Problem with Debian Etch and NTP - Networking

This is a discussion on Problem with Debian Etch and NTP - Networking ; I have installed Debian 4.0 Etch r3 i386 in my laptop and I have a strange problem with clock setting with NTP that I can't solve by my self. I use NTP to sync clock, and I think NTP configuration ...

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Thread: Problem with Debian Etch and NTP

  1. Problem with Debian Etch and NTP

    I have installed Debian 4.0 Etch r3 i386 in my laptop and I have a
    strange problem with clock setting with NTP that I can't solve by my self.

    I use NTP to sync clock, and I think NTP configuration is well done,
    even time zones too.

    When I boot my laptop, my clock is always +2 hour over my current time.
    My ntpd is running, but when I type ntpq -p I get "No association ID's
    returned" message.

    So I restart ntpd and after a while I get my clock synchronized again,
    so I understand that my configuration is OK, but I can't understand why
    it does not work at boot time and it does after restart daemon manually.

    By the way, after this, I can type ntpq -q and now I get the list of NTP
    servers I have configured and its running data.

    I will apreciate any help with this problem. If you need some of my
    configuration files or any other info, please ask for them.

    Many thanks.

  2. Re: Problem with Debian Etch and NTP

    On Sat, 05 Apr 2008 13:03:00 +0200, ├Çngel Catal├* wrote:

    > I use NTP to sync clock, and I think NTP configuration is well done,
    > even time zones too.


    NTP has nothing to do with time zones; it is always UTC.

    > When I boot my laptop, my clock is always +2 hour over my current time.
    > My ntpd is running, but when I type ntpq -p I get "No association ID's
    > returned" message.


    If your CMOS clock is set to CET, which it would be for your locale and
    you have chosen UTC as your local time then that is expected.

    Copy /usr/share/zoneinfo/Europe/Madrid to /etc/localtime and see if that
    helps.

  3. Re: Problem with Debian Etch and NTP

    > So I restart ntpd and after a while I get my clock synchronized again,
    > so I understand that my configuration is OK, but I can't understand why
    > it does not work at boot time and it does after restart daemon manually.


    Perhaps ntpd is launching before the network is up. I've had similar
    problems with udev running too early if you disable other things like
    dbus, autofs, and the likes. Adjust the /etc/rc?.d/S## for ntpd and see
    if that helps. Higher numbers run later in the boot sequence.

    There's other things for timezone / date stuff as well. So maybe that's
    not quite right either. tzconfig, locales, /etc/timezone, /etc/localtime,
    and various other things that need setting up as well. Is the computer
    clock set to UTC or localtime? Are you rebooting to windows and it's
    adjusting for DST without syncing to a server? Even though you already
    adjusted for DST in linux.

    I had a similar problem once. Although I didn't sync or run ntpd at all.
    But every time my computer crashed, or otherwise shutdown without the use
    of shutdown(power outage), the clock got bumped four hours. Perhaps your
    computer is not shutting down right. All assumptions though as it's not
    my computer and I don't know how you have things setup, or not.

  4. Re: Problem with Debian Etch and NTP

    Dave Uhring escribi├│:
    > On Sat, 05 Apr 2008 13:03:00 +0200, ├Çngel Catal├* wrote:
    >
    >> I use NTP to sync clock, and I think NTP configuration is well done,
    >> even time zones too.

    >
    > NTP has nothing to do with time zones; it is always UTC.
    >
    >> When I boot my laptop, my clock is always +2 hour over my current time.
    >> My ntpd is running, but when I type ntpq -p I get "No association ID's
    >> returned" message.

    >
    > If your CMOS clock is set to CET, which it would be for your locale and
    > you have chosen UTC as your local time then that is expected.
    >
    > Copy /usr/share/zoneinfo/Europe/Madrid to /etc/localtime and see if that
    > helps.


    Hi Dave,

    I have tryed copying that file to /etc/localtime, but it still is wrong.

    In /etc/default/rcS, I have UTC=no (by default). In "Debian GNU/Linux
    System Administrator's Manual. Chapter 16 - Time" it can be read: "To
    change the computer to use UTC after installation, edit the file
    /etc/default/rcS, change the variable UTC to no". I thought if you
    wanted use UTC you should set the variable UTC to yes, but it seems on
    the other hand.

    Thanks for your answer.

  5. Re: Problem with Debian Etch and NTP

    Shadow_7 escribi├│:
    >> So I restart ntpd and after a while I get my clock synchronized again,
    >> so I understand that my configuration is OK, but I can't understand why
    >> it does not work at boot time and it does after restart daemon manually.

    >
    > Perhaps ntpd is launching before the network is up. I've had similar
    > problems with udev running too early if you disable other things like
    > dbus, autofs, and the likes. Adjust the /etc/rc?.d/S## for ntpd and see
    > if that helps. Higher numbers run later in the boot sequence.
    >
    > There's other things for timezone / date stuff as well. So maybe that's
    > not quite right either. tzconfig, locales, /etc/timezone, /etc/localtime,
    > and various other things that need setting up as well. Is the computer
    > clock set to UTC or localtime? Are you rebooting to windows and it's
    > adjusting for DST without syncing to a server? Even though you already
    > adjusted for DST in linux.
    >
    > I had a similar problem once. Although I didn't sync or run ntpd at all.
    > But every time my computer crashed, or otherwise shutdown without the use
    > of shutdown(power outage), the clock got bumped four hours. Perhaps your
    > computer is not shutting down right. All assumptions though as it's not
    > my computer and I don't know how you have things setup, or not.


    Hi,

    In /etc/default/rcS, I have UTC=no (by default). In "Debian GNU/Linux
    System Administrator's Manual. Chapter 16 - Time" it can be read: "To
    change the computer to use UTC after installation, edit the file
    /etc/default/rcS, change the variable UTC to no". I thought if you
    wanted use UTC you should set the variable UTC to yes, but it seems on
    the other hand.

    When I boot my laptop in Windows, the clock is OK, but when I boot with
    Linux, I get this problem.

    My runlevel is 2, so I look at rc2.d. In rc2.d I have S23ntp and after
    that: S25bluetooth, S89anacron, S89atd, S89cron, S99acpi-support,
    S99rc.local, etc. So ntp is starting quite late in my boot sequence.

    Thanks for your answer.

  6. Re: Problem with Debian Etch and NTP

    On Mon, 07 Apr 2008 08:46:10 +0200, ├Çngel Catal├* wrote:
    > Dave Uhring escribi├│:


    >> If your CMOS clock is set to CET, which it would be for your locale and
    >> you have chosen UTC as your local time then that is expected.
    >>
    >> Copy /usr/share/zoneinfo/Europe/Madrid to /etc/localtime and see if
    >> that helps.


    > I have tryed copying that file to /etc/localtime, but it still is wrong.


    What is the content of /etc/timezone? Valencia has the same time as
    Madrid, no? Then /etc/timezone should have

    Europe/Madrid

    > In /etc/default/rcS, I have UTC=no (by default). In "Debian GNU/Linux
    > System Administrator's Manual. Chapter 16 - Time" it can be read: "To
    > change the computer to use UTC after installation, edit the file
    > /etc/default/rcS, change the variable UTC to no". I thought if you
    > wanted use UTC you should set the variable UTC to yes, but it seems on
    > the other hand.


    Then the manual is in error. Read the man page rcS(5).

    Since you stated that Windows keeps correct time then your CMOS clock is
    set to localtime, not UTC, and /etc/default/rcS *should* read UTC=no.


  7. Re: Problem with Debian Etch and NTP

    Hi Dave,

    >>> If your CMOS clock is set to CET, which it would be for your locale and
    >>> you have chosen UTC as your local time then that is expected.
    >>>
    >>> Copy /usr/share/zoneinfo/Europe/Madrid to /etc/localtime and see if
    >>> that helps.

    >
    >> I have tryed copying that file to /etc/localtime, but it still is wrong.

    >
    > What is the content of /etc/timezone? Valencia has the same time as
    > Madrid, no? Then /etc/timezone should have
    >
    > Europe/Madrid



    That's right, Valencia has the same time zone as Madrid and my
    /etc/timezone is "Europe/Madrid"

    >> In /etc/default/rcS, I have UTC=no (by default). In "Debian GNU/Linux
    >> System Administrator's Manual. Chapter 16 - Time" it can be read: "To
    >> change the computer to use UTC after installation, edit the file
    >> /etc/default/rcS, change the variable UTC to no". I thought if you
    >> wanted use UTC you should set the variable UTC to yes, but it seems on
    >> the other hand.

    >
    > Then the manual is in error. Read the man page rcS(5).
    >
    > Since you stated that Windows keeps correct time then your CMOS clock is
    > set to localtime, not UTC, and /etc/default/rcS *should* read UTC=no.
    >


    It does not seems a configuration problem because, when a restart my ntp
    service, after boot, in a minute or a couple of minutes I get the right
    time. It seems a problem with ntp starting. At boot time, ntp starts (I
    can see ntpd process with ps), but it seems it is not working as it
    should be (when I type ntpq -q, it answers me theres is no association IDs).

    Thanks.


  8. Re: Problem with Debian Etch and NTP

    On Tue, 08 Apr 2008 09:33:43 +0200, ├Çngel Catal├* wrote:

    > It does not seems a configuration problem because, when a restart my ntp
    > service, after boot, in a minute or a couple of minutes I get the right
    > time. It seems a problem with ntp starting. At boot time, ntp starts (I
    > can see ntpd process with ps), but it seems it is not working as it
    > should be (when I type ntpq -q, it answers me theres is no association
    > IDs).


    Then perhaps you should hack your /etc/init.d/ntp script to run ntpdate
    prior to starting the daemon.

    But "ntpq -q", really? How about "ntpq -p"?

  9. Re: Problem with Debian Etch and NTP

    Dave Uhring escribi├│:
    > On Tue, 08 Apr 2008 09:33:43 +0200, ├Çngel Catal├* wrote:
    >
    >> It does not seems a configuration problem because, when a restart my ntp
    >> service, after boot, in a minute or a couple of minutes I get the right
    >> time. It seems a problem with ntp starting. At boot time, ntp starts (I
    >> can see ntpd process with ps), but it seems it is not working as it
    >> should be (when I type ntpq -q, it answers me theres is no association
    >> IDs).

    >
    > Then perhaps you should hack your /etc/init.d/ntp script to run ntpdate
    > prior to starting the daemon.
    >
    > But "ntpq -q", really? How about "ntpq -p"?


    Hehe, yes "ntpq -p" better :-))). It was just a typo.

    I will try run ntpdate in /etc/init.d/ntp script

    I will tell you the end of the story.

    Thanks.

  10. Re: Problem with Debian Etch and NTP

    ├Çngel Catal├* wrote:
    > I have installed Debian 4.0 Etch r3 i386 in my laptop and I have a
    > strange problem with clock setting with NTP that I can't solve by my self.


    What kind of laptop?


    > When I boot my laptop, my clock is always +2 hour over my current time.


    I had a similar problem with my DELL, which was nothing to do with ntp
    (other than it refusing to run because the time was so far off) and
    the solution turned out to be to add "HWCLOCKPARS=--directisa" to the
    /etc/default/rcS file.

    You can confirm whether you need this fix by trying this command
    (as root):

    hwclock --show

    If you get the message, "select() to /dev/rtc to wait for clock tick
    timed out" try it again:

    hwclock --show --directisa

    If this works for you (returning within a second with a time) then you
    need the fix.

    Chris


  11. Re: Problem with Debian Etch and NTP

    Dave Uhring escribi├│:
    > On Tue, 08 Apr 2008 09:33:43 +0200, ├Çngel Catal├* wrote:
    >
    >> It does not seems a configuration problem because, when a restart my ntp
    >> service, after boot, in a minute or a couple of minutes I get the right
    >> time. It seems a problem with ntp starting. At boot time, ntp starts (I
    >> can see ntpd process with ps), but it seems it is not working as it
    >> should be (when I type ntpq -q, it answers me theres is no association
    >> IDs).

    >
    > Then perhaps you should hack your /etc/init.d/ntp script to run ntpdate
    > prior to starting the daemon.
    >
    > But "ntpq -q", really? How about "ntpq -p"?


    Hi again,

    I have tryed calling ntpdate (with time servers I have configured in
    ntp.conf) prior to start ntpd in /etc/init.d/ntp (and a "sleep 2"
    command between both calls) and it still fails.

    This is really a great mistery to me !!!!. I have never had problems
    with NTP.

    Currently I have Debian 4.0 'Etch' r3 i386 installed, but a month ago I
    had Debian 4.0 'Etch' r0 x64 and it worked fine. It is driving me crazy.

    Bye.

  12. Re: Problem with Debian Etch and NTP

    On Tue, 08 Apr 2008 19:09:23 +0200, ├Çngel Catal├* wrote:
    > Dave Uhring escribi├│:


    >> Then perhaps you should hack your /etc/init.d/ntp script to run ntpdate
    >> prior to starting the daemon.


    > I have tryed calling ntpdate (with time servers I have configured in
    > ntp.conf) prior to start ntpd in /etc/init.d/ntp (and a "sleep 2"
    > command between both calls) and it still fails.


    Stop ntpd, /etc/init.d/ntp stop

    Run ntpdate your_NTP_server just once, then 'date'. Does the correct
    time appear?

    > Currently I have Debian 4.0 'Etch' r3 i386 installed, but a month ago I
    > had Debian 4.0 'Etch' r0 x64 and it worked fine. It is driving me crazy.


    I upgrade from Etch r1 to Lenny as soon as I do the installation. Never
    once had a problem with NTP. I even run a local NTP server on my network
    and *it* is running Lenny and synced to one closest stratum 2 server plus
    two of the servers in the debian.pool.

    The other systems on the net are Solaris -several versions- , OpenBSD,
    FreeBSD, Slackware and Debian Lenny. All sync to the local NTP server
    and all keep the correct time.


  13. Re: Problem with Debian Etch and NTP

    Hi, Chris:

    Chris Davies escribi├│:
    > ├Çngel Catal├* wrote:
    >> I have installed Debian 4.0 Etch r3 i386 in my laptop and I have a
    >> strange problem with clock setting with NTP that I can't solve by my self.

    >
    > What kind of laptop?
    >


    My laptop is a HP Compaq nw8440. A month ago, this laptop, was running
    Debian 4.0 r0 x64 and time worked fine. Now is running Debian 4.0 r3
    i386 and time is not working properly.


    >> When I boot my laptop, my clock is always +2 hour over my current time.

    >
    > I had a similar problem with my DELL, which was nothing to do with ntp
    > (other than it refusing to run because the time was so far off) and
    > the solution turned out to be to add "HWCLOCKPARS=--directisa" to the
    > /etc/default/rcS file.
    >
    > You can confirm whether you need this fix by trying this command
    > (as root):
    >
    > hwclock --show
    >
    > If you get the message, "select() to /dev/rtc to wait for clock tick
    > timed out" try it again:
    >
    > hwclock --show --directisa
    >
    > If this works for you (returning within a second with a time) then you
    > need the fix.
    >
    > Chris
    >


    I have tryed what you said, and when I typed "hwclock --show" I have got
    that message, and for "hwclock --show --directisa" it has worked, so I
    hacked /etc/default/rcS, but it still is failing.

    Thanks Chris.

  14. Re: Problem with Debian Etch and NTP

    Dave Uhring escribi├│:
    > On Tue, 08 Apr 2008 19:09:23 +0200, ├Çngel Catal├* wrote:
    >> Dave Uhring escribi├│:

    >
    >>> Then perhaps you should hack your /etc/init.d/ntp script to run ntpdate
    >>> prior to starting the daemon.

    >
    >> I have tryed calling ntpdate (with time servers I have configured in
    >> ntp.conf) prior to start ntpd in /etc/init.d/ntp (and a "sleep 2"
    >> command between both calls) and it still fails.

    >
    > Stop ntpd, /etc/init.d/ntp stop
    >
    > Run ntpdate your_NTP_server just once, then 'date'. Does the correct
    > time appear?


    Yes, it works fine. I stop ntp daemon, then I call ntpdate with my NTP
    server and "date" answers me with the right time (also clock is set
    properly). So I think that configuration parameters are OK, but I can
    not understand what is failing.

    By the way, everytime time is set properly (with manual restarting ntp
    daemon or by typing ntpdate), my screen becomes black with a big "X"
    symbol inside. I don't know if this detail is important.

    >
    >> Currently I have Debian 4.0 'Etch' r3 i386 installed, but a month ago I
    >> had Debian 4.0 'Etch' r0 x64 and it worked fine. It is driving me crazy.

    >
    > I upgrade from Etch r1 to Lenny as soon as I do the installation. Never
    > once had a problem with NTP. I even run a local NTP server on my network
    > and *it* is running Lenny and synced to one closest stratum 2 server plus
    > two of the servers in the debian.pool.
    >
    > The other systems on the net are Solaris -several versions- , OpenBSD,
    > FreeBSD, Slackware and Debian Lenny. All sync to the local NTP server
    > and all keep the correct time.
    >


    Thanks again.

  15. Re: Problem with Debian Etch and NTP

    On Wed, 09 Apr 2008 09:15:16 +0200, └ngel CatalÓ wrote:
    > Dave Uhring escribiˇ:


    >> Stop ntpd, /etc/init.d/ntp stop
    >>
    >> Run ntpdate your_NTP_server just once, then 'date'. Does the correct
    >> time appear?

    >
    > Yes, it works fine. I stop ntp daemon, then I call ntpdate with my NTP
    > server and "date" answers me with the right time (also clock is set
    > properly). So I think that configuration parameters are OK, but I can
    > not understand what is failing.


    Then hack that very ntpdate command into /etc/init.d/ntp. Be sure to put
    the ntpdate command in the right place,

    start)
    log_daemon_msg "Starting NTP server" "ntpd"
    if [ -z "$UGID" ]; then
    log_failure_msg "user \"$RUNASUSER\".....
    exit 1
    fi
    right here ===> /usr/sbin/ntpdate your_NTP_server
    start-stop-daemon --start --quiet --oknodo....

    It's silly to run 2 consecutive invocations of ntpdate since the intent
    is to get your system time "close" to accurate before starting ntpd.

    > By the way, everytime time is set properly (with manual restarting ntp
    > daemon or by typing ntpdate), my screen becomes black with a big "X"
    > symbol inside. I don't know if this detail is important.


    That only shows that your screensaver works.


  16. Re: Problem with Debian Etch and NTP

    ├Çngel Catal├* wrote:
    > I have tryed what you said, and when I typed "hwclock --show" I have got
    > that message, and for "hwclock --show --directisa" it has worked, so I
    > hacked /etc/default/rcS, but it still is failing.


    This is the underlying problem. Your OS can't read or set the clock
    correctly, so it can't correct for the two hours.

    All the NTP suggestions are quite likely just side issues, sadly, and for
    now I would strongly suggest you first address the underlying problem.
    Once that's done, NTP should just start working as you'd expect.


    To get the boot time sorted, you need to fiddle around with the hwclock
    command. My assumptions are (a) that you're two hours ahead of UTC, and
    (b) that your BIOS clock is running under local time rather than UTC.

    1. Boot debian and set the time (using ntpdate, or whatever you prefer)
    to within a couple of second or so of "real" time.

    2. Write the current date/time to the BIOS clock:

    hwclock --directisa --localtime --systohc --noadjfile

    3. Remove the adjtime file, to reset any wild (and invalid) adjustment
    attempts the system may have made:

    rm -f /etc/adjtime

    4. Write the current date/tiem to the BIOS clock again, this time
    updating/creating the adjustment file:

    hwclock --directisa --localtime --systohc

    5. Verify the current date/time in the BIOS clock. This should show the
    correct current time (to within a few seconds):

    hwclock --directisa --show

    If this doesn't show the right time, repeat from #3 again but
    with --utc instead of --localtime for item #4

    6. Reboot without updating the BIOS clock again:

    reboot -f


    That should work :-)
    Chris

  17. Re: Problem with Debian Etch and NTP

    Chris Davies escribi├│:
    > ├Çngel Catal├* wrote:
    >> I have tryed what you said, and when I typed "hwclock --show" I have got
    >> that message, and for "hwclock --show --directisa" it has worked, so I
    >> hacked /etc/default/rcS, but it still is failing.

    >
    > This is the underlying problem. Your OS can't read or set the clock
    > correctly, so it can't correct for the two hours.
    >
    > All the NTP suggestions are quite likely just side issues, sadly, and for
    > now I would strongly suggest you first address the underlying problem.
    > Once that's done, NTP should just start working as you'd expect.
    >
    >
    > To get the boot time sorted, you need to fiddle around with the hwclock
    > command. My assumptions are (a) that you're two hours ahead of UTC, and
    > (b) that your BIOS clock is running under local time rather than UTC.
    >
    > 1. Boot debian and set the time (using ntpdate, or whatever you prefer)
    > to within a couple of second or so of "real" time.
    >
    > 2. Write the current date/time to the BIOS clock:
    >
    > hwclock --directisa --localtime --systohc --noadjfile
    >
    > 3. Remove the adjtime file, to reset any wild (and invalid) adjustment
    > attempts the system may have made:
    >
    > rm -f /etc/adjtime
    >
    > 4. Write the current date/tiem to the BIOS clock again, this time
    > updating/creating the adjustment file:
    >
    > hwclock --directisa --localtime --systohc
    >
    > 5. Verify the current date/time in the BIOS clock. This should show the
    > correct current time (to within a few seconds):
    >
    > hwclock --directisa --show
    >
    > If this doesn't show the right time, repeat from #3 again but
    > with --utc instead of --localtime for item #4
    >
    > 6. Reboot without updating the BIOS clock again:
    >
    > reboot -f
    >
    >
    > That should work :-)
    > Chris


    I have tried it with --utc instead --localtime and /etc/default/rcS with
    UTC=yes

    It seems it works, but... I have always 2 hour of difference between
    Windows and Linux. If I have Linux with the right time, then Windows is
    2 hour behind. If I adjust Windows then Linux is 2 hour in advance.

    I will spend a bit time with this issue later.

    Thanks.

  18. Re: Problem with Debian Etch and NTP

    ├Çngel Catal├* wrote:
    > I have tried it with --utc instead --localtime and /etc/default/rcS with
    > UTC=yes


    That's wrong. You DEFINITELY need UTC=no because your BIOS clock is set
    by Windows to local time.

    > It seems it works, but... I have always 2 hour of difference between
    > Windows and Linux.


    Then it's not working!

    With the BIOS clock having been set to the correct time by Windows,
    can you then tell us the output of these at Linux boot time, please:

    date
    date -u
    hwclock --directisa --show --noadjtime --localtime
    hwclock --directisa --show --noadjtime --utc

    Thanks,
    Chris

  19. Re: Problem with Debian Etch and NTP

    Chris Davies escribi├│:
    > ├Çngel Catal├* wrote:
    >> I have tried it with --utc instead --localtime and /etc/default/rcS with
    >> UTC=yes

    >


    OK, I will change UTC to "no"


    > That's wrong. You DEFINITELY need UTC=no because your BIOS clock is set
    > by Windows to local time.
    >
    >> It seems it works, but... I have always 2 hour of difference between
    >> Windows and Linux.

    >
    > Then it's not working!
    >
    > With the BIOS clock having been set to the correct time by Windows,
    > can you then tell us the output of these at Linux boot time, please:
    >
    > date
    > date -u
    > hwclock --directisa --show --noadjtime --localtime
    > hwclock --directisa --show --noadjtime --utc
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Chris


    Hi, Chris

    before changing UTC to "no" in /etc/default/rcS, these are the outputs
    you have requested:

    (By the way, I guess "--noadjtime" is just a typo and it should be
    "--noadjfile")

    date
    thu apr 10 10.50:32 CEST 2008

    date -u
    thu apr 10 8:50:34 UTC 2008

    hwclock --directisa --show --noadjfile --localtime
    thu apr 10 8:50:40 CEST -0.801098 seconds

    hwclock --directisa --show --noadjfile --utc
    thu apr 10 10:50:44 CEST -0.445415 seconds


    Best regards.
    Àngel.

  20. Re: Problem with Debian Etch and NTP


    > Hi, Chris
    >
    > before changing UTC to "no" in /etc/default/rcS, these are the outputs
    > you have requested:
    >
    > (By the way, I guess "--noadjtime" is just a typo and it should be
    > "--noadjfile")
    >
    > date
    > thu apr 10 10.50:32 CEST 2008
    >
    > date -u
    > thu apr 10 8:50:34 UTC 2008
    >
    > hwclock --directisa --show --noadjfile --localtime
    > thu apr 10 8:50:40 CEST -0.801098 seconds
    >
    > hwclock --directisa --show --noadjfile --utc
    > thu apr 10 10:50:44 CEST -0.445415 seconds
    >
    >
    > Best regards.
    > Àngel.


    I have changed /etc/default/rcS in this way:

    1. Changed UTC=no
    2. Added HWCLOCKPARS=--directisa

    Then I have rebooted the laptop, and then on a shell I have typed the
    command you listed me. These are the outcomes:

    date:
    thu apr 10 11:19:46 CEST 2008

    date -u:
    thu apr 10 09:19:49 UTC 2008

    hwclock --directisa --show --noadjfile --localtime
    thu 10 apr 2008 11:20:09 CEST -0.373740 seconds

    hwclock --directisa --show --noadjfile --utc
    thu 10 apr 2008 13:20:13 CEST -0.289772 seconds

    Best regards.
    Àngel.

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