Packet loss with Wireless Card - Network

This is a discussion on Packet loss with Wireless Card - Network ; I have an Orinoco Gold a/b/g wireless card in my laptop running Windows 2000. In the card's management software, it shows me status on the card and its interface. My card seems to work fine, but I notice a lot ...

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Thread: Packet loss with Wireless Card

  1. Packet loss with Wireless Card

    I have an Orinoco Gold a/b/g wireless card in my laptop running
    Windows 2000. In the card's management software, it shows me status
    on the card and its interface. My card seems to work fine, but I
    notice a lot of packet loss. I noticed after using the card for an
    hour, I had approx 12,000 packets received OK and 43,000 packets with
    an error. Is this behavior normal? I notice the same behavior at
    home using a Linksys access point, and at work using a Cisco access
    point.

  2. Re: Packet loss with Wireless Card

    Martin.Zeigler@insightbb.com (Martin Zeigler) wrote in message news:...
    > I have an Orinoco Gold a/b/g wireless card in my laptop running
    > Windows 2000. In the card's management software, it shows me status
    > on the card and its interface. My card seems to work fine, but I
    > notice a lot of packet loss. I noticed after using the card for an
    > hour, I had approx 12,000 packets received OK and 43,000 packets with
    > an error. Is this behavior normal? I notice the same behavior at
    > home using a Linksys access point, and at work using a Cisco access
    > point.


    Two primary drivers for packet loss are 1) signal strength (low), and
    2) interference. Haven't run 802.11x on Win2k, but know that XP will
    indicate strength level (i.e. excellent, good, and so on). This level
    can will affected by loss, a result of distance and any kind of
    obstruction between the PC and the AP. Certain composition wall
    materials will produce more loss than others, as will the amount of
    metal in the construction. Additionally, be aware that going up or
    down a floor can have the effects. 802.11b is range is "up to 300 ft"
    but this is under optimal conditions; usually it is less, but
    sufficient for most in home applications.

    Interference can result of other network on the same channel, as well
    as devices such as microwaves and cordless phones on the 2.4Ghz band.
    Ensuring that the microwave is out of the direct path between the
    PC-AP will greatly diminish that problem. Interference from the phone
    will be intermittent, being worse when on a call.

    If another network is causing the interference and packet loss, moving
    the network to another channel will resolve this. The wireless control
    panel on the PC will list any networks of sufficient strenght to
    connect to, so you can use this to determine of this a source of the
    problem. Potentially, even if the signal of the other network isn't
    strong enough to connect to, it can still cause interference and
    packet loss, so again, moving to another channel may resolve this.

    There are applications which are able to give extensive info on the
    local wireless environment, such as Airsnort, if you have the
    technical inclination to use it - usually requires building an ad-hoc
    antenna (very simple, really).

    Hope this helps.

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