TCP packets - Networking

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  1. TCP packets

    There will be virtual connection established between server and client
    in TCP. Whether TCP packets from server to client and client to server
    follow the same route?

  2. Re: TCP packets

    Ram wrote:
    > There will be virtual connection established between server and client
    > in TCP. Whether TCP packets from server to client and client to server
    > follow the same route?


    Probably.

    Robert

  3. Re: TCP packets

    In comp.os.linux.networking, Robert Harris wrote:

    > Ram wrote:
    >> There will be virtual connection established between server and client
    >> in TCP. Whether TCP packets from server to client and client to server
    >> follow the same route?

    >
    > Probably.


    But not necessarily. That is the nature of routing with IP ("Internet
    Protocol")

    --
    Lew Pitcher

    Master Codewright & JOAT-in-training | Registered Linux User #112576
    http://pitcher.digitalfreehold.ca/ | GPG public key available by request
    ---------- Slackware - Because I know what I'm doing. ------



  4. Re: TCP packets

    Ram writes:

    > There will be virtual connection established between server and client
    > in TCP. Whether TCP packets from server to client and client to server
    > follow the same route?


    You have no guarantee, but I'd be surprised if it didn't. What
    application do you have where it would matter?

  5. Re: TCP packets

    On Jun 3, 11:40*pm, Joe Pfeiffer wrote:
    > Ram writes:
    > > There will be virtual connection established between server and client
    > > in TCP. Whether TCP packets from server to client and client to server
    > > follow the same route?

    >
    > You have no guarantee, but I'd be surprised if it didn't. *What
    > application do you have where it would matter?


    In most typical Internet scenarios, they won't. Many large Internet
    providers use a routing strategy that is very similar to nearest exit.
    This means when they receive a packet that is destined for another
    provider, they hand it to that provider at the closest such handover
    point.

    So consider a situation where two computers have different providers
    and there's a long haul involved (like across an ocean). If both
    carriers meet on both sides of the long haul, the carrier that is
    receiving the packet will typically wind up carrying the packet on the
    long haul.

    How else do you think you'd get a fair split if you have Cogent on the
    West coast and I have Sprint on the East?

    Or consider this: You have FooNet and I have NetFoo. FooNet has 1Gbps
    Cogent and 45Mbps to Sprint, they prefer Sprint strongly for outbound
    traffic. NetFoo has 1Gbps to Sprint and 100Mbps to Cogent; they prefer
    Cogent strongly for outbound traffic. You think our packets round-
    trips are likely to be symmetric?

    DS

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