Fake address for NAT connection support (IPv4) - Networking

This is a discussion on Fake address for NAT connection support (IPv4) - Networking ; My ISP assigns me a public static IP address but for my gateway machine's WAN connection they give me a static RFC1918 address. They must do some static transformation of my packets at their end, mapping between the RFC1918 address ...

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Thread: Fake address for NAT connection support (IPv4)

  1. Fake address for NAT connection support (IPv4)

    My ISP assigns me a public static IP address but for my gateway
    machine's WAN connection they give me a static RFC1918 address. They
    must do some static transformation of my packets at their end, mapping
    between the RFC1918 address and the public address.

    This messes up my ability to use connection tracking to support
    protocols that cross my gateway's IP masquerading: it's putting the
    wrong address into the protocols when it rewrites the content.

    Is it possible to have it write the public IP address into them somehow?
    I can imagine I can do it if I give its WAN interface the public
    address, then have another not-connection-tracking 'outer gateway'
    between the gateway and my ISP that does the reverse of the
    transformation they do.

    But, can I achieve the same effect without needing another machine?
    (Or another ISP. (-

    -- Mark

  2. Re: Fake address for NAT connection support (IPv4)

    Hi Mark -

    On Tue, 27 Mar 2007 11:00:01 -0400, Mark.Carroll@Aetion.com (Mark T.B.
    Carroll) wrote:

    >But, can I achieve the same effect without needing another machine?
    >(Or another ISP. (-


    With my DSL modem the default configuration was to function in NAT
    mode, however it was easy to change it to bridge mode, which allowed
    my own Linux-based router to have my public static IP address on the
    WAN interface.

    --
    Ken
    http://www.kensims.net/

  3. Re: Fake address for NAT connection support (IPv4)

    Ken Sims writes:

    > Hi Mark -
    >
    > On Tue, 27 Mar 2007 11:00:01 -0400, Mark.Carroll@Aetion.com (Mark T.B.
    > Carroll) wrote:
    >
    >>But, can I achieve the same effect without needing another machine?
    >>(Or another ISP. (-

    >
    > With my DSL modem the default configuration was to function in NAT
    > mode, however it was easy to change it to bridge mode, which allowed
    > my own Linux-based router to have my public static IP address on the
    > WAN interface.


    Unfortunately, I can't currently do that with my ISP: to get my traffic
    in and out I /have/ to have on my WAN interface the RFC1918 static
    address they assigned to me. If I could have my public static IP address
    on the WAN interface there'd be no problem whatsoever. (So I was
    wondering if I can have the protocol-content-rewriting work as if my WAN
    interface had a different IP to what it actually does.)

    -- Mark

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