Firefox 3 misinterpreting content (special characters) - Mozilla

This is a discussion on Firefox 3 misinterpreting content (special characters) - Mozilla ; Just an example of the kind of thing that makes me use FF3 only grudgingly (as FF2 support will end some day). I have these characters in my page content: http://xoap&prod=xoap FF3 interprets the string &prod as ∏ (mathematical "product" ...

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Thread: Firefox 3 misinterpreting content (special characters)

  1. Firefox 3 misinterpreting content (special characters)

    Just an example of the kind of thing that makes me use FF3 only
    grudgingly (as FF2 support will end some day).

    I have these characters in my page content:

    http://xoap&prod=xoap

    FF3 interprets the string &prod as ∏ (mathematical "product"
    character - looks like the Greek letter Pi - or a staple).

    IE does not, Opera does not, and neither should they. A semicolon is
    required for it to be an HTML special character.

    --
    *****************************
    Chuck Anderson • Boulder, CO
    http://www.CycleTourist.com
    Nothing he's got he really needs
    Twenty first century schizoid man.
    ***********************************


  2. Re: Firefox 3 misinterpreting content (special characters)

    On Thu, 09 Oct 2008 15:19:29 -0600
    Chuck Anderson wrote:

    > Just an example of the kind of thing that makes me use FF3 only
    > grudgingly (as FF2 support will end some day).
    >
    > I have these characters in my page content:
    >
    > http://xoap&prod=xoap
    >
    > FF3 interprets the string &prod as ∏ (mathematical "product"
    > character - looks like the Greek letter Pi - or a staple).
    >
    > IE does not, Opera does not, and neither should they. A semicolon is
    > required for it to be an HTML special character.


    The semicolon isn't necessarily required for a character entity
    reference, but the HTML 4 documentation recommends it. It also
    recommends using "&" instead of "&", which would solve your problem.

  3. Re: Firefox 3 misinterpreting content (special characters)

    Q on 10/9/2008 5:47 PM, keyboarded a reply:
    > On Thu, 09 Oct 2008 15:19:29 -0600
    > Chuck Anderson wrote:
    >
    >> Just an example of the kind of thing that makes me use FF3 only
    >> grudgingly (as FF2 support will end some day).
    >>
    >> I have these characters in my page content:
    >>
    >> http://xoap&prod=xoap
    >>
    >> FF3 interprets the string &prod as ∏ (mathematical "product"
    >> character - looks like the Greek letter Pi - or a staple).
    >>
    >> IE does not, Opera does not, and neither should they. A semicolon is
    >> required for it to be an HTML special character.

    >
    > The semicolon isn't necessarily required for a character entity
    > reference, but the HTML 4 documentation recommends it. It also
    > recommends using "&" instead of "&", which would solve your problem.


    Would the % escape method also work in this case?

    --
    Ron K.
    Who is General Failure, and why is he searching my HDD?
    Kernel Restore reported Major Error used BSOD to msg the enemy!

  4. Re: Firefox 3 misinterpreting content (special characters)

    Ron K. wrote:
    > Q on 10/9/2008 5:47 PM, keyboarded a reply:
    >
    >> On Thu, 09 Oct 2008 15:19:29 -0600
    >> Chuck Anderson wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> Just an example of the kind of thing that makes me use FF3 only
    >>> grudgingly (as FF2 support will end some day).
    >>>
    >>> I have these characters in my page content:
    >>>
    >>> http://xoap&prod=xoap
    >>>
    >>> FF3 interprets the string &prod as ∏ (mathematical "product"
    >>> character - looks like the Greek letter Pi - or a staple).
    >>>
    >>> IE does not, Opera does not, and neither should they. A semicolon is
    >>> required for it to be an HTML special character.
    >>>

    >> The semicolon isn't necessarily required for a character entity
    >> reference, but the HTML 4 documentation recommends it. It also
    >> recommends using "&" instead of "&", which would solve your problem.
    >>

    >
    > Would the % escape method also work in this case?
    >
    >


    Well ..... it's part of a URL that I have pasted into a text field - in
    a form that I use to enter memos and tidbits into a phone book-like
    database ... so I don't massage the data.


    --
    *****************************
    Chuck Anderson Boulder, CO
    http://www.CycleTourist.com
    Nothing he's got he really needs
    Twenty first century schizoid man.
    ***********************************


  5. Re: Firefox 3 misinterpreting content (special characters)

    On Thu, 09 Oct 2008 19:03:21 -0400
    "Ron K." wrote:

    > »Q« on 10/9/2008 5:47 PM, keyboarded a reply:
    > > On Thu, 09 Oct 2008 15:19:29 -0600
    > > Chuck Anderson wrote:
    > >
    > >> Just an example of the kind of thing that makes me use FF3 only
    > >> grudgingly (as FF2 support will end some day).
    > >>
    > >> I have these characters in my page content:
    > >>
    > >> http://xoap&prod=xoap
    > >>
    > >> FF3 interprets the string &prod as ∏ (mathematical "product"
    > >> character - looks like the Greek letter Pi - or a staple).
    > >>
    > >> IE does not, Opera does not, and neither should they. A semicolon
    > >> is required for it to be an HTML special character.

    > >
    > > The semicolon isn't necessarily required for a character entity
    > > reference, but the HTML 4 documentation recommends it.


    I should have added that I don't actually know when the semicolon is
    required and when it's not, only that the HTML documentation says it's
    not always required. So I don't know whether Fx 3 is doing the right
    thing in this case or not. The details are somewhere in the SGML
    specs, which I'm not about to try to read.

    > > It also recommends using "&" instead of "&", which would solve
    > > your problem.

    >
    > Would the % escape method also work in this case?


    I don't think so. That's for encoding characters in a URL, whereas
    Chuck was talking about how characters are rendered in the body of an
    HTML doc.

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