Is There a Manual - Mozilla

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  1. Is There a Manual

    So one can set up Thunderbird the way s/he wants to?

    I try to put only what is absolutely necessary &/or only my OS in sector
    C:\.

    I'd like to know how to put everything including mail, messages, filters,
    etc. in sector D:\ or in the subdirectory I put Thurnderbird in.

    Thank you.

    Jim



  2. Re: Is There a Manual

    James M. Haviland wrote:
    > So one can set up Thunderbird the way s/he wants to?
    >
    > I try to put only what is absolutely necessary &/or only my OS in sector
    > C:\.
    >
    > I'd like to know how to put everything including mail, messages, filters,
    > etc. in sector D:\ or in the subdirectory I put Thurnderbird in.
    >
    > Thank you.
    >
    > Jim
    >

    Everything you need to know about the profile folder, where
    Thunderbird (and Firefox, etc.) stores the data files (including
    mail, messages, filters, etc.) can be found in the Mozillazine
    knowledgebase:
    http://kb.mozillazine.org/Category:Profiles

    You will need to do custom installs for both the program files
    and the profile files to get them to install in something other
    than the default locations. DON'T INSTALL both the program files
    and the profile folder in the same directory or subdirectory
    because an upgrade to the program will wipe the
    directory/subdirectory which would include the profile
    information:
    http://kb.mozillazine.org/Keep_it_working_(Thunderbird)




  3. Re: Is There a Manual

    On 8/12/2008 8:21 AM, James M. Haviland wrote:
    > So one can set up Thunderbird the way s/he wants to?
    >
    > I try to put only what is absolutely necessary &/or only my OS in sector
    > C:\.
    >
    > I'd like to know how to put everything including mail, messages, filters,
    > etc. in sector D:\ or in the subdirectory I put Thurnderbird in.
    >
    > Thank you.
    >
    > Jim
    >
    >


    If you're looking for a user manual or built-in help information, forget
    it. See bug #273997 at
    .

    This bug is almost four years old. While bells and whistles are being
    implemented in Thunderbird, I see no activity on this bug. Yes, bells
    and whistles are more interesting; but this bug would go a long way
    towards creating a dedicated user base.

    --
    David E. Ross


    Go to Mozdev at for quick access to
    extensions for Firefox, Thunderbird, SeaMonkey, and other
    Mozilla-related applications. You can access Mozdev much
    more quickly than you can Mozilla Add-Ons.

  4. Re: Is There a Manual

    James M. Haviland wrote:
    > So one can set up Thunderbird the way s/he wants to?
    >
    > I try to put only what is absolutely necessary &/or only my OS in
    > sector C:\.
    >
    > I'd like to know how to put everything including mail, messages,
    > filters, etc. in sector D:\ or in the subdirectory I put Thurnderbird in.

    Just a word: There is no sector C:\ nor D:\. Those are drive letters and
    root directories...
    --
    Andrew DeFaria
    Department of Redundancy Department


  5. Re: Is There a Manual

    On 13.08.2008 06:39, CET - what odd quirk of fate caused Andrew DeFaria
    to generate the following:? :
    > James M. Haviland wrote:
    >> So one can set up Thunderbird the way s/he wants to?
    >>
    >> I try to put only what is absolutely necessary &/or only my OS in
    >> sector C:\.
    >>
    >> I'd like to know how to put everything including mail, messages,
    >> filters, etc. in sector D:\ or in the subdirectory I put
    >> Thurnderbird in.

    > Just a word: There is no sector C:\ nor D:\. Those are drive letters
    > and root directories...
    > --
    > Andrew DeFaria
    > Department of Redundancy Department


    or, to be more particular (on DOS-based systems) they are called Partitions.
    As Andrew says, each partition is given a "drive" letter A-Z - which is
    why they are most often called "drives". A single hard disk can have up
    to 26 Partitions (= drives), starting with C (A and B are reserved for
    Floppy Disk drives).
    If there are two or more HD's, the drive letters alternate between them,
    where C will be on the primary drive, D on the secondary (slave) etc.
    unless manually force-adjusted,

    You will see therefore, that it is important to learn (and use) the
    correct descriptions, otherwise you may well get wrong answers, as the
    person replying may be thinking of something completely different to
    what you mean!

    reg

  6. Re: Is There a Manual - urgghhhhh

    On 13.08.2008 12:43, CET - what odd quirk of fate caused squaredancer
    to generate the following:? :
    > On 13.08.2008 06:39, CET - what odd quirk of fate caused Andrew DeFaria
    > to generate the following:? :
    >
    >> James M. Haviland wrote:
    >>
    >>> So one can set up Thunderbird the way s/he wants to?
    >>>
    >>> I try to put only what is absolutely necessary &/or only my OS in
    >>> sector C:\.
    >>>
    >>> I'd like to know how to put everything including mail, messages,
    >>> filters, etc. in sector D:\ or in the subdirectory I put
    >>> Thurnderbird in.
    >>>

    >> Just a word: There is no sector C:\ nor D:\. Those are drive letters
    >> and root directories...
    >> --
    >> Andrew DeFaria
    >> Department of Redundancy Department
    >>

    >
    > or, to be more particular (on DOS-based systems) they are called Partitions.
    > As Andrew says, each partition is given a "drive" letter A-Z - which is

    urgghhhhh.... each partition is given a "drive" letter C-Z


    >
    > why they are most often called "drives". A single hard disk can have up
    > to 26 Partitions (= drives), starting with C (A and B are reserved for
    >

    umm^^ 24, of course..... C-Z


    > Floppy Disk drives).
    > If there are two or more HD's, the drive letters alternate between them,
    > where C will be on the primary drive, D on the secondary (slave) etc.
    > unless manually force-adjusted,
    >
    > You will see therefore, that it is important to learn (and use) the
    > correct descriptions, otherwise you may well get wrong answers, as the
    > person replying may be thinking of something completely different to
    > what you mean!
    >
    > reg
    >


    which proves the point....
    think, write, read, correct, read, correct, read, post

    reg

  7. Re: Is There a Manual

    squaredancer wrote:
    > You will see therefore, that it is important to learn (and use) the
    > correct descriptions, otherwise you may well get wrong answers, as the
    > person replying may be thinking of something completely different to
    > what you mean!

    Right. It never ceases to amaze me the effort the typically self
    proclaimed lazy people make in inventing new terms and descriptions to
    illy define their problems instead of simply using the terminology that
    is presented them! Quite amazing!
    --
    Andrew DeFaria
    Give me ambiguity or give me something else.


  8. Re: Is There a Manual - urgghhhhh

    squaredancer wrote:
    > On 13.08.2008 12:43, CET - what odd quirk of fate caused squaredancer
    > to generate the following:? :
    >> On 13.08.2008 06:39, CET - what odd quirk of fate caused Andrew DeFaria
    >> to generate the following:? :
    >>
    >>> James M. Haviland wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> So one can set up Thunderbird the way s/he wants to?
    >>>>
    >>>> I try to put only what is absolutely necessary &/or only my OS in
    >>>> sector C:\.
    >>>>
    >>>> I'd like to know how to put everything including mail, messages,
    >>>> filters, etc. in sector D:\ or in the subdirectory I put
    >>>> Thurnderbird in.
    >>>>
    >>> Just a word: There is no sector C:\ nor D:\. Those are drive letters
    >>> and root directories...
    >>> --
    >>> Andrew DeFaria
    >>> Department of Redundancy Department
    >>>

    >> or, to be more particular (on DOS-based systems) they are called Partitions.
    >> As Andrew says, each partition is given a "drive" letter A-Z - which is

    > urgghhhhh.... each partition is given a "drive" letter C-Z
    >
    >
    >>
    >> why they are most often called "drives". A single hard disk can have up
    >> to 26 Partitions (= drives), starting with C (A and B are reserved for
    >>

    > umm^^ 24, of course..... C-Z
    >
    >
    >> Floppy Disk drives).
    >> If there are two or more HD's, the drive letters alternate between them,
    >> where C will be on the primary drive, D on the secondary (slave) etc.
    >> unless manually force-adjusted,
    >>
    >> You will see therefore, that it is important to learn (and use) the
    >> correct descriptions, otherwise you may well get wrong answers, as the
    >> person replying may be thinking of something completely different to
    >> what you mean!
    >>
    >> reg
    >>

    >
    > which proves the point....
    > think, write, read, correct, read, correct, read, post
    >
    > reg


    Most of us just read,post. Apologize. Grin.

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