send a link... and how long is it valid - Mozilla

This is a discussion on send a link... and how long is it valid - Mozilla ; jg wrote: > On 4/18/2006 9:20 AM NM Public scribbled: > > >>jg wrote: >> >>>Why would one want to send a web page to wiki? Is that how some post there? >> >>I use my wiki as a place ...

+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 21 to 34 of 34

Thread: send a link... and how long is it valid

  1. Re: drifting OT Re: send a link... and how long is it valid

    jg wrote:

    > On 4/18/2006 9:20 AM NM Public scribbled:
    >
    >
    >>jg wrote:
    >>
    >>>Why would one want to send a web page to wiki? Is that how some post there?

    >>
    >>I use my wiki as a place to store notes, ideas, web pages, etc.
    >>that are about things that I'm researching and that I will maybe
    >>eventually write about on one of my public web sites. Lots of web
    >>pages disappear so I like to keep my own personal archive of
    >>useful web pages. Now that disk space is virtually free, it's
    >>very easy to do this. For example, my viaVerio Signature Hosting
    >>account, which just a few years ago included 25 MB of space, now
    >>includes 10 Gigabytes (10,240,000 MB) of space.

    >
    >
    > So you prefer storing that data on the web rather than your own HD...
    > aren't you concerned about security of that data, in this day and age?
    >

    my sig file says it all

    --
    Want to download the entire internet? Well believe it or not, you can
    and you can do it from here: http://www.w3schools.com/downloadwww.htm.
    Just make sure you have enough disk space.

  2. Re: drifting OT Re: send a link... and how long is it valid

    jg wrote:

    > On 4/18/2006 11:08 AM gwtc scribbled:
    >
    >
    >>jg wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>I can see what you are saying about a webpage. If i had the need to do
    >>>so, I would send it as a file.
    >>>I don't understand the concept of legality of sending pages - isn't a
    >>>web page accessible to the public considered to be in the public domain,
    >>>somewhat like a newspaper?
    >>>

    >>
    >>that is false. All web pages are copyrighted, whether they're
    >>registered or not. A newspaper is NOT in the public domain either,
    >>its copyrighted material.
    >>

    >
    > yabbut, I never saw/heard of anyone get in trouble for clipping articles
    > and senting them to friends and relatives.


    thats different. You're only clipping and sending. But if you use it
    as your own, then thats illegal.

    --
    Want to download the entire internet? Well believe it or not, you can
    and you can do it from here: http://www.w3schools.com/downloadwww.htm.
    Just make sure you have enough disk space.

  3. Re: drifting OT Re: send a link... and how long is it valid

    Moz Champion (Dan) wrote:

    > Moz Champion (Dan) wrote:
    >
    >>PeterInMn wrote:
    >>
    >>>Moz Champion (Dan) wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>PeterInMn wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>jg wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>On 4/18/2006 11:08 AM gwtc scribbled:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>>jg wrote:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>I can see what you are saying about a webpage. If i had the need
    >>>>>>>>to do
    >>>>>>>>so, I would send it as a file.
    >>>>>>>>I don't understand the concept of legality of sending pages -
    >>>>>>>>isn't a
    >>>>>>>>web page accessible to the public considered to be in the public
    >>>>>>>>domain,
    >>>>>>>>somewhat like a newspaper?
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>that is false. All web pages are copyrighted, whether they're
    >>>>>>>registered or not. A newspaper is NOT in the public domain
    >>>>>>>either, its copyrighted material.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>yabbut, I never saw/heard of anyone get in trouble for clipping
    >>>>>>articles
    >>>>>>and senting them to friends and relatives.
    >>>>>>I was thinking of the social side of email and I guess the OP had
    >>>>>>something more/else in mind. The Creative Commons license mention
    >>>>>>later
    >>>>>>tipped me off.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>JG,
    >>>>>I'll pick up where you originally left off. I think it is pretty
    >>>>>Okay to send pages as email without fear of legal reprisals, but I
    >>>>>think strictly technically, it could be illegal to reproduce
    >>>>>PUBLICLY copyrighted material. By publicly, I mean for wide
    >>>>>dissemination. I know copyright law allows portions of text to be
    >>>>>reproduced for scholarly work, but I do not think it allows whole
    >>>>>articles to be reproduced and copied multiple times for others to
    >>>>>see. Maybe this is why Nancy means as long as the article or page
    >>>>>show up in your email repository (?), it is Okay to send web pages.
    >>>>>I am sorry if I seem to making a big deal of this, but I have two
    >>>>>concerns: 1. Trying to be adherent to the law in a reasonable
    >>>>>manner, and 2, trying to preserve others intellectual creations in
    >>>>>fairness (such as music or lyric copyrights). As regards the
    >>>>>newspapers, I think it is fair to send their email pages around, as
    >>>>>they have advertisements supporting their work, and ultimately get
    >>>>>credit with fame and fortune for good and enriching articles, vis a
    >>>>>vie, more viewers to their newspapers. When the attorneys get
    >>>>>involved, all common sense goes out the window!
    >>>>>Yours, maybe a little less stupid,
    >>>>>Peter
    >>>>
    >>>>All work on web pages is protected. If you copy material, then you
    >>>>MAY be liable for copyright and/or intellectual property lawsuits.
    >>>>"Fair Use" doctrine still applies, but is generally more restrictive
    >>>>than most people think.
    >>>>
    >>>>Claiming that an article 'shows up' in your email, and is therefore
    >>>>'free' to copy is nonsense.
    >>>>If I photocopied an entire book and sent it to you, I am still
    >>>>breaking the law, and you still have no right to distribute it. Two
    >>>>wrongs dont make a right.
    >>>>
    >>>>Any person, or organization that puts up a web site 'invested' their
    >>>>time and effort into it. By copying it verbatim, you are in effect
    >>>>'stealing' their work. If they give you permission, then all is
    >>>>well, but you have to ask first.
    >>>>
    >>>>Web pages change, and so do links. Of course, thats the intent of
    >>>>the design. Claiming that you send web pages because the links may
    >>>>go out of date is nonsense. Thats like claiming you can photocopy a
    >>>>book in its entirety because it may go 'out of print' or is 'out of
    >>>>print'.
    >>>
    >>>Great. But then the issue, and legal matter is, what is fair use. So,
    >>>you agree that some sending of some copyrighted material is
    >>>permissible, yes? I don't think forwarding of portions of newspaper
    >>>article is forbidden, but maybe the whole article is, but I doubt it.
    >>>I would agree there may be problems with hard copying and reproducing
    >>>hundreds of copies of a web page and distributing them to a group
    >>>meeting, but I do not think it is forbidden to send one copy to a
    >>>friend or relative to point some interesting thing out to them.
    >>>Yours,
    >>>In legal quandries,
    >>>Peter

    >>
    >>Better minds than mine have considered the question
    >>http://www.utsystem.edu/OGC/intellec...y/copypol2.htm
    >>
    >>The original 'fair use' as regards to copyrighted material
    >>http://www.copyright.gov/fls/fl102.html
    >>

    >
    > From http://www.copyright.gov/fls/fl102.html
    >
    > The distinction between “fair use” and infringement may be unclear and
    > not easily defined. There is no specific number of words, lines, or
    > notes that may safely be taken without permission. Acknowledging the
    > source of the copyrighted material does not substitute for obtaining
    > permission.
    >
    > Obtain permission, and all is well.

    you can download entire websites to your hard drive with no problems.
    As long as its for personal use. No permission needed. However,
    the moment you copy things and put them in your email or on your
    website then it becomes illegal. Its the same with books, etc. You
    can photocopy the entire book with no recourse. But the moment you
    give it to someone else, with or without compensation, then it becomes
    illegal.

    --
    Want to download the entire internet? Well believe it or not, you can
    and you can do it from here: http://www.w3schools.com/downloadwww.htm.
    Just make sure you have enough disk space.

  4. Re: drifting OT Re: send a link... and how long is it valid

    On 19.04.2006 04:41, CET - what odd quirk of fate caused PeterInMn to
    generate the following:? :

    > jg wrote:
    >
    >> On 4/18/2006 11:08 AM gwtc scribbled:
    >>
    >>> jg wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I can see what you are saying about a webpage. If i had the need
    >>>> to do
    >>>> so, I would send it as a file.
    >>>> I don't understand the concept of legality of sending pages - isn't a
    >>>> web page accessible to the public considered to be in the public
    >>>> domain,
    >>>> somewhat like a newspaper?
    >>>>
    >>> that is false. All web pages are copyrighted, whether they're
    >>> registered or not. A newspaper is NOT in the public domain either,
    >>> its copyrighted material.
    >>>

    >> yabbut, I never saw/heard of anyone get in trouble for clipping articles
    >> and senting them to friends and relatives.
    >> I was thinking of the social side of email and I guess the OP had
    >> something more/else in mind. The Creative Commons license mention later
    >> tipped me off.

    >
    > JG,
    > I'll pick up where you originally left off. I think it is pretty Okay
    > to send pages as email without fear of legal reprisals, but I think
    > strictly technically, it could be illegal to reproduce PUBLICLY
    > copyrighted material. By publicly, I mean for wide dissemination. I
    > know copyright law allows portions of text to be reproduced for
    > scholarly work, but I do not think it allows whole articles to be
    > reproduced and copied multiple times for others to see. Maybe this is
    > why Nancy means as long as the article or page show up in your email
    > repository (?), it is Okay to send web pages. I am sorry if I seem to
    > making a big deal of this, but I have two concerns: 1. Trying to be
    > adherent to the law in a reasonable manner, and 2, trying to preserve
    > others intellectual creations in fairness (such as music or lyric
    > copyrights). As regards the newspapers, I think it is fair to send
    > their email pages around, as they have advertisements supporting their
    > work, and ultimately get credit with fame and fortune for good and
    > enriching articles, vis a vie, more viewers to their newspapers. When
    > the attorneys get involved, all common sense goes out the window!
    > Yours, maybe a little less stupid,
    > Peter


    Author to person writing a book critique:
    "... and what part of the book did you like best?"

    Critique's answer:

    "The Copyright section - *no part of this publication may be reproduced,
    stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any
    means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise,
    without the prior permission of the publisher* "

    Copyright notice taken from "The Lord of the Rings" (three volumn issue)
    You will find this limitation (be it good or bad *lol* ) in most
    copyrighted publications - I don't know whether it is part of the Law??
    Probably!

    Apart from that, *anything* that is "taken" from another source is
    liable to copyright and/or personal rights and may *NOT* be *PUBLICALLY*
    reproduced! That includes copyrighted music on "your" website (you are
    publishing music on the web), Webpages included into "your" website
    (without appropiate permission) - even playing a CD in your
    celler-barroom when several guests are present constitutes a breach of
    copyright!
    Theoretically, it is also possible to be charged with "public
    broadcasting" if you play your car- or home radio so loudly, that it can
    be heard "outside a reasonable distance" (usually described as "room
    audibillity").

    If you want to refer to a certain website, provide a linked URL - but
    *do not forget* the disclaimer, that you are not responsible for, and
    distance yourself from, the contents of the linked site. This of course,
    includes any *further links* that are on the URL that you linked to...
    who knows where "they" go to??

    Photocopying books for distribution is one of the main critique areas in
    the education system, here in Germany! The "School book publishers"
    give the teachers *one copy* of working material. If further copies are
    required, they must be *purchased*. No quick copies and give them to
    the kids.... naughty, naughty, slapped fingers!

    reg

  5. Re: send a link... and how long is it valid

    Chris Ilias wrote:
    > _PeterInMn_ spoke thusly on 18/04/2006 8:05 AM:
    >> bandwidth aside, the web changes too fast for a simple link to be
    >> sent. For example, a link to the front page of any web newspaper will
    >> change by the next morning, right?

    >
    > I can't think of one news site that doesn't provide permanent links to
    > each news item.


    Humm. Local newspaper sites usually don't keep their stories online
    with the same URL for more than a day or two. Many other sites replace
    stories when a new one on the same subject comes in. Even Yahoo and
    Excite often have stories disappear in a few days.


  6. Re: drifting OT Re: send a link... and how long is it valid

    squaredancer wrote:
    > On 19.04.2006 04:41, CET - what odd quirk of fate caused PeterInMn to
    > generate the following:? :
    >
    >> jg wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 4/18/2006 11:08 AM gwtc scribbled:
    >>>
    >>>> jg wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> I can see what you are saying about a webpage. If i had the need
    >>>>> to do
    >>>>> so, I would send it as a file.
    >>>>> I don't understand the concept of legality of sending pages - isn't a
    >>>>> web page accessible to the public considered to be in the public
    >>>>> domain,
    >>>>> somewhat like a newspaper?
    >>>>>
    >>>> that is false. All web pages are copyrighted, whether they're
    >>>> registered or not. A newspaper is NOT in the public domain either,
    >>>> its copyrighted material.
    >>>>
    >>> yabbut, I never saw/heard of anyone get in trouble for clipping articles
    >>> and senting them to friends and relatives.
    >>> I was thinking of the social side of email and I guess the OP had
    >>> something more/else in mind. The Creative Commons license mention later
    >>> tipped me off.

    >>
    >> JG,
    >> I'll pick up where you originally left off. I think it is pretty Okay
    >> to send pages as email without fear of legal reprisals, but I think
    >> strictly technically, it could be illegal to reproduce PUBLICLY
    >> copyrighted material. By publicly, I mean for wide dissemination. I
    >> know copyright law allows portions of text to be reproduced for
    >> scholarly work, but I do not think it allows whole articles to be
    >> reproduced and copied multiple times for others to see. Maybe this is
    >> why Nancy means as long as the article or page show up in your email
    >> repository (?), it is Okay to send web pages. I am sorry if I seem to
    >> making a big deal of this, but I have two concerns: 1. Trying to be
    >> adherent to the law in a reasonable manner, and 2, trying to preserve
    >> others intellectual creations in fairness (such as music or lyric
    >> copyrights). As regards the newspapers, I think it is fair to send
    >> their email pages around, as they have advertisements supporting their
    >> work, and ultimately get credit with fame and fortune for good and
    >> enriching articles, vis a vie, more viewers to their newspapers. When
    >> the attorneys get involved, all common sense goes out the window!
    >> Yours, maybe a little less stupid,
    >> Peter

    >
    > Author to person writing a book critique:
    > "... and what part of the book did you like best?"
    >
    > Critique's answer:
    >
    > "The Copyright section - *no part of this publication may be reproduced,
    > stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any
    > means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise,
    > without the prior permission of the publisher* "
    > Copyright notice taken from "The Lord of the Rings" (three volumn issue)
    > You will find this limitation (be it good or bad *lol* ) in most
    > copyrighted publications - I don't know whether it is part of the Law??
    > Probably!
    >
    > Apart from that, *anything* that is "taken" from another source is
    > liable to copyright and/or personal rights and may *NOT* be *PUBLICALLY*
    > reproduced! That includes copyrighted music on "your" website (you are
    > publishing music on the web), Webpages included into "your" website
    > (without appropiate permission) - even playing a CD in your
    > celler-barroom when several guests are present constitutes a breach of
    > copyright! Theoretically, it is also possible to be charged with "public
    > broadcasting" if you play your car- or home radio so loudly, that it can
    > be heard "outside a reasonable distance" (usually described as "room
    > audibillity").
    >
    > If you want to refer to a certain website, provide a linked URL - but
    > *do not forget* the disclaimer, that you are not responsible for, and
    > distance yourself from, the contents of the linked site. This of course,
    > includes any *further links* that are on the URL that you linked to...
    > who knows where "they" go to??
    >
    > Photocopying books for distribution is one of the main critique areas in
    > the education system, here in Germany! The "School book publishers"
    > give the teachers *one copy* of working material. If further copies are
    > required, they must be *purchased*. No quick copies and give them to
    > the kids.... naughty, naughty, slapped fingers!
    >
    > reg


    Oh, GREAT! Now I can call the police on the idiot who likes to drive
    very slowly down the street with his car stereo turned up to warp 9.5
    and 15 inch bass speakers with bass boost turned all the way up, and
    rattling my windows and making my stomach ripple. Probably better than
    shotgunning the idiot's speakers.... But then I am sure he never heard
    of 'copyright', and is probably playing the music from a CD he ripped
    from a friend's copay anyway.


  7. Re: drifting OT Re: send a link... and how long is it valid

    On 19.04.2006 10:18, CET - what odd quirk of fate caused Ron Hunter to
    generate the following:? :

    > squaredancer wrote:
    >
    >> On 19.04.2006 04:41, CET - what odd quirk of fate caused PeterInMn
    >> to generate the following:? :
    >>
    >>> jg wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On 4/18/2006 11:08 AM gwtc scribbled:
    >>>>
    >>>>> jg wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> I can see what you are saying about a webpage. If i had the need
    >>>>>> to do
    >>>>>> so, I would send it as a file.
    >>>>>> I don't understand the concept of legality of sending pages -
    >>>>>> isn't a
    >>>>>> web page accessible to the public considered to be in the public
    >>>>>> domain,
    >>>>>> somewhat like a newspaper?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>> that is false. All web pages are copyrighted, whether they're
    >>>>> registered or not. A newspaper is NOT in the public domain
    >>>>> either, its copyrighted material.
    >>>>>
    >>>> yabbut, I never saw/heard of anyone get in trouble for clipping
    >>>> articles
    >>>> and senting them to friends and relatives.
    >>>> I was thinking of the social side of email and I guess the OP had
    >>>> something more/else in mind. The Creative Commons license mention
    >>>> later
    >>>> tipped me off.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> JG,
    >>> I'll pick up where you originally left off. I think it is pretty
    >>> Okay to send pages as email without fear of legal reprisals, but I
    >>> think strictly technically, it could be illegal to reproduce
    >>> PUBLICLY copyrighted material. By publicly, I mean for wide
    >>> dissemination. I know copyright law allows portions of text to be
    >>> reproduced for scholarly work, but I do not think it allows whole
    >>> articles to be reproduced and copied multiple times for others to
    >>> see. Maybe this is why Nancy means as long as the article or page
    >>> show up in your email repository (?), it is Okay to send web pages.
    >>> I am sorry if I seem to making a big deal of this, but I have two
    >>> concerns: 1. Trying to be adherent to the law in a reasonable
    >>> manner, and 2, trying to preserve others intellectual creations in
    >>> fairness (such as music or lyric copyrights). As regards the
    >>> newspapers, I think it is fair to send their email pages around, as
    >>> they have advertisements supporting their work, and ultimately get
    >>> credit with fame and fortune for good and enriching articles, vis a
    >>> vie, more viewers to their newspapers. When the attorneys get
    >>> involved, all common sense goes out the window!
    >>> Yours, maybe a little less stupid,
    >>> Peter

    >>
    >>
    >> Author to person writing a book critique:
    >> "... and what part of the book did you like best?"
    >>
    >> Critique's answer:
    >>
    >> "The Copyright section - *no part of this publication may be
    >> reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form
    >> or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or
    >> otherwise, without the prior permission of the publisher* "
    >> Copyright notice taken from "The Lord of the Rings" (three volumn
    >> issue) You will find this limitation (be it good or bad *lol* ) in
    >> most copyrighted publications - I don't know whether it is part of
    >> the Law?? Probably!
    >>
    >> Apart from that, *anything* that is "taken" from another source is
    >> liable to copyright and/or personal rights and may *NOT* be
    >> *PUBLICALLY* reproduced! That includes copyrighted music on "your"
    >> website (you are publishing music on the web), Webpages included into
    >> "your" website (without appropiate permission) - even playing a CD in
    >> your celler-barroom when several guests are present constitutes a
    >> breach of copyright! Theoretically, it is also possible to be charged
    >> with "public broadcasting" if you play your car- or home radio so
    >> loudly, that it can be heard "outside a reasonable distance" (usually
    >> described as "room audibillity").
    >>
    >> If you want to refer to a certain website, provide a linked URL - but
    >> *do not forget* the disclaimer, that you are not responsible for, and
    >> distance yourself from, the contents of the linked site. This of
    >> course, includes any *further links* that are on the URL that you
    >> linked to... who knows where "they" go to??
    >>
    >> Photocopying books for distribution is one of the main critique areas
    >> in the education system, here in Germany! The "School book
    >> publishers" give the teachers *one copy* of working material. If
    >> further copies are required, they must be *purchased*. No quick
    >> copies and give them to the kids.... naughty, naughty, slapped
    >> fingers!
    >>
    >> reg

    >
    >
    > Oh, GREAT! Now I can call the police on the idiot who likes to drive
    > very slowly down the street with his car stereo turned up to warp 9.5
    > and 15 inch bass speakers with bass boost turned all the way up, and
    > rattling my windows and making my stomach ripple. Probably better
    > than shotgunning the idiot's speakers.... But then I am sure he never
    > heard of 'copyright', and is probably playing the music from a CD he
    > ripped from a friend's copay anyway.
    >

    dunno if the police would be interested! It is the company responsible
    for "Original author's rights" - in Germany, that is called GEMA. I
    think that the US has two companies - you need to ask any musician or
    singer....I know that Squaredance Callers have to be covered by both
    companies, to be able to call at open dances!

    Just send them the registration number and (if you recognise it) the
    tune... see what happens!

    reg

  8. Re: send a link... and how long is it valid

    On 19.04.2006 10:13, CET - what odd quirk of fate caused Ron Hunter to
    generate the following:? :

    > Chris Ilias wrote:
    >
    >> _PeterInMn_ spoke thusly on 18/04/2006 8:05 AM:
    >>
    >>> bandwidth aside, the web changes too fast for a simple link to be
    >>> sent. For example, a link to the front page of any web newspaper
    >>> will change by the next morning, right?

    >>
    >>
    >> I can't think of one news site that doesn't provide permanent links
    >> to each news item.

    >
    >
    > Humm. Local newspaper sites usually don't keep their stories online
    > with the same URL for more than a day or two. Many other sites
    > replace stories when a new one on the same subject comes in. Even
    > Yahoo and Excite often have stories disappear in a few days.
    >

    *lol*

    *NOTHING* is older than this morning's news...

    reg

  9. Re: drifting OT Re: send a link... and how long is it valid

    jg wrote:
    > On 4/18/2006 9:20 AM NM Public scribbled:
    >
    >> jg wrote:
    >>> Why would one want to send a web page to wiki? Is that how some post there?

    >>
    >> I use my wiki as a place to store notes, ideas, web pages, etc.
    >> that are about things that I'm researching [...]

    >
    > So you prefer storing that data on the web rather than your own HD...
    > aren't you concerned about security of that data, in this day and age?


    Yes I'm concerned about security, but I'm more interested in
    being able to work from anywhere. That's why I use hosted IMAP
    for my email and hosted web sites for all my writing, note
    taking, bookmarks, to-do lists, etc. Being able to work from
    anywhere and not being locked in to any system is a big part of
    what some people call "Web 2.0." Once you've lost a hard disk or
    spent a lot of time traveling without your own computer, you too
    will appreciate this way of computing!

    Nancy
    Infinite Ink:
    Deflexion & Reflexion:

    --
    Sent with SeaMonkey Suite

  10. Re: drifting OT Re: send a link... and how long is it valid

    NM Public wrote:
    > jg wrote:
    >> On 4/18/2006 9:20 AM NM Public scribbled:
    >>
    >>> jg wrote:
    >>>> Why would one want to send a web page to wiki? Is that how some
    >>>> post there?
    >>>
    >>> I use my wiki as a place to store notes, ideas, web pages, etc. that
    >>> are about things that I'm researching [...]

    >>
    >> So you prefer storing that data on the web rather than your own HD...
    >> aren't you concerned about security of that data, in this day and age?

    >
    > Yes I'm concerned about security, but I'm more interested in being able
    > to work from anywhere. That's why I use hosted IMAP for my email and
    > hosted web sites for all my writing, note taking, bookmarks, to-do
    > lists, etc. Being able to work from anywhere and not being locked in to
    > any system is a big part of what some people call "Web 2.0." Once you've
    > lost a hard disk or spent a lot of time traveling without your own
    > computer, you too will appreciate this way of computing!


    I've tried travelling in a country that was otherwise modern, but where
    Internet access with reasonable speeds was... Difficult. I'll never
    forget the experience.

    Why don't you go for a USB pocket HD with portable apps?

    My current one packs 100 GB in a standard laptop 2.5" HD, feeds off the
    USB (no external power needed). I can exchange the HD easily, should I
    want to.

    Some come with shock-resistant casing, some come with fingerprint
    identification etc. security features.

    BR,
    Gudmund, via Portable Thunderbird on the USB HD

  11. Re: send a link... and how long is it valid

    Ron Hunter wrote:

    > Chris Ilias wrote:
    >
    >>_PeterInMn_ spoke thusly on 18/04/2006 8:05 AM:
    >>
    >>>bandwidth aside, the web changes too fast for a simple link to be
    >>>sent. For example, a link to the front page of any web newspaper will
    >>>change by the next morning, right?

    >>
    >>I can't think of one news site that doesn't provide permanent links to
    >>each news item.

    >
    >
    > Humm. Local newspaper sites usually don't keep their stories online
    > with the same URL for more than a day or two. Many other sites replace
    > stories when a new one on the same subject comes in. Even Yahoo and
    > Excite often have stories disappear in a few days.
    >

    some local newspapers keep them online for a very long time. Mine
    does. I can search back many years worth.

    --
    Want to download the entire internet? Well believe it or not, you can
    and you can do it from here: http://www.w3schools.com/downloadwww.htm.
    Just make sure you have enough disk space.

  12. Re: drifting OT Re: send a link... and how long is it valid

    gwtc wrote:

    (lots snipped)
    >
    >
    > thats the key word -- public. The moment you make it public, then it
    > violates copyright laws. However, if you copy it for your own use,
    > then its not violating any laws.
    >

    Unless the DRM ( == Deny Rights to Movie/Music-lovers) laws get enhanced...

    These laws seem aimed at making private copies illegal.


  13. Re: drifting OT Re: send a link... and how long is it valid

    Gordon Weast wrote:

    > gwtc wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>thats the key word -- public. The moment you make it public, then it
    >>violates copyright laws. However, if you copy it for your own use,
    >>then its not violating any laws.
    >>

    > Unless the DRM ( == Deny Rights to Movie/Music-lovers) laws get enhanced...
    >
    > These laws seem aimed at making private copies illegal.


    And, it is about to get worse.

    Quote (from Reason.org): "Yes, it is time to make the Digital
    Millennium Copyright Act even stronger: If not, the terrorists are
    winning. No, really."

    (http://news.com.com/Congress+readies...tml?tag=cd.top)
    Short Version: http://tinyurl.com/mlpsz

    Beam me up, Scottie. Please.

    I left this snipped, since it is parenthetical to the technical aspect
    of this thread.

    Ron

  14. Re: drifting OT Re: send a link... and how long is it valid

    Ron Lopshire wrote:
    > Gordon Weast wrote:
    >
    >> gwtc wrote:
    >>
    >>> thats the key word -- public. The moment you make it public, then it
    >>> violates copyright laws. However, if you copy it for your own use,
    >>> then its not violating any laws.
    >>>

    >> Unless the DRM ( == Deny Rights to Movie/Music-lovers) laws get enhanced...
    >>
    >> These laws seem aimed at making private copies illegal.

    >
    > And, it is about to get worse.
    >
    > Quote (from Reason.org): "Yes, it is time to make the Digital
    > Millennium Copyright Act even stronger: If not, the terrorists are
    > winning. No, really."
    >
    > (http://news.com.com/Congress+readies...tml?tag=cd.top)
    > Short Version: http://tinyurl.com/mlpsz
    >
    > Beam me up, Scottie. Please.
    >
    > I left this snipped, since it is parenthetical to the technical aspect
    > of this thread.
    >
    > Ron


    Ahh yes, the new way to get any law passed: just cite terrorism. :-(

    --
    Alex

+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2