Getting a router to name-serve DHCP clients. - Networking

This is a discussion on Getting a router to name-serve DHCP clients. - Networking ; Hi, I'm no expert in this stuff so I hope this isn't a stupid question. I've Googled extensively but cannot find an answer. I have a U.S. Robotics Wireless MAXg ADSL Gateway router. It is set up to act as ...

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Thread: Getting a router to name-serve DHCP clients.

  1. Getting a router to name-serve DHCP clients.

    Hi,

    I'm no expert in this stuff so I hope this isn't a stupid question. I've
    Googled extensively but cannot find an answer.

    I have a U.S. Robotics Wireless MAXg ADSL Gateway router. It is set up
    to act as a DHCP server. I have a linux box, hostname badger, set up to
    be a DHCP client.

    Using another linux box, I cannot resolve the name badger. For example,
    "dig +short @192.168.1.1 badger" returns nothing. (Where 192.168.1.1 is
    the address of the router.)

    What do I need to do to get this to work?

    Thanks,
    DonnySP

  2. Re: Getting a router to name-serve DHCP clients.

    DonnySP wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I'm no expert in this stuff so I hope this isn't a stupid question. I've
    > Googled extensively but cannot find an answer.
    >
    > I have a U.S. Robotics Wireless MAXg ADSL Gateway router. It is set up
    > to act as a DHCP server. I have a linux box, hostname badger, set up to
    > be a DHCP client.
    >
    > Using another linux box, I cannot resolve the name badger. For example,
    > "dig +short @192.168.1.1 badger" returns nothing. (Where 192.168.1.1 is
    > the address of the router.)
    >
    > What do I need to do to get this to work?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > DonnySP


    You could try adding a "send host-name badger" to your dhcp client
    configuration file, which on my (Debian) system is
    /etc/dhcp3/dhclient.conf assuming that you are using the ISC dhcp client.

    Or perhaps the nameserver on the router just cannot resolve it ;-(

    Robert


  3. Re: Getting a router to name-serve DHCP clients.

    Robert Harris wrote:
    > DonnySP wrote:
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> I'm no expert in this stuff so I hope this isn't a stupid question. I've
    >> Googled extensively but cannot find an answer.
    >>
    >> I have a U.S. Robotics Wireless MAXg ADSL Gateway router. It is set up
    >> to act as a DHCP server. I have a linux box, hostname badger, set up to
    >> be a DHCP client.
    >>
    >> Using another linux box, I cannot resolve the name badger. For example,
    >> "dig +short @192.168.1.1 badger" returns nothing. (Where 192.168.1.1 is
    >> the address of the router.)
    >>
    >> What do I need to do to get this to work?
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >> DonnySP

    >
    > You could try adding a "send host-name badger" to your dhcp client
    > configuration file, which on my (Debian) system is
    > /etc/dhcp3/dhclient.conf assuming that you are using the ISC dhcp client.
    >
    > Or perhaps the nameserver on the router just cannot resolve it ;-(
    >
    > Robert
    >


    Thanks for the suggestion. Unfortunately it didn't help. I have
    contacted the router manufacturer, but in the meantime, any more ideas guys?

    Donny

  4. Re: Getting a router to name-serve DHCP clients.

    DonnySP wrote:
    > Robert Harris wrote:
    >> DonnySP wrote:
    >>> Hi,
    >>>
    >>> I'm no expert in this stuff so I hope this isn't a stupid question. I've
    >>> Googled extensively but cannot find an answer.
    >>>
    >>> I have a U.S. Robotics Wireless MAXg ADSL Gateway router. It is set up
    >>> to act as a DHCP server. I have a linux box, hostname badger, set up to
    >>> be a DHCP client.
    >>>
    >>> Using another linux box, I cannot resolve the name badger. For example,
    >>> "dig +short @192.168.1.1 badger" returns nothing. (Where 192.168.1.1 is
    >>> the address of the router.)
    >>>
    >>> What do I need to do to get this to work?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks,
    >>> DonnySP

    >>
    >> You could try adding a "send host-name badger" to your dhcp client
    >> configuration file, which on my (Debian) system is
    >> /etc/dhcp3/dhclient.conf assuming that you are using the ISC dhcp client.
    >>
    >> Or perhaps the nameserver on the router just cannot resolve it ;-(
    >>
    >> Robert
    >>

    >
    > Thanks for the suggestion. Unfortunately it didn't help. I have
    > contacted the router manufacturer, but in the meantime, any more ideas
    > guys?
    >
    > Donny


    You could run DHCP and DNS on one of your Linux boxes instead of on the
    router. The program "dnsmasq" does both of them well.

    Robert

  5. Re: Getting a router to name-serve DHCP clients.

    DonnySP wrote:

    > Robert Harris wrote:
    >> DonnySP wrote:
    >>> Hi,
    >>>
    >>> I'm no expert in this stuff so I hope this isn't a stupid question. I've
    >>> Googled extensively but cannot find an answer.
    >>>
    >>> I have a U.S. Robotics Wireless MAXg ADSL Gateway router. It is set up
    >>> to act as a DHCP server. I have a linux box, hostname badger, set up to
    >>> be a DHCP client.
    >>>
    >>> Using another linux box, I cannot resolve the name badger. For example,
    >>> "dig +short @192.168.1.1 badger" returns nothing. (Where 192.168.1.1 is
    >>> the address of the router.)
    >>>
    >>> What do I need to do to get this to work?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks,
    >>> DonnySP

    >>
    >> You could try adding a "send host-name badger" to your dhcp client
    >> configuration file, which on my (Debian) system is
    >> /etc/dhcp3/dhclient.conf assuming that you are using the ISC dhcp client.
    >>
    >> Or perhaps the nameserver on the router just cannot resolve it ;-(
    >>
    >> Robert
    >>

    >
    > Thanks for the suggestion. Unfortunately it didn't help. I have
    > contacted the router manufacturer, but in the meantime, any more ideas
    > guys?
    >
    > Donny


    Does your router support "static DHCP" ... which assigns the same ip
    address to a given mac address? My router does, and I do name resolution
    by having ip's/hostnames listed in /etc/hosts on each machine. For example,
    if badger's ip is 192.168.0.10 and bullfrog is 192.168.0.11, then this goes
    in /etc/hosts on every box:

    192.168.0.10 badger
    192.168.0.11 bullfrog
    .... etc

    My eleven node lan (which includes windows boxen) has been working this
    way for a long time. I prefer it to assigning DHCP to a certain machine
    because there's no one that is always running.

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