hub vs switch - Networking

This is a discussion on hub vs switch - Networking ; Hi all, these are the differences between hub and switch , which i have read in the book, "A practical guide to Ubuntu Linux", is there any other point important points which the book book has not mentioned Hub A ...

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Thread: hub vs switch

  1. hub vs switch

    Hi all,

    these are the differences between hub and switch , which i have read
    in the book, "A practical guide to Ubuntu Linux", is there any other
    point important points which the book book has not mentioned

    Hub

    A hub (sometimes called a concentrator) is a device that connects
    systems so they are all part of one network segment and share the
    network bandwidth. Hubs work at the physical layer of the IP and OSI
    models (layer 1).

    A nonswitched (hub-based) broadcast network can run in only half-
    duplex mode.

    Switch

    A switch connects network segments. A switch inspects each data packet
    and learns which devices are connected to which of its ports. The
    switch sorts packets and sends each packet only to the device it is
    intended for. Because a switch sends packets only to their destination
    devices, it can conserve network bandwidth and perform better than a
    hub. A switch may have buffers for holding and queuing packets.
    Switches work at the data link layer of the IP and OSI models (layer
    2 ).

    Some Ethernet switches have enough bandwidth to communicate
    simultaneously, in full-duplex mode, with all connected devices. Full-
    duplex Ethernet further improves things by eliminating collisions.
    Theoretically, each host on a switched network can transmit and
    receive simultaneously at speed of the network (e.g., 100 megabits per
    second) for an effective bandwidth between hosts of twice the speed of
    the network (e.g., 200 megabits per second), depending on the capacity
    of the switch.


  2. Re: hub vs switch

    annalissa wrote:
    > Hi all,
    >
    > these are the differences between hub and switch , which i have read
    > in the book, "A practical guide to Ubuntu Linux", is there any other
    > point important points which the book book has not mentioned
    >
    > Hub
    >
    > A hub (sometimes called a concentrator) is a device that connects
    > systems so they are all part of one network segment and share the
    > network bandwidth. Hubs work at the physical layer of the IP and OSI
    > models (layer 1).
    >
    > A nonswitched (hub-based) broadcast network can run in only half-
    > duplex mode.
    >
    > Switch
    >
    > A switch connects network segments. A switch inspects each data packet
    > and learns which devices are connected to which of its ports. The
    > switch sorts packets and sends each packet only to the device it is
    > intended for. Because a switch sends packets only to their destination
    > devices, it can conserve network bandwidth and perform better than a
    > hub. A switch may have buffers for holding and queuing packets.
    > Switches work at the data link layer of the IP and OSI models (layer
    > 2 ).
    >
    > Some Ethernet switches have enough bandwidth to communicate
    > simultaneously, in full-duplex mode, with all connected devices. Full-
    > duplex Ethernet further improves things by eliminating collisions.
    > Theoretically, each host on a switched network can transmit and
    > receive simultaneously at speed of the network (e.g., 100 megabits per
    > second) for an effective bandwidth between hosts of twice the speed of
    > the network (e.g., 200 megabits per second), depending on the capacity
    > of the switch.
    >



    One of the uses of a hub is bandwidth monitoring. Its very easy to
    connect computers together using a hub, and have a third computer
    monitor the transfer.

  3. Re: hub vs switch

    Carl writes:

    > One of the uses of a hub is bandwidth monitoring. Its very easy to
    > connect computers together using a hub, and have a third computer
    > monitor the transfer.


    As an alternative, you can get a switch with "port mirroring"
    capability. You can configure one of the ports to mirror all of the
    packets seen on the other ports.


    Dell makes one for just $100 (8 ports) to $400 (48 ports).

  4. Re: hub vs switch

    On Oct 3, 10:47 pm, Maxwell Lol wrote:
    > Carl writes:
    > > One of the uses of a hub is bandwidth monitoring. Its very easy to
    > > connect computers together using a hub, and have a third computer
    > > monitor the transfer.

    >
    > As an alternative, you can get a switch with "port mirroring"
    > capability. You can configure one of the ports to mirror all of the
    > packets seen on the other ports.
    >
    > Dell makes one for just $100 (8 ports) to $400 (48 ports).


    -Using any kind of switches you can monitor the traffic even if has
    not the "port mirroring" function. Using ARP spoofing. Many
    applications on both Linux and Windows will help doing so easily. You
    can also do this manually on Linux. If you want example on Windows you
    can check a program called winarpspoof . It's a free ware and will
    help you to monitor the whole network without using the "port
    mirroring" capability. But this is forbidden to do on some networks
    specially if you are not the dmin for the network. So every body
    should check first.
    Regards,

  5. Re: hub vs switch

    On Oct 3, 10:47 pm, Maxwell Lol wrote:
    > Carl writes:
    > > One of the uses of a hub is bandwidth monitoring. Its very easy to
    > > connect computers together using a hub, and have a third computer
    > > monitor the transfer.

    >
    > As an alternative, you can get a switch with "port mirroring"
    > capability. You can configure one of the ports to mirror all of the
    > packets seen on the other ports.
    >
    > Dell makes one for just $100 (8 ports) to $400 (48 ports).


    -Using any kind of switches you can monitor the traffic even if has
    not the "port mirroring" function. Using ARP spoofing. Many
    applications on both Linux and Windows will help doing so easily. You
    can also do this manually on Linux. If you want example on Windows you
    can check a program called winarpspoof . It's a free ware and will
    help you to monitor the whole network without using the "port
    mirroring" capability. But this is forbidden to do on some networks
    specially if you are not the admin for the network. So every body
    should check first.
    Regards,

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