Wireless Network Problem - Network

This is a discussion on Wireless Network Problem - Network ; I have a Motorola cable modem w/ a Motorola router and Motorola wireless card on a computer in another room in my home. As part of the security, the router seems to change IP addresses occasionally and though the main ...

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Thread: Wireless Network Problem

  1. Wireless Network Problem

    I have a Motorola cable modem w/ a Motorola router and Motorola
    wireless card on a computer in another room in my home. As part of
    the security, the router seems to change IP addresses occasionally and
    though the main box works fine, the romote box with the wireless card
    doesn't seem to search for this new IP which causes the network
    connection to drop for the remote machine - otherwise, it works fine
    (when it is working).

    Has anyone else had experience with this? Is there a way to get the
    remote machine to query for the network IP once the router changes
    it???

    Both are Windows XP machines.

    thanks,

    Chris

  2. Re: Wireless Network Problem

    Chris,

    The remote computer could be set to "Obtain an IP address automatically"
    which is found in Properties of the wireless network interface on that
    computer.

    I've never heard of a router changing IP addresses for security purposes.
    That seems unlikely. However, it may change IP addresses if:
    1) the router is set up to provide IP addresses to computers using DHCP -
    which it appears is the case.
    2) the remote computer is turned off / goes off the network so that its IP
    address becomes "available" for other computers.

    The alternative to all this may be to assign a fixed IP address to the
    wireless interface that's in the range of the IP addresses you're using with
    the router and other computers. Then the remote computer will always have
    the same IP address. A good way to implement this is to have the DHCP in
    the router set up to work in a different part of the range. For example:

    I will assume the router internal LAN address is 192.168.1.1. (It could be
    something else like 192.168.0.1 or 10.0.0.1 so the following numbers would
    change accordingly if that's the case).

    Assign fixed IP addresses to computers on the LAN:
    192.168.1.2, .3, .4 ......
    Set the router DHCP to start at:
    192.168.1.100 and maybe assign only one or a few IP addresses.

    With this arrangement, computers set to obtain an IP address automatically
    will get addresses 192.168.1.100, .101, .102 ... etc.
    In the mean time, computers with fixed addresses can have:
    192.168.1.2, .3, .4 .... .49, .50, .... .99

    Both fixed and automatic IP addresses can live peacefully in the same LAN
    this way. So how you do it is a matter of choice.

    In general one might reserve DHCP / automatic addressing for large networks
    where managing fixed (or static) addresses would be a pain. The other
    reasons for using DHCP might be:
    - you want to be able to plug in a "foreign" laptop and just have it work
    without messing with network settings.
    - you have users who are unfamiliar with making the network settings and
    want to simplify things.

    Otherwise, using static IP addresses on a small network removes a degree of
    uncertainty when you're doing setup and troubleshooting, etc. No need to
    ask if DHCP is working. No need to puzzle over why suddenly machines are
    getting Automatic Private IP Addressing (APIPA) addresses (that start with
    169.xxx.....) and don't see the network......

    Now, in a simple peer-to-peer network *without* a router you could use
    APIPA - but that's not your situation

    You didn't say which operating system you're using. I'm assuming Windows.
    I do suggest if you're going to use fixed IP addresses and have an earlier
    version of Windows that you uncheck the box that says to detect network
    settings automatically (which is separate from the getting an IP address
    automatically setting) .... something like that ... or you may find your
    settings being changed without notice! I've only seen this happen a few
    times but can't completely rule out human intervention!

    Fred

    wrote in message
    news:m0f4l05hac64r8jtthqmpkjggl7v7mpckm@4ax.com...
    >I have a Motorola cable modem w/ a Motorola router and Motorola
    > wireless card on a computer in another room in my home. As part of
    > the security, the router seems to change IP addresses occasionally and
    > though the main box works fine, the romote box with the wireless card
    > doesn't seem to search for this new IP which causes the network
    > connection to drop for the remote machine - otherwise, it works fine
    > (when it is working).
    >
    > Has anyone else had experience with this? Is there a way to get the
    > remote machine to query for the network IP once the router changes
    > it???
    >
    > Both are Windows XP machines.
    >
    > thanks,
    >
    > Chris




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