We use a Win2000 server and all clients are Win2000 Pro. We use
Terminal Services with Remote Desktop Protocol to access our
accounting software. The accounting software is on the server at
Building A and the TS users are at Building B.

We have a 3Com Building-To-Building Bridge setup. Both ends have a
50-foot antenna cable and 18db square panel antenna. The buildings are
less than a quarter of a mile apart on different sides of the same
four-lane highway. There is clear line of site between the two
antennas except for some lines (maybe power, phone, CATV, etc.) on
poles that run down the highway on both sides. The line of site is a
few feet above the lines. I have configured them for 128-bit security.

The wireless system comes with the 3Com Wireless Bridge Manager
software. It has a Remote Signal Strength Indicator. The RSSI
generally shows an average of 74% (min 68, max 78) with occasional
drops to min of 58%. I have no other diagnostic tools that I know of.

The problem is that the TS sessions have a tendency to drop at will
and then take too long to reconnect for the impatient users. Which
then snowballs into multiple TS sessions when the network
reestablishes itself because the users are frantically clicking and
rebooting. No errors are reported in any Event Viewers or the logs in
the Wireless Manager. One or two days a week they have several
dropouts, and other days is 100% uptime. And it does not seem to
correlate with the weather.

My questions are:
What is a GOOD signal strength that I should expect to see?
Is there a relationship between RSSI percentages and data rate (1Mbps
- 11Mbps)?
How can I measure the current data rate?
Is there a tool (inexpensive software) to monitor and record the data
flow across the wireless link?
What might be causing the dropouts?
Would lowering the security to 40-bit or none help?
Would we be better off using a different TS client instead of RDP
(i.e. Terminal Services Client, Client Connection Manager)?
What else am I missing that would be worth knowing or analyzing?

I have tried to ensure good power (UPS on all units) and good solid
connections at all possible points of power, network and antenna
connectors.

Steve