X11 Forwarding and Windows remote desktop - Networking

This is a discussion on X11 Forwarding and Windows remote desktop - Networking ; Hey, First time posting here. I am running a server from my dorm and am planning on upgrading it to Ubuntu Hardy from xp. One of the things that I like in XP is the remote desktop feature not because ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: X11 Forwarding and Windows remote desktop

  1. X11 Forwarding and Windows remote desktop

    Hey, First time posting here. I am running a server from my dorm and am
    planning on upgrading it to Ubuntu Hardy from xp. One of the things
    that I like in XP is the remote desktop feature not because it has any
    particular feature, but because its relatively fast on the dorms upload
    connection (800 kbps max is a pain).

    I was looking into remote desktop for ubuntu and caught wind of x11
    forwarding, but I couldn't find much info on how it works. I would
    rather it not take screencaps like VLC does due to my low bandwidth
    connection. My question is approx. how much bandwidth will having a
    remote x11 session cost me in terms of bandwidth?

  2. Re: X11 Forwarding and Windows remote desktop

    On Mon, 07 Jul 2008 19:10:40 -0400, Carl Mastrangelo wrote:

    > how much bandwidth will having a
    > remote x11 session cost me in terms of bandwidth?


    It depends upon how graphic-intensive the applications you're using are.
    The more data that needs to be sent, the more bandwidth you're using.

    I'm not a heavy user of graphics over X, typically. What I find is that
    a slow connection is more problematic for me because of latency than
    bandwidth. The delay between when I do something on my local hardware
    and when the result finally appears on my screen can be annoying.

    What I prefer is to avoid X forwarding at a distance where possible. For
    example, instead of opening an editor on the server why not mount the
    server's file system over the network and edit locally? If you're doing
    X forwarding over a public network you're using SSH's X forwarding. And
    in that case, you can use sshfs to mount the server's disk space on your
    local machine.

    But where tricks like this aren't possible, I have used X forwarding over
    relatively narrow connections (like old DSL links) with only minor
    frustration (but over latency, as I mentioned previously).

    - Andrew

  3. Re: X11 Forwarding and Windows remote desktop

    Hello,

    Carl Mastrangelo wrote:

    > Hey, First time posting here. I am running a server from my dorm and am
    > planning on upgrading it to Ubuntu Hardy from xp. One of the things
    > that I like in XP is the remote desktop feature not because it has any
    > particular feature, but because its relatively fast on the dorms upload
    > connection (800 kbps max is a pain).
    >
    > I was looking into remote desktop for ubuntu and caught wind of x11
    > forwarding, but I couldn't find much info on how it works. I would
    > rather it not take screencaps like VLC does due to my low bandwidth
    > connection. My question is approx. how much bandwidth will having a
    > remote x11 session cost me in terms of bandwidth?


    To my experience, the X11 implementation in Linux is very, very slow on a
    low-bandwidth link, e.g. DSL.
    Its fairly easy to use, login on the remote machine with ssh -X remoteIP,
    and type e.g. "xterm", and after number of seconds you will get a xterm
    window (here about 50sec with 256KBit/sec uplink)


    There are several other options, but it depends whether you want to transfer
    the desktop of the remote machine or to start a new desktop.

    If you want to look to the remote desktop, you can implement a VNC module in
    the remote X-server. With "vncviewer", you can observe or manipulate the
    remote desktop.
    Not that fast, but it works. Alternative is the program x0vncserver, which
    requires no modification of the xorg.conf file.

    With "vncserver", you can start a complete new desktop on the remote machine
    and use it on your client with "vncviewer". Works fine, especially if you
    do not use the fancy KDE or GNOME desktop but restrict to e.g. the
    simple "mwm" window manager.

    A similar project is Xrdp, also based on VNC, where you can use the Windows
    remote desktop client or the Linux "rdesktop", to work on the newly created
    desktop on the remote machine. Comparable with the Windows 2003Server remote
    desktop system (but without bothering about licenses)

    Finally, there is the NoMachine NX server/client, which is highly optimized
    for this kind of application. There is somehow a commercial version and an
    opensource version, FreeNX. You can simply adapt the protocol to the line
    speed and it's really fast due to compression and local caching of
    graphics. I'm not sure whether Ubuntu offers this with their package
    manager, but that's easy to find out....

    Hope that this helps you and good luck!

    H.Janssen
    Alkmaar









  4. Re: X11 Forwarding and Windows remote desktop

    Carl Mastrangelo wrote:
    > Hey, First time posting here. I am running a server from my dorm and am
    > planning on upgrading it to Ubuntu Hardy from xp. One of the things
    > that I like in XP is the remote desktop feature not because it has any
    > particular feature, but because its relatively fast on the dorms upload
    > connection (800 kbps max is a pain).
    >
    > I was looking into remote desktop for ubuntu and caught wind of x11
    > forwarding, but I couldn't find much info on how it works. I would
    > rather it not take screencaps like VLC does due to my low bandwidth
    > connection. My question is approx. how much bandwidth will having a
    > remote x11 session cost me in terms of bandwidth?


    I use X11 forwarding a lot. It has a few advantages:
    - It forwards exactly what you want, and leaves out what you don't. You
    will NOT get the remote "desktop", but the applications instead. They
    mix in with your local applications perfectly.
    - It can be tunnelled over SSH with compression. This will not give
    "native" speed, but is fast enough. Using SSH is highly recommended.

    You can not couple your own drives as with RDP, but with sshfs you can
    just mount the remote machine or parts of it.

    But if you speak of a server, why does it run X?

    Best regards,
    --
    Willem Bogaerts

    Application smith
    Kratz B.V.
    http://www.kratz.nl/

  5. Re: X11 Forwarding and Windows remote desktop

    H.Janssen wrote:
    > If you want to look to the remote desktop, you can implement a VNC module in
    > the remote X-server. With "vncviewer", you can observe or manipulate the
    > remote desktop.


    Easiest is to log in to the remote host and simply type "vncserver".
    Observe the output to get the (VNC) screen number and then use vncviewer
    on the local host to connect to it. No changes required to remote X
    Windows server.

    Chris

  6. Re: X11 Forwarding and Windows remote desktop

    Willem Bogaerts wrote:
    > Carl Mastrangelo wrote:
    >> Hey, First time posting here. I am running a server from my dorm and
    >> am planning on upgrading it to Ubuntu Hardy from xp. One of the
    >> things that I like in XP is the remote desktop feature not because it
    >> has any particular feature, but because its relatively fast on the
    >> dorms upload connection (800 kbps max is a pain).
    >>
    >> I was looking into remote desktop for ubuntu and caught wind of x11
    >> forwarding, but I couldn't find much info on how it works. I would
    >> rather it not take screencaps like VLC does due to my low bandwidth
    >> connection. My question is approx. how much bandwidth will having a
    >> remote x11 session cost me in terms of bandwidth?

    >
    > I use X11 forwarding a lot. It has a few advantages:
    > - It forwards exactly what you want, and leaves out what you don't. You
    > will NOT get the remote "desktop", but the applications instead. They
    > mix in with your local applications perfectly.
    > - It can be tunnelled over SSH with compression. This will not give
    > "native" speed, but is fast enough. Using SSH is highly recommended.
    >
    > You can not couple your own drives as with RDP, but with sshfs you can
    > just mount the remote machine or parts of it.
    >
    > But if you speak of a server, why does it run X?
    >
    > Best regards,


    The server I have also doubles as my media center. I say server
    loosely, and only because it is on the server end of a few client/server
    programs. (Im also not confident enough to rely solely on ssh to do
    administrative tasks yet )

    I appreciate the help!

    Carl

  7. Re: X11 Forwarding and Windows remote desktop

    On Tue, 08 Jul 2008 07:34:15 -0400, Carl wrote:

    > The server I have also doubles as my media center.


    Don't tell anyone, but I just happened to confirm that my home's media
    center (MythTV) is accessible from my laptop even while at work. This
    isn't using X forwarding, but is using SSH to forward the TCP connection
    (s) used by MythTV (including both the video and MySQL).

    The key is that I'm running the client on my workstation; not forwarding
    over X. I'd recommend that as much as possible: don't run an application
    on the server that can be run on your client while accessing server
    resources. Given sshfs, even remote file access is pretty
    straightforward.

    But I want to emphasize: don't do remote X forwarding w/o SSH. Aside
    from anything else, it's likely to be more difficult to deal with any
    type of firewall between your client and server.

    - Andrew

  8. Re: X11 Forwarding and Windows remote desktop

    >> But if you speak of a server, why does it run X?
    >
    > The server I have also doubles as my media center. I say server
    > loosely, and only because it is on the server end of a few client/server
    > programs. (Im also not confident enough to rely solely on ssh to do
    > administrative tasks yet )



    OK. I have a similar situation: I have a virtual test machine at work.
    It serves to test XDMCP, as well as a build server to test deployments
    of web sites, etc. Anything I want to test really.

    The same applies to my old laptop at home. I want to turn it into a
    server (for it is quiet and small enough to be out of the away) behind
    our home network (I live in a co-housing project). This gives me the
    luxury of a safe place behind a firewall AND the possibility to learn
    how to set up a server.

    Good luck!

+ Reply to Thread