video: Inner working of One Laptop per Child (OLPC) Mesh Networking - Networking

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Thread: video: Inner working of One Laptop per Child (OLPC) Mesh Networking

  1. video: Inner working of One Laptop per Child (OLPC) Mesh Networking

    A tech talk about the architecture of mesh networking on OLPC
    communicating even without widespread internet access and how is the
    network they create different from the network at your home or office.
    At
    http://geekvideo.blogspot.com/2007/0...per-child.html


  2. Re: video: Inner working of One Laptop per Child (OLPC) Mesh Networking


    "AnonGoo" wrote in message
    news:1181516162.855755.309560@i13g2000prf.googlegr oups.com...
    >A tech talk about the architecture of mesh networking on OLPC
    > communicating even without widespread internet access and how is the
    > network they create different from the network at your home or office.
    > At
    > http://geekvideo.blogspot.com/2007/0...per-child.html


    Sweet concept!

    I hope it's GPL3'd so Microsoft cannot use the mesh concept in its UMPCs or
    "Surface" PCs.

    jim



  3. Re: video: Inner working of One Laptop per Child (OLPC) Mesh Networking

    On Sun, 10 Jun 2007 19:17:10 -0400, Jim Hubbard rearranged some electrons
    to form:

    >
    > "AnonGoo" wrote in message
    > news:1181516162.855755.309560@i13g2000prf.googlegr oups.com...
    >>A tech talk about the architecture of mesh networking on OLPC
    >> communicating even without widespread internet access and how is the
    >> network they create different from the network at your home or office.
    >> At
    >> http://geekvideo.blogspot.com/2007/0...per-child.html

    >
    > Sweet concept!
    >
    > I hope it's GPL3'd so Microsoft cannot use the mesh concept in its UMPCs or
    > "Surface" PCs.
    >
    > jim


    It is. The software is based on FC6.

    http://www.laptop.org/laptop/software/specs.shtml
    http://www.laptop.org/en/laptop/hardware/specs.shtml


    --
    David M (dmacchiarolo)
    http://home.triad.rr.com/redsled



  4. Re: video: Inner working of One Laptop per Child (OLPC) Mesh Networking

    __/ [ Jim Hubbard ] on Monday 11 June 2007 00:17 \__

    >
    > "AnonGoo" wrote in message
    > news:1181516162.855755.309560@i13g2000prf.googlegr oups.com...
    >>A tech talk about the architecture of mesh networking on OLPC
    >> communicating even without widespread internet access and how is the
    >> network they create different from the network at your home or office.
    >> At
    >>

    http://geekvideo.blogspot.com/2007/0...per-child.html
    >
    > Sweet concept!
    >
    > I hope it's GPL3'd so Microsoft cannot use the mesh concept in its UMPCs or
    > "Surface" PCs.


    A point many people seem to miss is that OLPC has this capability which is
    one among many reasons those other 'contenders' (the one from Asustek for
    example) are simply not suitable for the market OLPC addresses.

    --
    ~~ Best of wishes

    http://Schestowitz.com | Open Prospects PGP-Key: 0x74572E8E
    Tasks: 120 total, 1 running, 116 sleeping, 0 stopped, 3 zombie
    http://iuron.com - knowledge engine, not a search engine

  5. Re: video: Inner working of One Laptop per Child (OLPC) Mesh Networking

    In article ,
    "Jim Hubbard" wrote:
    > Sweet concept!
    >
    > I hope it's GPL3'd so Microsoft cannot use the mesh concept in its UMPCs or
    > "Surface" PCs.


    Mesh networks are not new, and Microsoft is free to use them, regardless
    of what license the one particular mesh implementation in OLPC uses.



    --
    --Tim Smith

  6. Re: video: Inner working of One Laptop per Child (OLPC) Mesh Networking

    Roy Schestowitz wrote:

    > A point many people seem to miss is that OLPC has this capability which is
    > one among many reasons those other 'contenders' (the one from Asustek for
    > example) are simply not suitable for the market OLPC addresses.
    >


    And it's also a reason (independence from central servers) for it to be
    opposed.

  7. Re: video: Inner working of One Laptop per Child (OLPC) Mesh Networking




    >http://geekvideo.blogspot.com/2007/0...per-child.html


    Could someone please write up a one-paragraph
    explanation of what is on the video? Vision
    impaired folks can't see it and Lynx is a bit
    dodgy with the audio track. Thanks!


  8. Re: video: Inner working of One Laptop per Child (OLPC) Mesh Networking

    invalid@example.com wrote:

    >>http://geekvideo.blogspot.com/2007/0...per-child.html

    >
    >
    > Could someone please write up a one-paragraph
    > explanation of what is on the video? Vision
    > impaired folks can't see it and Lynx is a bit
    > dodgy with the audio track. Thanks!
    >

    They have these little laptops with monchrome screens. They basically
    look like toys and part of that is because they are green and have two
    antenna that stick up like ears. All of the computers can talk to each
    other automatically without having to do any set-up. If the first one in
    the mesh is connected to the internet then the next one can share the
    connection. If each has a wireless range of 300ft then if you have 4 of
    them in a staightline extending away from the web connection the last
    one would 1200 ft away and it could still be on the web. They can also
    share applicatione between them without being on the web. In the example
    give one was reading an e-book and it shared that application with
    another one. It too was reading the book, but could be in a different
    place. Is supposed to be simple as meant for children.

    Ian Singer

    --


    ================================================== =======================
    See my homepage at http://www.iansinger.com
    hosted on http://www.1and1.com/?k_id=10623894
    All genealogy is stored in TMG from http://www.whollygenes.com
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    I am near Toronto Canada, can I tell where you are from your reply?
    ================================================== =======================

  9. Re: video: Inner working of One Laptop per Child (OLPC) Mesh Networking

    On Jun 11, 2:27 am, John Bailo wrote:
    > Roy Schestowitz wrote:
    > > A point many people seem to miss is that OLPC has this capability which is
    > > one among many reasons those other 'contenders' (the one from Asustek for
    > > example) are simply not suitable for the market OLPC addresses.

    >
    > And it's also a reason (independence from central servers) for it to be
    > opposed.


    It is only such a reason for people with dictatorial mindsets.

    Independence from central servers is not a disadvantage, it is an
    advantage. Even if you cannot connect to the internet, you still
    potentially have a local network.

    The reason people oppose it is because such networks can avoid
    government inflicted censorship.

    Dean G.


  10. Re: video: Inner working of One Laptop per Child (OLPC) Mesh Networking



    Ian Singer wrote:
    >
    >
    >invalid@example.com wrote:
    >
    >>>http://geekvideo.blogspot.com/2007/0...per-child.html

    >>
    >>
    >> Could someone please write up a one-paragraph
    >> explanation of what is on the video? Vision
    >> impaired folks can't see it and Lynx is a bit
    >> dodgy with the audio track. Thanks!
    >>

    >They have these little laptops with monchrome screens. They basically
    >look like toys and part of that is because they are green and have two
    >antenna that stick up like ears. All of the computers can talk to each
    >other automatically without having to do any set-up. If the first one in
    >the mesh is connected to the internet then the next one can share the
    >connection. If each has a wireless range of 300ft then if you have 4 of
    >them in a staightline extending away from the web connection the last
    >one would 1200 ft away and it could still be on the web. They can also
    >share applicatione between them without being on the web. In the example
    >give one was reading an e-book and it shared that application with
    >another one. It too was reading the book, but could be in a different
    >place. Is supposed to be simple as meant for children.


    Thanks! What do they use for the micro processor
    and the operating system? Monchrome screens --
    those can be read in direct sunlight, right?
    I think a lot of these poor countries have schools
    that are outdoors or just have a roof with no walls.
    do they have solar re-chargers or may be a hand crank?
    I hope they include a programming language --
    perhaps small talk or basic or python? Imagine ten
    million kids all knowing how to write programs!



  11. Re: video: Inner working of One Laptop per Child (OLPC) Mesh Networking

    On Tue, 12 Jun 2007 07:36:41 +0000, invalid rearranged some electrons to
    form:

    >
    >
    > Ian Singer wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>invalid@example.com wrote:
    >>
    >>>>http://geekvideo.blogspot.com/2007/0...per-child.html
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Could someone please write up a one-paragraph
    >>> explanation of what is on the video? Vision
    >>> impaired folks can't see it and Lynx is a bit
    >>> dodgy with the audio track. Thanks!
    >>>

    >>They have these little laptops with monchrome screens. They basically
    >>look like toys and part of that is because they are green and have two
    >>antenna that stick up like ears. All of the computers can talk to each
    >>other automatically without having to do any set-up. If the first one in
    >>the mesh is connected to the internet then the next one can share the
    >>connection. If each has a wireless range of 300ft then if you have 4 of
    >>them in a staightline extending away from the web connection the last
    >>one would 1200 ft away and it could still be on the web. They can also
    >>share applicatione between them without being on the web. In the example
    >>give one was reading an e-book and it shared that application with
    >>another one. It too was reading the book, but could be in a different
    >>place. Is supposed to be simple as meant for children.

    >
    > Thanks! What do they use for the micro processor
    > and the operating system? Monchrome screens --
    > those can be read in direct sunlight, right?
    > I think a lot of these poor countries have schools
    > that are outdoors or just have a roof with no walls.
    > do they have solar re-chargers or may be a hand crank?
    > I hope they include a programming language --
    > perhaps small talk or basic or python? Imagine ten
    > million kids all knowing how to write programs!


    They ditched the hand crank in the latest version, although the prototypes
    had them. They have no rotating storage, only flash memory.
    The OS is based on Fedora Core 6.

    AMD Geode LX-700@0.8W
    CPU clock speed: 433 Mhz
    North Bridge: PCI and Memory Interface integrated with Geode CPU
    Chipset: AMD CS5536 South Bridge (datasheet)
    Graphics controller: Integrated with Geode CPU; unified memory architectue

    http://www.laptop.org/laptop/software/specs.shtml
    http://www.laptop.org/en/laptop/hardware/specs.shtml


    --
    David M (dmacchiarolo)


  12. Re: video: Inner working of One Laptop per Child (OLPC) Mesh Networking

    invalid@example.com> wrote in news:ksudndP3JKqW0PPb4p2dnA@giganews.com:

    >
    > Thanks! What do they use for the micro processor
    > and the operating system?


    AMD Geode LX-700 for the processor and a Linux distro based on Fedora
    core 6.

    > Monchrome screens --
    > those can be read in direct sunlight, right?


    Yep, but the screens are dual mode TFT's, capable of displaying in colour
    too.

    > I think a lot of these poor countries have schools
    > that are outdoors or just have a roof with no walls.
    > do they have solar re-chargers or may be a hand crank?


    They have versions with hand cranks, foot pedals and pull cords.

    > I hope they include a programming language --
    > perhaps small talk or basic or python? Imagine ten
    > million kids all knowing how to write programs!
    >

    They have python and Javascript built in, but they don't mention any
    compilers or IDEs.

  13. Re: video: Inner working of One Laptop per Child (OLPC) Mesh Networking

    On Tue, 12 Jun 2007 01:24:39 +0100, Roy Schestowitz
    wrote:

    > I think it's self balancing (in terms of the load). Apart from the fact
    > that traffic should be encrypted, you also need to find routes that are
    > not overly congested. If you are in a highly populated area, there are
    > many routes you can choose from.


    The "mesh" sounds like a text-book description of how the internet is
    supposed to work, and problem of every child in the class piggy-backing on
    one person's connection sounds like the reality of internet access. (Most
    of us depend on a single route for at least some part of the link between
    our machines and the wider internet.)

    What part of this is supposed to be new?

  14. Re: video: Inner working of One Laptop per Child (OLPC) Mesh Networking

    invalid@example.com> wrote:

    > Thanks! What do they use for the micro processor
    > and the operating system?


    Didn't say. Clip was on the networking only.

    > Monchrome screens --
    > those can be read in direct sunlight, right?


    Didn't say. Clip was on the networking only.

    > do they have solar re-chargers or may be a hand crank?
    > I hope they include a programming language --
    > perhaps small talk or basic or python? Imagine ten
    > million kids all knowing how to write programs!
    >
    >

    Didn't say. Clip was on the networking only.


    --


    ================================================== =======================
    See my homepage at http://www.iansinger.com
    hosted on http://www.1and1.com/?k_id=10623894
    All genealogy is stored in TMG from http://www.whollygenes.com
    Charts and searching using TNG from http://www.tngsitebuilding.com
    I am near Toronto Canada, can I tell where you are from your reply?
    ================================================== =======================

  15. Re: video: Inner working of One Laptop per Child (OLPC) Mesh Networking

    __/ [ Ken Hagan ] on Tuesday 12 June 2007 11:55 \__

    > On Tue, 12 Jun 2007 01:24:39 +0100, Roy Schestowitz
    > wrote:
    >
    >> I think it's self balancing (in terms of the load). Apart from the fact
    >> that traffic should be encrypted, you also need to find routes that are
    >> not overly congested. If you are in a highly populated area, there are
    >> many routes you can choose from.

    >
    > The "mesh" sounds like a text-book description of how the internet is
    > supposed to work, and problem of every child in the class piggy-backing on
    > one person's connection sounds like the reality of internet access. (Most
    > of us depend on a single route for at least some part of the link between
    > our machines and the wider internet.)
    >
    > What part of this is supposed to be new?


    This is peer-based mesh, so the routers are not spread around near the nodes.

    --
    ~~ Best of wishes
    Roy S. Schestowitz
    http://Schestowitz.com | RHAT GNU/Linux PGP-Key: 0x74572E8E
    1:00pm up 1 day 4:56, 8 users, load average: 0.62, 0.67, 0.75
    http://iuron.com - help build a non-profit search engine

  16. Re: video: Inner working of One Laptop per Child (OLPC) Mesh Networking

    "Ken Hagan" wrote in message
    newsp.tts1x0f7m60l4k@khagan.ttx...
    > The "mesh" sounds like a text-book description of how the internet
    > is supposed to work, and problem of every child in the class piggy-
    > backing on one person's connection sounds like the reality of
    > internet access. (Most of us depend on a single route for at least
    > some part of the link between our machines and the wider internet.)
    >
    > What part of this is supposed to be new?


    Some wireless technologies, like WiFi, only allow peers to talk directly to
    each other if they're within range for direct communication; others, like
    GSM, only allow peers to talk if they're both in range of a base station.
    Meshes allow peers to communicate through one or more third party peers,
    extending the range significantly and/or reducing the amount of power you
    need to reach a peer (by making several low-power hops instead of one
    high-power one). Of course, the reachability of a peer (or your uplink to
    the Internet) is then unpredictable, since it depends on where other devices
    are, not just yours.

    Most of the advances in OLPC are just in making existing technologies (a)
    easy to use or automatic and (b) dirt cheap. The OS's security model is
    about the only completely novel feature, and it remains to be seen how good
    it is against live adversaries or unexpected threats.

    S

    --
    Stephen Sprunk "Those people who think they know everything
    CCIE #3723 are a great annoyance to those of us who do."
    K5SSS --Isaac Asimov


    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


  17. Re: video: Inner working of One Laptop per Child (OLPC) Mesh Networking

    Ian Singer wrote:
    > They have these little laptops with monchrome screens.


    Actually it's way more clever than that. The displays have a high-resolution
    high-contract B&W mode, and a lower-resolution lower-contrast color mode.

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