I've heard that people do this because they bought some game console
    that only supports WEP (not WPA). So they have two subnets at home,
    one for the games, and one for normal (secure) computers.

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