On Nov 20, 4:41*pm, Pete Holsberg wrote:
> Ron K. has written on 11/20/2008 4:28 PM:
>
>
>
> > Q on 11/20/2008 1:33 PM, keyboarded a reply:

>
> >> On Tue, 18 Nov 2008 20:31:52 -0600
> >> Q wrote:

>
> >>> There are ASCII characters which must not be used in URLs or must not
> >>> be used in certain places in URLs. *E.g. the whitespace character
> >>> must not be used in a URL. *This problem is resolved by using those
> >>> ASCII characters's hex encodings, since the % character and the hex
> >>> digits are all ok in URLs.

>
> >> Heh, that's all ok up until the "since the % character and the hex
> >> digits are all ok in URLS" part.

>
> >> To be a lot clearer, the % character is not ok by itself, but it is
> >> ok as the escape character that signals the next two ASCII characters
> >> must be taken as the hex representation of a single character. *(Other
> >> people have explained this, but I felt I should tack it on here as
> >> well.)

>
> >> If a URL needs to have a literal % character, it has to be encoded as
> >> %25.

>
> > The history of using 'Escape' characters goes back farther than PC-DOS 1.0,
> > probably to CPM. *

>
> Further than that! I used escape sequences for terminals with Unix more
> than 20 years ago.


Then some jerk at Microsoft used the Unix escape character as the
filesystem hierarchy separator and life as we now know it began ...