two interfaces - same network - different subnet mask - Network

This is a discussion on two interfaces - same network - different subnet mask - Network ; On a windows 2000 Server I know that I can't have two interfaces belonging to the same subnet. But what happens if I put the two interfaces in the same network e.g. 192.168.1.0 but with a different subnet mask for ...

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  1. two interfaces - same network - different subnet mask

    On a windows 2000 Server I know that I can't have two interfaces belonging
    to the same subnet.

    But what happens if I put the two interfaces in the same network e.g.
    192.168.1.0 but with a different subnet mask for each interface? Will I have
    communication between the two interfaces??

    Probably this is a more general networking question but, can the following
    hosts communicate without a router:
    Host A - IP address: 192.168.1.1 and Subnet mask: 255.255.255.255
    Host B - IP address: 192.168.1.2 and Subnet mask: 255.255.255.255

    Thanks in advance.





  2. Re: two interfaces - same network - different subnet mask

    Short answer: on Windows 2000, you can have two or more interfaces connected to the same physical network and configured within the same subnet.

    --
    Dmitry Korolyov [d__k@removethispart.mail.ru]
    MVP: Windows Server - Active Directory


    "Netmasker" wrote in message news:bp6aa6$t4q$1@nic.grnet.gr...
    On a windows 2000 Server I know that I can't have two interfaces belonging
    to the same subnet.

    But what happens if I put the two interfaces in the same network e.g.
    192.168.1.0 but with a different subnet mask for each interface? Will I have
    communication between the two interfaces??

    Probably this is a more general networking question but, can the following
    hosts communicate without a router:
    Host A - IP address: 192.168.1.1 and Subnet mask: 255.255.255.255
    Host B - IP address: 192.168.1.2 and Subnet mask: 255.255.255.255

    Thanks in advance.





  3. Re: two interfaces - same network - different subnet mask

    I tried this configuration and it didn't work and an article I think
    explains it. Have you tried before ??
    But you didn't answer my general question...



    "Dmitry Korolyov [MVP]" wrote in message
    news:OH8uAb9qDHA.512@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    Short answer: on Windows 2000, you can have two or more interfaces connected
    to the same physical network and configured within the same subnet.

    --
    Dmitry Korolyov [d__k@removethispart.mail.ru]
    MVP: Windows Server - Active Directory


    "Netmasker" wrote in message
    news:bp6aa6$t4q$1@nic.grnet.gr...
    On a windows 2000 Server I know that I can't have two interfaces belonging
    to the same subnet.

    But what happens if I put the two interfaces in the same network e.g.
    192.168.1.0 but with a different subnet mask for each interface? Will I have
    communication between the two interfaces??

    Probably this is a more general networking question but, can the following
    hosts communicate without a router:
    Host A - IP address: 192.168.1.1 and Subnet mask: 255.255.255.255
    Host B - IP address: 192.168.1.2 and Subnet mask: 255.255.255.255

    Thanks in advance.



  4. Re: two interfaces - same network - different subnet mask

    "Netmasker" wrote in message news:...
    > I tried this configuration and it didn't work and an article I think
    > explains it. Have you tried before ??
    > But you didn't answer my general question...
    >
    >
    >
    > "Dmitry Korolyov [MVP]" wrote in message
    > news:OH8uAb9qDHA.512@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    > Short answer: on Windows 2000, you can have two or more interfaces connected
    > to the same physical network and configured within the same subnet.
    >
    > --
    > Dmitry Korolyov [d__k@removethispart.mail.ru]
    > MVP: Windows Server - Active Directory
    >
    >
    > "Netmasker" wrote in message
    > news:bp6aa6$t4q$1@nic.grnet.gr...
    > On a windows 2000 Server I know that I can't have two interfaces belonging
    > to the same subnet.
    >
    > But what happens if I put the two interfaces in the same network e.g.
    > 192.168.1.0 but with a different subnet mask for each interface? Will I have
    > communication between the two interfaces??
    >
    > Probably this is a more general networking question but, can the following
    > hosts communicate without a router:
    > Host A - IP address: 192.168.1.1 and Subnet mask: 255.255.255.255
    > Host B - IP address: 192.168.1.2 and Subnet mask: 255.255.255.255
    >
    > Thanks in advance.



    If you have hosts on different subnets then you need a router to
    'route' between the subnets.

    The above example would not work as the netmask only provides you with
    one available address per subnet and as a router would need an
    interface on the same subnet there is no address space to do this.

    If you use netmask 255.255.255.252 you will have the following
    addresses:
    Network A - 192.168.1.0
    Host A - 192.168.1.2
    Router port A - 192.168.1.1
    Broadcast address - 192.168.1.3

    Network B - 192.168.1.4
    Host B - 192.168.1.6
    Router port B - 192.168.1.5
    Broadcast address - 192.168.1.7

    You can, of course, sub-divide the address space using different
    subnet masks, for example network A 255.255.255.252 and network B
    255.255.255.240 but you will need to be careful that you don't
    overlap.

    Have a look at this for calculating network masks

    http://www.telusplanet.net/public/sparkman/netcalc.htm

    Brian

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