How does bandwidth work? - Networking

This is a discussion on How does bandwidth work? - Networking ; I have a broadband connection with an effective download rate of 25-30 Kb/s. I find that even when I am downloading far less than this, other connections are blocked. The principle seems to be that so long as there is ...

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Thread: How does bandwidth work?

  1. How does bandwidth work?

    I have a broadband connection with an effective download rate of 25-30 Kb/s.
    I find that even when I am downloading far less than this, other
    connections are blocked. The principle seems to be that so long as there
    is a solid band on a time basis, it is irrelevant that the height of that
    band (the bandwidth scale) is less than maximum. Other apps "can't get a
    word in." I notice that Downloader for X seems to pulse the download when
    the download rate is restricted, allowing gaps for other applications.

    Have I got this right?

    Doug.
    --
    Love is not love
    Which alters when it alteration finds
    - Shakespeare.


  2. Re: How does bandwidth work?


    "Doug Laidlaw" wrote in message
    news:v5alg4-m69.ln1@dougshost.douglaidlaw.net...
    >I have a broadband connection with an effective download rate of 25-30
    >Kb/s.
    > I find that even when I am downloading far less than this, other
    > connections are blocked. The principle seems to be that so long as there
    > is a solid band on a time basis, it is irrelevant that the height of that
    > band (the bandwidth scale) is less than maximum. Other apps "can't get a
    > word in." I notice that Downloader for X seems to pulse the download when
    > the download rate is restricted, allowing gaps for other applications.
    >
    > Have I got this right?
    >
    > Doug.
    > --
    > Love is not love
    > Which alters when it alteration finds
    > - Shakespeare.
    >


    You might want to supply more information. DSL or cable or satellite?
    Lately, some providers in the NE have had some trouble.

    Also, 25-30 Kb/sec? Generally, we say KB/s is KiloBytes per second, and
    Kb/s (little b) is kilobits/second. If when downloading, it tells you
    25KB/s, then that's likely KiloBytes. that would be roughly (times 8) a
    connection specified at 256K (I think providers like to list their speeds in
    kilobits cause the numbers are 8 times bigger). Whether they limit you to a
    single download at a time, that's their policy perhaps. Sounds like a poor
    provider - maybe even satellite (Direcway?) 256kbit isn't much bandwidth at
    all. If you're paying for 'broadband' you're getting scarcely 4 or 5 times
    dial up. On cable I get 400kilobytes/s (100 times dialup) from some
    servers, and other DSL services, you can get (1500 down by 256 up?) 200 or
    so KB/s download speeds. Fire someone if you can.

    JB



  3. Re: How does bandwidth work?

    Doug Laidlaw wrote:
    > I have a broadband connection with an effective download rate of 25-30 Kb/s.
    > I find that even when I am downloading far less than this, other
    > connections are blocked. The principle seems to be that so long as there
    > is a solid band on a time basis, it is irrelevant that the height of that
    > band (the bandwidth scale) is less than maximum. Other apps "can't get a
    > word in." I notice that Downloader for X seems to pulse the download when
    > the download rate is restricted, allowing gaps for other applications.
    >
    > Have I got this right?
    >
    > Doug.


    It could be the upload side that is causing you problems, not the
    download side. This is often the case when using bittorrent or other
    sharing programs - your upload link is saturated, and that effectively
    blocks downloads. The issue here is that tcp/ip downloads require a few
    small packets upwards as well. Even excluding things like dns queries,
    each tcp/ip connection will require at least a request from the client,
    and an acknowledge packet. These are small, but important, and if you
    already have a lot of upwards packets from bittorrent, these packets end
    up at the back of the queue. DSL modems often have quite long queues,
    so you might find that your little ACK packet is delayed for a second or
    more, thus blocking the download. The key to avoiding this situation is
    using a router with traffic shaping to let the small packets skip the queue.

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