IP, Subnet and Standard-Gateway in Win 2000 - Network

This is a discussion on IP, Subnet and Standard-Gateway in Win 2000 - Network ; Hello maybe someone can help me to understand: I just tested the following configurations of two PCs connected with a Switch, Windows 2000 and TCP/ IP: A) PC1 PC2 IP: 10.1.18.50 IP: 10.1.18.51 Sub: 255.255.0.0 Sub: 255.255.0.0 SGw: non SGw ...

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Thread: IP, Subnet and Standard-Gateway in Win 2000

  1. IP, Subnet and Standard-Gateway in Win 2000

    Hello

    maybe someone can help me to understand:
    I just tested the following configurations of two PCs connected with a
    Switch, Windows 2000 and TCP/ IP:
    A)
    PC1 PC2
    IP: 10.1.18.50 IP: 10.1.18.51
    Sub: 255.255.0.0 Sub: 255.255.0.0
    SGw: non SGw non
    -> Result: Each PC can Ping the other
    B)
    PC1 PC2
    IP: 10.1.18.50 IP: 10.1.18.51
    Sub: 255.255.255.0(!) Sub: 255.255.0.0
    SGw: non SGw non
    -> Each PC can Ping the other
    C)
    PC1 PC2
    IP: 10.1.20.50 (!) IP: 10.1.18.51
    Sub: 255.255.0.0 Sub: 255.255.0.0
    SGw: non SGw non
    -> Result: Each PC can Ping the other
    D)
    PC1 PC2
    IP: 10.1.20.50 IP: 10.1.18.51
    Sub: 255.255.255.0(!) Sub: 255.255.0.0
    SGw: non SGw non
    -> Result: No PC can Ping the other (!)
    (PC1 tries not even tries to do so)
    E)
    PC1 PC2
    IP: 10.1.20.50 IP: 10.1.18.51
    Sub: 255.255.255.0(!) Sub: 255.255.0.0
    SGw: 10.1.18.51 SGw non
    -> Result: No PC can Ping the other (!)

    So: why can't PC2 find the PC1 in Configuration D?
    Why do both PCs can find each other, when just one PC has a Standard
    Gateway?
    Why does the PC1 can find the PC2 in Configuration D via Standard
    Gateway? - The Standard-Gateway is the adress, which is not reachable!


    Sharky

  2. Re: IP, Subnet and Standard-Gateway in Win 2000

    If i was to give you a few rules
    1) 255 in the subnet address means that any other computer on the
    network has to have the same number,
    2) a 0 means that it can be any number between 0 and 255 (1 and 254 in
    some cases).
    3) The subnet addresses have to be the same (in the case of d and e
    they are not)

    If you look at your examples with those rules in place, you may answer
    your own question.

    James

    schoolshark@gmx.de (Sharky) wrote in message news:<89ba01cc.0409150706.79ae644f@posting.google.com>...
    > Hello
    >
    > maybe someone can help me to understand:
    > I just tested the following configurations of two PCs connected with a
    > Switch, Windows 2000 and TCP/ IP:
    > A)
    > PC1 PC2
    > IP: 10.1.18.50 IP: 10.1.18.51
    > Sub: 255.255.0.0 Sub: 255.255.0.0
    > SGw: non SGw non
    > -> Result: Each PC can Ping the other
    > B)
    > PC1 PC2
    > IP: 10.1.18.50 IP: 10.1.18.51
    > Sub: 255.255.255.0(!) Sub: 255.255.0.0
    > SGw: non SGw non
    > -> Each PC can Ping the other
    > C)
    > PC1 PC2
    > IP: 10.1.20.50 (!) IP: 10.1.18.51
    > Sub: 255.255.0.0 Sub: 255.255.0.0
    > SGw: non SGw non
    > -> Result: Each PC can Ping the other
    > D)
    > PC1 PC2
    > IP: 10.1.20.50 IP: 10.1.18.51
    > Sub: 255.255.255.0(!) Sub: 255.255.0.0
    > SGw: non SGw non
    > -> Result: No PC can Ping the other (!)
    > (PC1 tries not even tries to do so)
    > E)
    > PC1 PC2
    > IP: 10.1.20.50 IP: 10.1.18.51
    > Sub: 255.255.255.0(!) Sub: 255.255.0.0
    > SGw: 10.1.18.51 SGw non
    > -> Result: No PC can Ping the other (!)
    >
    > So: why can't PC2 find the PC1 in Configuration D?
    > Why do both PCs can find each other, when just one PC has a Standard
    > Gateway?
    > Why does the PC1 can find the PC2 in Configuration D via Standard
    > Gateway? - The Standard-Gateway is the adress, which is not reachable!
    >
    >
    > Sharky


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