On Nov 19, 9:42*am, Big_Al wrote:
> Virtual Guy wrote:
> > Q wrote:
> >> On Tue, 18 Nov 2008 17:32:50 -0700
> >> Alan wrote:

>
> >>> Ron K. wrote:
> >>> > Virtual Guy on 11/18/2008 5:58 PM, keyboarded a reply: *>> Why does
> >>> FF represent certain HTML symbols or code items as %2F,
> >>> >> or %3D, etc., (example below)

>
> >>> xxx.xxxx.com%2Fwebapp%2Fwcs%2Fstores%2Fservlet%2FP roductDisplay%3FjspStoreDir%3Dhdus%26catalogId

>
> >>> >> ... and how to I determine what they are supposed to be. Is there
> >>> >> a conversion list somewhere?
> >>> > > It's Escape coding where the '%' is the escape code character and
> >>> > the two characters following it are the Hexadecimal numbering of a
> >>> > font character. The %3d represents a '=' and %2f is a '/'. *Any
> >>> > ASCII Character Code table should have the conversion of Hex to
> >>> > font character.

>
> >> Glancing at a table is fine if there are only a couple of decodings to
> >> do, but for more than that I like to use computers. *

>
> >> -- the encoded URL goes in the
> >> middle box.

>
> >>> This answered the second question. What is the answer to the first
> >>> question: Why does FF .....?

>
> >> There are ASCII characters which must not be used in URLs or must not be
> >> used in certain places in URLs. *E.g. the whitespace character must not
> >> be used in a URL. *This problem is resolved by using those ASCII
> >> characters's hex encodings, since the % character and the hex digits
> >> are all ok in URLs.

>
> >> The simplest case is if I need to link to a file but the filename has a
> >> whitespace in it.

>
> >> Not valid URL syntax:
> >>http://www.example.com/afile.ext

>
> >> Valid URL syntax:
> >>http://www.example.com/a%20file

>
> > Why is each ASCII character preceeded by % (percent)? *Example http:// =
> > %3A%2F%2F ? *Is is just a separator or a mark that ASCII will follow?

>
> > Thanks

>
> > VG

>
> You must have missed Ron K's message.
> The % is what is called an escape character. * You 'escape' reality and
> go into hex values. *For lack of a better layman's explanation.


So may I ask a third question...

Is there some plug-in that converts these codes back to ASCII when
saving files for example? I don't like having files called foo%20bar
and often spend a long time prettying up file names as I save them.