On 1 Jan 2007, in the Usenet newsgroup comp.os.linux.networking, in article
<1167697037.575514.12920@n51g2000cwc.googlegroups.c om>, tom@xdus.net wrote:

>This was the routing table as it was setup from the gui. The default
>gateway was the fc6 box yet it still didn't work.
>
>~ # ip r
>192.168.0.0/24 dev eth1 proto kernel scope link src 192.168.0.12
>10.0.0.0/8 dev br0 proto kernel scope link src 10.0.0.252
>127.0.0.0/8 dev lo scope link
>default via 192.168.0.1 dev eth1
>default via 10.0.0.101 dev br0


"Houston, we got a problem here."

>All I had to do was manually add a route as you suggested. And it
>works.


>So now my question is why wasn't the default route used.


_WHICH_ default?

>Using the gui on the router I entered the default gw now there are two
>this was problem most likely.


default route: If you want to go to 'a', use route A. If you want to
go to 'b', use route B. If you want to go to 'c', use route C. If "A',
'B', or 'C' won't take you where you want to go, use route D. If "A',
'B', or 'C' won't take you where you want to go, use route E. So do you
use route D, or E to get to 'f'?

If two (or more) default routes with the same metric exist (see the
output of the command /sbin/route -n), the kernel will use the _LAST_
one that was declared. - figuring that you changed your mind, but forgot
to remove the "old" one. If the metric differs, the route with the lower
metric is chosen.

Old guy