UTP vs S/UTP-FTP cables - Networking

This is a discussion on UTP vs S/UTP-FTP cables - Networking ; Hi, I have set up a local network in my home, and I have read that when using UTP CAT5 cables, we have to use a Switch, while when using FTP CAT5 cables, we can connect devices directly without a ...

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Thread: UTP vs S/UTP-FTP cables

  1. UTP vs S/UTP-FTP cables

    Hi, I have set up a local network in my home, and I have read that when
    using UTP CAT5 cables, we have to use a Switch, while when using FTP
    CAT5 cables, we can connect devices directly without a Switch.

    However I have read cases of people who used UTP cables to connect
    devices directly without a Switch. What is the proper thing for both
    cases, direct connection and use of a Switch.

  2. Re: UTP vs S/UTP-FTP cables

    john wrote:
    > Hi, I have set up a local network in my home, and I have read that when
    > using UTP CAT5 cables, we have to use a Switch, while when using FTP
    > CAT5 cables, we can connect devices directly without a Switch.
    >
    > However I have read cases of people who used UTP cables to connect
    > devices directly without a Switch. What is the proper thing for both
    > cases, direct connection and use of a Switch.


    The type of cable used has no impact on the kind of connections you can
    make with them.

    Whoever told you this was either confused or much more specific than you
    remember.

    In order of signal/noise ratio:

    UTP = Unshielded Twisted Pair
    STP = Shielded Twisted Pair
    FTP = Foiled Twisted Pair

    That said, it is common practice to use FTP or STP for horizontal and/or
    vertical interconnects (between wiring closets and from wiring closets
    to patch outlets), and UTP for device connections or patch cables.

    For Ethernet, the maximum length of one segment for each is 90~100 meters.

    As you can see from the above, for your home network UTP is more than
    sufficient.

    To connect two devices directly to one another you need a differently
    *wired* cable, called a _crosscable_; the type of wiring, however, is
    irrelevant.

    J.

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