Why was the hub faster than the switch? - Network

This is a discussion on Why was the hub faster than the switch? - Network ; Could someone give me a technical reason why, when I connected a cable modem and three computers to a hub, it was faster than connecting a cable modem and three computers with a switch? I know that routers are the ...

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Thread: Why was the hub faster than the switch?

  1. Why was the hub faster than the switch?

    Could someone give me a technical reason why, when I connected a cable modem
    and three computers to a hub, it was faster than connecting a cable modem
    and three computers with a switch?

    I know that routers are the solution, but I am in a debate and am drawing on
    my past experience. For example, when using a packet sniffer, you want to
    be a part of the same collision an broadcast domain. You can do that with a
    hub, but you can't with a switch.

    It must be the same principle when you only have 2 or 3 computers on the
    same network and collisions are not a problem. Am I right and if I am,
    could someone explain why?

    TIA



  2. Re: Why was the hub faster than the switch?


    "RobW" wrote in message
    news:jNKkf.134849$y_1.117988@edtnps89...
    > Could someone give me a technical reason why, when I connected a cable
    > modem and three computers to a hub, it was faster than connecting a cable
    > modem and three computers with a switch?
    >
    > I know that routers are the solution, but I am in a debate and am drawing
    > on my past experience. For example, when using a packet sniffer, you want
    > to be a part of the same collision an broadcast domain. You can do that
    > with a hub, but you can't with a switch.
    >
    > It must be the same principle when you only have 2 or 3 computers on the
    > same network and collisions are not a problem. Am I right and if I am,
    > could someone explain why?
    >


    Well I guess because a switch actually directs traffic appropriately rather
    than throwing it out of all ports, there must be some sort of overhead in
    working this out - but you don't say how you measured it etc...?
    James



  3. Re: Why was the hub faster than the switch?

    How did you determine the hub was faster?

    Think of a switch as an electronic version of a mechanical switch that connects the appropriate ports together. That's why you can't
    sniff packets from one port to another. Although with higher end switches you can setup a mon port that is the sum of all traffic on
    the port for sniffers. If the switch was slower than the hub it must have been a poorly designed low end switch. With so few
    computers on the switch I would be surprised that you would see a difference either way.

    You can still have collisions on a switch if your devices are not full duplex.

    RobW wrote:
    > Could someone give me a technical reason why, when I connected a cable modem
    > and three computers to a hub, it was faster than connecting a cable modem
    > and three computers with a switch?
    >
    > I know that routers are the solution, but I am in a debate and am drawing on
    > my past experience. For example, when using a packet sniffer, you want to
    > be a part of the same collision an broadcast domain. You can do that with a
    > hub, but you can't with a switch.
    >
    > It must be the same principle when you only have 2 or 3 computers on the
    > same network and collisions are not a problem. Am I right and if I am,
    > could someone explain why?
    >
    > TIA
    >
    >


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