How to tell if my card is gigabit or not - Networking

This is a discussion on How to tell if my card is gigabit or not - Networking ; I decided to undertake, slowly, a project to upgrade my home network to gigabit speed. Starting with the main switch, I want to buy a 16 port gigabit speed switch. I have a basement server computer with nVidia's CK804 chipset ...

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Thread: How to tell if my card is gigabit or not

  1. How to tell if my card is gigabit or not

    I decided to undertake, slowly, a project to upgrade my home network
    to gigabit speed. Starting with the main switch, I want to buy a 16
    port gigabit speed switch.

    I have a basement server computer with nVidia's CK804 chipset and
    network built into the mobo.

    My question is how to tell if this thing supports gigabit ethernet, or
    not? At the moment I have no other gigabit speed devices. thanks

    i

  2. Re: How to tell if my card is gigabit or not

    Ignoramus3635 wrote:
    > I decided to undertake, slowly, a project to upgrade my home network
    > to gigabit speed. Starting with the main switch, I want to buy a 16
    > port gigabit speed switch.
    >
    > I have a basement server computer with nVidia's CK804 chipset and
    > network built into the mobo.
    >
    > My question is how to tell if this thing supports gigabit ethernet, or
    > not? At the moment I have no other gigabit speed devices. thanks
    >
    > i


    "lspci" will tell you what sort of Network Controller is on your board.

    Robert

  3. Re: How to tell if my card is gigabit or not

    On Tue, 04 Sep 2007 14:38:14 GMT, Robert Harris wrote:
    > Ignoramus3635 wrote:
    >> I decided to undertake, slowly, a project to upgrade my home network
    >> to gigabit speed. Starting with the main switch, I want to buy a 16
    >> port gigabit speed switch.
    >>
    >> I have a basement server computer with nVidia's CK804 chipset and
    >> network built into the mobo.
    >>
    >> My question is how to tell if this thing supports gigabit ethernet, or
    >> not? At the moment I have no other gigabit speed devices. thanks
    >>
    >> i

    >
    > "lspci" will tell you what sort of Network Controller is on your board.
    >


    That's exactly what it said:

    root:~ ###lspci|grep Ethernet
    00:0a.0 Bridge: nVidia Corporation CK804 Ethernet Controller (rev a3)


  4. Re: How to tell if my card is gigabit or not

    On Tue, 04 Sep 2007 07:24:48 -0500, Ignoramus3635 wrote:

    > I decided to undertake, slowly, a project to upgrade my home network
    > to gigabit speed. Starting with the main switch, I want to buy a 16
    > port gigabit speed switch.
    >
    > I have a basement server computer with nVidia's CK804 chipset and
    > network built into the mobo.
    >
    > My question is how to tell if this thing supports gigabit ethernet, or
    > not? At the moment I have no other gigabit speed devices. thanks
    >
    > i
    >

    Perhaps, one of these will give the details.
    # ethtool eth0
    # mii-tool eth0

    The network card in my system gives the details you are looking for using
    ethtool.

    --
    Douglas Mayne


  5. Re: How to tell if my card is gigabit or not

    On Tue, 04 Sep 2007 09:30:23 -0600, Douglas Mayne wrote:
    > On Tue, 04 Sep 2007 07:24:48 -0500, Ignoramus3635 wrote:
    >
    >> I decided to undertake, slowly, a project to upgrade my home network
    >> to gigabit speed. Starting with the main switch, I want to buy a 16
    >> port gigabit speed switch.
    >>
    >> I have a basement server computer with nVidia's CK804 chipset and
    >> network built into the mobo.
    >>
    >> My question is how to tell if this thing supports gigabit ethernet, or
    >> not? At the moment I have no other gigabit speed devices. thanks
    >>
    >> i
    >>

    > Perhaps, one of these will give the details.
    > # ethtool eth0
    > # mii-tool eth0
    >
    > The network card in my system gives the details you are looking for using
    > ethtool.
    >


    Thank you!!!!!!!! This is beautiful!!!

    This ethtool is great. I used to use mii-tool for my laptop, which
    stopped working in FC7. So I stopped using it, which was bad. Now I
    know to use ethtool instead. For my basement server, it says:

    root:~ ###ethtool eth0
    Settings for eth0:
    Supported ports: [ MII ]
    Supported link modes: 10baseT/Half 10baseT/Full
    100baseT/Half 100baseT/Full
    1000baseT/Full
    Supports auto-negotiation: Yes
    Advertised link modes: 10baseT/Half 10baseT/Full
    100baseT/Half 100baseT/Full
    1000baseT/Full
    Advertised auto-negotiation: Yes
    Speed: 1000Mb/s
    Duplex: Full
    Port: MII
    PHYAD: 9
    Transceiver: external
    Auto-negotiation: on
    Supports Wake-on: g
    Wake-on: d
    Link detected: yes

    So I think that I am all set for gigabit speed.

    i

  6. Re: How to tell if my card is gigabit or not

    I demand that Ignoramus15584 may or may not have written...

    > On Tue, 04 Sep 2007 14:38:14 GMT, Robert Harris

    wrote:
    >> Ignoramus3635 wrote:

    [snip]
    >>> I have a basement server computer with nVidia's CK804 chipset and
    >>> network built into the mobo.
    >>> My question is how to tell if this thing supports gigabit ethernet, or
    >>> not? At the moment I have no other gigabit speed devices. thanks

    >> "lspci" will tell you what sort of Network Controller is on your board.


    > That's exactly what it said:


    > root:~ ###lspci|grep Ethernet
    > 00:0a.0 Bridge: nVidia Corporation CK804 Ethernet Controller (rev a3)


    It should do; use "ethtool -i eth0" (as root, and assuming that the device is
    indeed present as eth0) to check.

    --
    | Darren Salt | linux or ds at | nr. Ashington, | Toon
    | RISC OS, Linux | youmustbejoking,demon,co,uk | Northumberland | Army
    | + Buy local produce. Try to walk or cycle. TRANSPORT CAUSES GLOBAL WARMING.

    Avoid colloquial stuff.

  7. Re: How to tell if my card is gigabit or not

    On Tue, 04 Sep 2007 16:36:26 +0100, Darren Salt wrote:
    > It should do; use "ethtool -i eth0" (as root, and assuming that the device is
    > indeed present as eth0) to check.
    >


    Yes. It supports gigabit. My house is wired with Cat5e wiring, a
    little haphazard, though. What speed do you think I could attain?

    i

  8. Re: How to tell if my card is gigabit or not

    On Tue, 04 Sep 2007 10:48:21 -0500, Ignoramus15584 rearranged some
    electrons to form:

    > On Tue, 04 Sep 2007 16:36:26 +0100, Darren Salt wrote:
    > Yes. It supports gigabit. My house is wired with Cat5e wiring, a
    > little haphazard, though. What speed do you think I could attain?
    >


    You're likely to be throttled by other factors-- hard drives & OS.
    Just because you can send a packet at 1000 MB/sec doesn't mean you can
    generate them or process them at 1000 MB/sec.

    --
    David M (dmacchiarolo)


  9. Re: How to tell if my card is gigabit or not

    Robert Harris writes:

    >Ignoramus3635 wrote:
    >> I decided to undertake, slowly, a project to upgrade my home network
    >> to gigabit speed. Starting with the main switch, I want to buy a 16
    >> port gigabit speed switch.


    Why? Is this a hobby? since I find it extremely unlikely that you are
    transfering gigabytes of information between your home computers regularly.
    It will help not at all with your surfing or getting stuff from outside
    your home.

    >>
    >> I have a basement server computer with nVidia's CK804 chipset and
    >> network built into the mobo.
    >>
    >> My question is how to tell if this thing supports gigabit ethernet, or
    >> not? At the moment I have no other gigabit speed devices. thanks


    So the network will be totally useless. networks are for transfering
    information between computers. gigabit will not speed up transfers between
    one computer with a gigabit card and another with a 100Mb card.


    >>
    >> i


    >"lspci" will tell you what sort of Network Controller is on your board.


    >Robert


  10. Re: How to tell if my card is gigabit or not

    Ignoramus15584 writes:

    >On Tue, 04 Sep 2007 09:30:23 -0600, Douglas Mayne wrote:
    >> On Tue, 04 Sep 2007 07:24:48 -0500, Ignoramus3635 wrote:
    >>
    >>> I decided to undertake, slowly, a project to upgrade my home network
    >>> to gigabit speed. Starting with the main switch, I want to buy a 16
    >>> port gigabit speed switch.
    >>>
    >>> I have a basement server computer with nVidia's CK804 chipset and
    >>> network built into the mobo.
    >>>
    >>> My question is how to tell if this thing supports gigabit ethernet, or
    >>> not? At the moment I have no other gigabit speed devices. thanks
    >>>
    >>> i
    >>>

    >> Perhaps, one of these will give the details.
    >> # ethtool eth0
    >> # mii-tool eth0
    >>
    >> The network card in my system gives the details you are looking for using
    >> ethtool.
    >>


    >Thank you!!!!!!!! This is beautiful!!!


    >This ethtool is great. I used to use mii-tool for my laptop, which
    >stopped working in FC7. So I stopped using it, which was bad. Now I
    >know to use ethtool instead. For my basement server, it says:


    >root:~ ###ethtool eth0
    >Settings for eth0:
    > Supported ports: [ MII ]
    > Supported link modes: 10baseT/Half 10baseT/Full
    > 100baseT/Half 100baseT/Full
    > 1000baseT/Full
    > Supports auto-negotiation: Yes
    > Advertised link modes: 10baseT/Half 10baseT/Full
    > 100baseT/Half 100baseT/Full
    > 1000baseT/Full
    > Advertised auto-negotiation: Yes
    > Speed: 1000Mb/s
    > Duplex: Full
    > Port: MII
    > PHYAD: 9
    > Transceiver: external
    > Auto-negotiation: on
    > Supports Wake-on: g
    > Wake-on: d
    > Link detected: yes


    >So I think that I am all set for gigabit speed.


    No you are not. as I mentioned you need two computers, and all links
    between to be gigabit to get any speed improvement.


    >i


  11. Re: How to tell if my card is gigabit or not

    On Wed, 05 Sep 2007 14:08:37 GMT, Unruh wrote:
    > Robert Harris writes:
    >
    >>Ignoramus3635 wrote:
    >>> I decided to undertake, slowly, a project to upgrade my home network
    >>> to gigabit speed. Starting with the main switch, I want to buy a 16
    >>> port gigabit speed switch.

    >
    > Why? Is this a hobby? since I find it extremely unlikely that you are
    > transfering gigabytes of information between your home computers regularly.
    > It will help not at all with your surfing or getting stuff from outside
    > your home.


    For one thing, I do like fcsking around with computers, for another, I
    like to transfer movies from my server to my laptop.

    >>>
    >>> I have a basement server computer with nVidia's CK804 chipset and
    >>> network built into the mobo.
    >>>
    >>> My question is how to tell if this thing supports gigabit ethernet, or
    >>> not? At the moment I have no other gigabit speed devices. thanks

    >
    > So the network will be totally useless. networks are for transfering
    > information between computers. gigabit will not speed up transfers between
    > one computer with a gigabit card and another with a 100Mb card.


    Looks like the computers in question, in fact, do support gigabit
    speeds. (basement server, backup webserver for my money making
    domains, and laptop). I used ethtool to find out. (highly recommended)

    i

  12. Re: How to tell if my card is gigabit or not

    On Wed, 05 Sep 2007 14:10:33 GMT, Unruh wrote:
    > Ignoramus15584 writes:
    >
    >>On Tue, 04 Sep 2007 09:30:23 -0600, Douglas Mayne wrote:
    >>> On Tue, 04 Sep 2007 07:24:48 -0500, Ignoramus3635 wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I decided to undertake, slowly, a project to upgrade my home network
    >>>> to gigabit speed. Starting with the main switch, I want to buy a 16
    >>>> port gigabit speed switch.
    >>>>
    >>>> I have a basement server computer with nVidia's CK804 chipset and
    >>>> network built into the mobo.
    >>>>
    >>>> My question is how to tell if this thing supports gigabit ethernet, or
    >>>> not? At the moment I have no other gigabit speed devices. thanks
    >>>>
    >>>> i
    >>>>
    >>> Perhaps, one of these will give the details.
    >>> # ethtool eth0
    >>> # mii-tool eth0
    >>>
    >>> The network card in my system gives the details you are looking for using
    >>> ethtool.
    >>>

    >
    >>Thank you!!!!!!!! This is beautiful!!!

    >
    >>This ethtool is great. I used to use mii-tool for my laptop, which
    >>stopped working in FC7. So I stopped using it, which was bad. Now I
    >>know to use ethtool instead. For my basement server, it says:

    >
    >>root:~ ###ethtool eth0
    >>Settings for eth0:
    >> Supported ports: [ MII ]
    >> Supported link modes: 10baseT/Half 10baseT/Full
    >> 100baseT/Half 100baseT/Full
    >> 1000baseT/Full
    >> Supports auto-negotiation: Yes
    >> Advertised link modes: 10baseT/Half 10baseT/Full
    >> 100baseT/Half 100baseT/Full
    >> 1000baseT/Full
    >> Advertised auto-negotiation: Yes
    >> Speed: 1000Mb/s
    >> Duplex: Full
    >> Port: MII
    >> PHYAD: 9
    >> Transceiver: external
    >> Auto-negotiation: on
    >> Supports Wake-on: g
    >> Wake-on: d
    >> Link detected: yes

    >
    >>So I think that I am all set for gigabit speed.

    >
    > No you are not. as I mentioned you need two computers, and all links
    > between to be gigabit to get any speed improvement.


    Well, yes, indeed. I have three gigabit enabled computers (basement
    server, backup webserver, and laptop). All I need is a gigabit enabled
    switch, as well as a gigabit enabled wifi router (which I could use to
    plug in the laptop into using cable if I want gigabit speed). That's
    my finding.

    My older computers are not gigabit enabled, however, but I do not
    care.

    i

  13. Re: How to tell if my card is gigabit or not

    On Wed, 05 Sep 2007 09:30:35 -0500, Ignoramus22620 wrote:
    > On Wed, 05 Sep 2007 14:08:37 GMT, Unruh wrote:
    >> Why? Is this a hobby? since I find it extremely unlikely that you are
    >> transfering gigabytes of information between your home computers regularly.
    >> It will help not at all with your surfing or getting stuff from outside
    >> your home.

    >
    > For one thing, I do like fcsking around with computers, for another, I
    > like to transfer movies from my server to my laptop.


    Another one, making backups would work better.

    i

  14. Re: How to tell if my card is gigabit or not

    Ignoramus22620 writes:

    >On Wed, 05 Sep 2007 14:08:37 GMT, Unruh wrote:
    >> Robert Harris writes:
    >>
    >>>Ignoramus3635 wrote:
    >>>> I decided to undertake, slowly, a project to upgrade my home network
    >>>> to gigabit speed. Starting with the main switch, I want to buy a 16
    >>>> port gigabit speed switch.

    >>
    >> Why? Is this a hobby? since I find it extremely unlikely that you are
    >> transfering gigabytes of information between your home computers regularly.
    >> It will help not at all with your surfing or getting stuff from outside
    >> your home.


    >For one thing, I do like fcsking around with computers, for another, I
    >like to transfer movies from my server to my laptop.


    >>>>
    >>>> I have a basement server computer with nVidia's CK804 chipset and
    >>>> network built into the mobo.
    >>>>
    >>>> My question is how to tell if this thing supports gigabit ethernet, or
    >>>> not? At the moment I have no other gigabit speed devices. thanks

    >>
    >> So the network will be totally useless. networks are for transfering
    >> information between computers. gigabit will not speed up transfers between
    >> one computer with a gigabit card and another with a 100Mb card.


    >Looks like the computers in question, in fact, do support gigabit
    >speeds. (basement server, backup webserver for my money making
    >domains, and laptop). I used ethtool to find out. (highly recommended)


    OK, if they really do then it is worthwhile. You said originally that only
    the one server did. I doubt your laptop does, but if you say so... I have
    been wrong before.



    >i


  15. Re: How to tell if my card is gigabit or not

    Ignoramus22620 writes:


    >Well, yes, indeed. I have three gigabit enabled computers (basement
    >server, backup webserver, and laptop). All I need is a gigabit enabled
    >switch, as well as a gigabit enabled wifi router (which I could use to
    >plug in the laptop into using cable if I want gigabit speed). That's
    >my finding.


    ??? wifi is never gigabit. Not even n. Or were you refering the router part.

    >My older computers are not gigabit enabled, however, but I do not
    >care.

    Becareful. Many routers or switches fall back to the speed of the slowest
    connection. Thus one slow computer could bring down the whole switch.


    >i


  16. Re: How to tell if my card is gigabit or not

    On Wed, 05 Sep 2007 14:08:37 +0000, Unruh wrote:

    >>> I decided to undertake, slowly, a project to upgrade my home network
    >>> to gigabit speed. Starting with the main switch, I want to buy a 16
    >>> port gigabit speed switch.


    > Why? Is this a hobby? since I find it extremely unlikely that you are
    > transfering gigabytes of information between your home computers regularly.


    While I agree with the silliness of upgrading an entire home LAN to
    gigabit speeds (for most folks), the fact remains that *I* do transfer
    GB's of information (mostly ISO's) between computers on my home LAN, quite
    frequently. The time to transfer them isn't a big deal to me, but I can
    see it being nice to do it 10 times as fast.

    Don't be too quick to think others don't do something, just because you
    may not do it.


    --
    "Bother!" said Pooh, as Christopher Robin pleaded to be spanked again.


  17. Re: How to tell if my card is gigabit or not

    In comp.os.linux.networking Unruh wrote:
    > Becareful. Many routers or switches fall back to the speed of the
    > slowest connection. Thus one slow computer could bring down the
    > whole switch.


    Can you give some specifics? Admittedly my experience base with "home
    routers" and their switch components is very limited, but based on my
    experience with other "switches" is such that each port's speed is
    independent of the other. Now, for a _hub_ it might be the case that
    it can only operate at one speed, but a _switch_ should have speed on
    a port by port basis.

    Or were you thinking of the wireless portion rather than the wired?
    The wireless network can be thought of (in broad handwaving terms) as
    a hub.

    rick jones

    a hub is a multi-port repeater operating at the physical layer
    a switch is a multi-port bridge operating at the data-link layer

    --
    No need to believe in either side, or any side. There is no cause.
    There's only yourself. The belief is in your own precision. - Jobert
    these opinions are mine, all mine; HP might not want them anyway...
    feel free to post, OR email to rick.jones2 in hp.com but NOT BOTH...

  18. Re: How to tell if my card is gigabit or not

    On Thu, 6 Sep 2007 21:12:16 +0000 (UTC), Rick Jones wrote:
    > In comp.os.linux.networking Unruh wrote:
    >> Becareful. Many routers or switches fall back to the speed of the
    >> slowest connection. Thus one slow computer could bring down the
    >> whole switch.

    >
    > Can you give some specifics? Admittedly my experience base with "home
    > routers" and their switch components is very limited, but based on my
    > experience with other "switches" is such that each port's speed is
    > independent of the other. Now, for a _hub_ it might be the case that
    > it can only operate at one speed, but a _switch_ should have speed on
    > a port by port basis.
    >
    > Or were you thinking of the wireless portion rather than the wired?
    > The wireless network can be thought of (in broad handwaving terms) as
    > a hub.
    >
    > rick jones
    >
    > a hub is a multi-port repeater operating at the physical layer
    > a switch is a multi-port bridge operating at the data-link layer
    >


    I believe that the switch that I bought, can select best speeds for
    individual connections. I bought that gigabit stuff today from
    Newegg.

    You see, I needed a 16 port switch for my home anyway, and it would
    have been stupid to select a 100 mbps version. With that, buying a
    gigabit Wifi router (gigabit applying to its wired ports, obviously)
    went along naturally.

    In, probably, about one week I will report my findings as to whether I
    can achieve gigabit speeds. That would let me copy a 740 MB pirated
    movie across computers in 6 seconds.

    i

  19. Re: How to tell if my card is gigabit or not

    In comp.os.linux.networking Ignoramus3635 wrote:
    > I believe that the switch that I bought, can select best speeds for
    > individual connections. I bought that gigabit stuff today from
    > Newegg.


    Well, so much for pointing you at http://www.hp.com/go/procurve then

    rick jones
    http://www.netperf.org/
    --
    denial, anger, bargaining, depression, acceptance, rebirth...
    where do you want to be today?
    these opinions are mine, all mine; HP might not want them anyway...
    feel free to post, OR email to rick.jones2 in hp.com but NOT BOTH...

  20. Re: How to tell if my card is gigabit or not

    On Thu, 6 Sep 2007 22:16:16 +0000 (UTC), Rick Jones wrote:
    > In comp.os.linux.networking Ignoramus3635 wrote:
    >> I believe that the switch that I bought, can select best speeds for
    >> individual connections. I bought that gigabit stuff today from
    >> Newegg.

    >
    > Well, so much for pointing you at http://www.hp.com/go/procurve then
    >


    I had several multiple bad experiences with HP, where their products
    are ripoffs and require buying more and more HP products etc. Does not
    reflect on their engineers, of course.

    i

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