Where is my question? - Mozilla

This is a discussion on Where is my question? - Mozilla ; Jay Garcia wrote: > On 01.05.2008 17:19, Q wrote: > > --- Original Message --- > >> If you'd like yet another response from me, the instructions are the >> same as last time. > > Hmmm, the famous Abbott/Costello ...

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Thread: Where is my question?

  1. Re: Where is my question?

    Jay Garcia wrote:
    > On 01.05.2008 17:19, Q wrote:
    >
    > --- Original Message ---
    >
    >> If you'd like yet another response from me, the instructions are the
    >> same as last time.

    >
    > Hmmm, the famous Abbott/Costello "Who's On First" routine rings a bell. :-)
    >


    No, Jay, "Who's on first" had an ending!!

    (and, in response to your other posting, I think the last place of Pi is
    a six!)

    Daniel

  2. Re: Where is my question?

    On 02.05.2008 12:43, CET - what odd quirk of fate caused Daniel to
    generate the following:? :
    > Jay Garcia wrote:
    >
    >> On 01.05.2008 17:19, Q wrote:
    >>
    >> --- Original Message ---
    >>
    >>
    >>> If you'd like yet another response from me, the instructions are the
    >>> same as last time.
    >>>

    >> Hmmm, the famous Abbott/Costello "Who's On First" routine rings a bell. :-)
    >>
    >>

    >
    > No, Jay, "Who's on first" had an ending!!
    >
    > (and, in response to your other posting, I think the last place of Pi is
    > a six!)
    >
    > Daniel
    >


    6 point two seven three-and-a-half actually, Daniel! (therefrom, you can
    now calculate all relevant parts of the re-invented wheel)

    reg

  3. Re: Where is my question?

    On 01.05.2008 17:42, CET - what odd quirk of fate caused Terry R. to
    generate the following:? :
    > The date and time was 4/30/2008 10:01 PM, and on a whim, Moz Champion
    > (Dan) pounded out on the keyboard:
    >
    >
    >> I post here as Moz Champion, and always have. My real email address (or
    >> one of them) is always included in any post I make. I don't make posts
    >> 'as' anyone else, nor do I take up different indentities.
    >>
    >> If 'as far as you are concerned' I am the one posting as the Purple
    >> Hippo, then sir, I shall ask you for proof of such, or you shall be
    >> deemed a LIAR and dealt with accordingly.
    >>
    >> You sir, are beyond redemption it seems. You are simply proving that
    >> someone's decision to ban you was correct.
    >>

    >
    > Do you always have to revert to calling people liars after calling them sir?
    >
    >


    that's one way of being polite, Terry!
    "You are a stupid idiot" is very impolite - almost an insult even - and
    is what officers say to the common soldier
    "You, Sir, are a stupid idiot" is what a common soldier says to an officer

    needless to say, the soldier lands in the clink - for one and the same
    statement! (officers are not called Pigs without reason)

    reg

  4. Re: Where is my question?

    Jay Garcia wrote:

    > On 01.05.2008 19:38, Irwin Greenwald wrote:
    >
    > > PP and Q have a Groundhog Day sequence going!

    >
    > The last place for the value of pi will be found before this is over.


    Nah, I'm done unless he cranks up the name-calling again.

    FWIW, the last place in the decimal representation is a 3. But keep in
    mind I started from the right.

  5. Re: Where is my question?

    Daniel wrote:
    > Jay Garcia wrote:
    >> On 01.05.2008 17:19, Q wrote:
    >>
    >> --- Original Message ---
    >>
    >>> If you'd like yet another response from me, the instructions are the
    >>> same as last time.

    >> Hmmm, the famous Abbott/Costello "Who's On First" routine rings a bell. :-)
    >>

    >
    > No, Jay, "Who's on first" had an ending!!
    >
    > (and, in response to your other posting, I think the last place of Pi is
    > a six!)
    >
    > Daniel


    how can pi have an ending. It doesn't. It just goes on and
    on and on and on and so forth.

    In 1949, the ENIAC took 70 hours to yield 2,037 digits.
    However, in 1997, a Hitachi mainframe computed pi to 51.5
    billion digits in 29 hours. The bottom line is that the
    absolutely exact value of pi cannot be computed.

    --
    *IMPORTANT*: Sorry folks, but I cannot provide email
    help!!!! Emails to me may become public

    Notice: This posting is protected under the Free Speech
    Laws, which applies everywhere in the FREE world, except for
    some strange reason, not to the mozilla.org newsgroup
    servers, where your posting may get you banned.

    Peter Potamus & His Magic Flying Balloon:
    http://www.toonopedia.com/potamus.htm

  6. Re: Where is my question?

    Peter Potamus the Purple Hippo said the following On 05/02/2008 11:05 PM:

    > how can pi have an ending. It doesn't. It just goes on and on and on and
    > on and so forth.
    >
    > In 1949, the ENIAC took 70 hours to yield 2,037 digits. However, in
    > 1997, a Hitachi mainframe computed pi to 51.5 billion digits in 29
    > hours. The bottom line is that the absolutely exact value of pi cannot
    > be computed.
    >


    Ha! So it has no end ! Let me give you a little clue . Here is a very
    simple equation .

    "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euler%27s_identity"

    Just take Ln on both side and simply put exact value of other constants
    and get the value of Pi :P

  7. Re: Where is my question?

    Nir wrote:
    > Peter Potamus the Purple Hippo said the following On 05/02/2008 11:05 PM:
    >
    >> how can pi have an ending. It doesn't. It just goes on and on and on and
    >> on and so forth.
    >>
    >> In 1949, the ENIAC took 70 hours to yield 2,037 digits. However, in
    >> 1997, a Hitachi mainframe computed pi to 51.5 billion digits in 29
    >> hours. The bottom line is that the absolutely exact value of pi cannot
    >> be computed.
    >>

    >
    > Ha! So it has no end ! Let me give you a little clue . Here is a very
    > simple equation .
    >
    > "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euler%27s_identity"
    >
    > Just take Ln on both side and simply put exact value of other constants
    > and get the value of Pi :P


    Why not simply substitute 22/7 for pi. You can get exact figures with
    no decimal places in a lot of equations.

    Example: If the radius of a circle is 14 cm what is the circumference?

    2(pi)r=c
    2 * 22/7 * 14 = 88 cm (no decimal places)

  8. Re: Where is my question?

    Dennis wrote:
    > Nir wrote:
    >
    >> Peter Potamus the Purple Hippo said the following On 05/02/2008 11:05 PM:
    >>
    >>> how can pi have an ending. It doesn't. It just goes on and on and on and
    >>> on and so forth.
    >>>
    >>> In 1949, the ENIAC took 70 hours to yield 2,037 digits. However, in
    >>> 1997, a Hitachi mainframe computed pi to 51.5 billion digits in 29
    >>> hours. The bottom line is that the absolutely exact value of pi cannot
    >>> be computed.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Ha! So it has no end ! Let me give you a little clue . Here is a very
    >> simple equation .
    >>
    >> "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euler%27s_identity"
    >>
    >> Just take Ln on both side and simply put exact value of other
    >> constants and get the value of Pi :P

    >
    >
    > Why not simply substitute 22/7 for pi. You can get exact figures with no
    > decimal places in a lot of equations.
    >
    > Example: If the radius of a circle is 14 cm what is the circumference?
    >
    > 2(pi)r=c
    > 2 * 22/7 * 14 = 88 cm (no decimal places)

    You have to be willing to accept a fairly large amount of error in your
    calculation to use 22/7 since that is 3.142857........... instead of
    3.141592..................

    Bob B.

  9. Re: Where is my question?

    Nir wrote:
    > Peter Potamus the Purple Hippo said the following On 05/02/2008 11:05 PM:
    >
    >> how can pi have an ending. It doesn't. It just goes on and on and on and
    >> on and so forth.
    >>
    >> In 1949, the ENIAC took 70 hours to yield 2,037 digits. However, in
    >> 1997, a Hitachi mainframe computed pi to 51.5 billion digits in 29
    >> hours. The bottom line is that the absolutely exact value of pi cannot
    >> be computed.
    >>

    >
    > Ha! So it has no end ! Let me give you a little clue . Here is a very
    > simple equation .
    >
    > "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euler%27s_identity"
    >
    > Just take Ln on both side and simply put exact value of other constants
    > and get the value of Pi :P


    incase you didn't read my posting which applies to you,
    please see the last paragraph and especially the last 8 words:

    news://news.mozilla.org:119/W7-dneH6...2d@mozilla.org
    http://groups.google.com/group/mozil...3f5eb3630e3258

    --
    *IMPORTANT*: Sorry folks, but I cannot provide email
    help!!!! Emails to me may become public

    Notice: This posting is protected under the Free Speech
    Laws, which applies everywhere in the FREE world, except for
    some strange reason, not to the mozilla.org newsgroup
    servers, where your posting may get you banned.

    Peter Potamus & His Magic Flying Balloon:
    http://www.toonopedia.com/potamus.htm

  10. Re: Where is my question?

    On 02.05.2008 12:35, Peter Potamus the Purple Hippo wrote:

    --- Original Message ---
    > how can pi have an ending. It doesn't. It just goes on and
    > on and on and on and so forth.


    Your sense of humor definitely has a termination point and it was just
    prior to this reply. :-D

    --
    Jay Garcia Netscape Champion
    UFAQ - http://www.UFAQ.org

  11. Re: Where is my question?

    On 02.05.2008 15:47, Peter Potamus the Purple Hippo wrote:

    --- Original Message ---

    > incase you didn't read my posting which applies to you,
    > please see the last paragraph and especially the last 8 words:
    >
    > news://news.mozilla.org:119/W7-dneH6...2d@mozilla.org
    > http://groups.google.com/group/mozil...3f5eb3630e3258


    Cripes, not this again !!

    --
    Jay Garcia Netscape Champion
    UFAQ - http://www.UFAQ.org

  12. Re: Where is my question?

    Jay Garcia wrote:
    > On 02.05.2008 15:47, Peter Potamus the Purple Hippo wrote:
    >
    > --- Original Message ---
    >
    >> incase you didn't read my posting which applies to you,
    >> please see the last paragraph and especially the last 8 words:
    >>
    >> news://news.mozilla.org:119/W7-dneH6...2d@mozilla.org
    >> http://groups.google.com/group/mozil...3f5eb3630e3258

    >
    > Cripes, not this again !!
    >


    Have I hit all the Mozilla Bullies yet. I can't remember.
    I got stuck in a pi.

    --
    *IMPORTANT*: Sorry folks, but I cannot provide email
    help!!!! Emails to me may become public

    Notice: This posting is protected under the Free Speech
    Laws, which applies everywhere in the FREE world, except for
    some strange reason, not to the mozilla.org newsgroup
    servers, where your posting may get you banned.

    Peter Potamus & His Magic Flying Balloon:
    http://www.toonopedia.com/potamus.htm

  13. Re: Where is my question?

    Jay Garcia wrote:
    > On 02.05.2008 12:35, Peter Potamus the Purple Hippo wrote:
    >
    > --- Original Message ---
    >> how can pi have an ending. It doesn't. It just goes on and
    >> on and on and on and so forth.

    >
    > Your sense of humor definitely has a termination point and it was just
    > prior to this reply. :-D
    >


    we're caught in a pi. I wonder if its a blue berry or a
    black berry one? I like rhubarb and strawberry one. Then
    again, nothing beats a Saskatoon Berry pi.

    --
    *IMPORTANT*: Sorry folks, but I cannot provide email
    help!!!! Emails to me may become public

    Notice: This posting is protected under the Free Speech
    Laws, which applies everywhere in the FREE world, except for
    some strange reason, not to the mozilla.org newsgroup
    servers, where your posting may get you banned.

    Peter Potamus & His Magic Flying Balloon:
    http://www.toonopedia.com/potamus.htm

  14. Re: Where is my question?

    Bob Bainbridge wrote:
    > Dennis wrote:
    >> Nir wrote:
    >>
    >>> Peter Potamus the Purple Hippo said the following On 05/02/2008 11:05
    >>> PM:
    >>>
    >>>> how can pi have an ending. It doesn't. It just goes on and on and on
    >>>> and
    >>>> on and so forth.
    >>>>
    >>>> In 1949, the ENIAC took 70 hours to yield 2,037 digits. However, in
    >>>> 1997, a Hitachi mainframe computed pi to 51.5 billion digits in 29
    >>>> hours. The bottom line is that the absolutely exact value of pi cannot
    >>>> be computed.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Ha! So it has no end ! Let me give you a little clue . Here is a
    >>> very simple equation .
    >>>
    >>> "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euler%27s_identity"
    >>>
    >>> Just take Ln on both side and simply put exact value of other
    >>> constants and get the value of Pi :P

    >>
    >>
    >> Why not simply substitute 22/7 for pi. You can get exact figures with
    >> no decimal places in a lot of equations.
    >>
    >> Example: If the radius of a circle is 14 cm what is the circumference?
    >>
    >> 2(pi)r=c
    >> 2 * 22/7 * 14 = 88 cm (no decimal places)

    > You have to be willing to accept a fairly large amount of error in your
    > calculation to use 22/7 since that is 3.142857........... instead of
    > 3.141592..................
    >
    > Bob B.


    Ya know what? I knew that once! Why do I remember the stuff I need to
    forget and forget the stuff I should remember? I had a similar
    discussion about this some 30 years ago!!!
    --
    Dennis

  15. Re: Where is my question?

    Q wrote:
    > Jay Garcia wrote:
    >
    >> On 01.05.2008 19:38, Irwin Greenwald wrote:
    >>




    > FWIW, the last place in the decimal representation is a 3. But keep in
    > mind I started from the right.


    Har! Har! Har!

    Daniel

  16. Re: Where is my question?

    Bob Bainbridge wrote:
    > Dennis wrote:
    >> Nir wrote:
    >>
    >>> Peter Potamus the Purple Hippo said the following On 05/02/2008 11:05
    >>> PM:
    >>>
    >>>> how can pi have an ending. It doesn't. It just goes on and on and on
    >>>> and
    >>>> on and so forth.
    >>>>
    >>>> In 1949, the ENIAC took 70 hours to yield 2,037 digits. However, in
    >>>> 1997, a Hitachi mainframe computed pi to 51.5 billion digits in 29
    >>>> hours. The bottom line is that the absolutely exact value of pi cannot
    >>>> be computed.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Ha! So it has no end ! Let me give you a little clue . Here is a
    >>> very simple equation .
    >>>
    >>> "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euler%27s_identity"
    >>>
    >>> Just take Ln on both side and simply put exact value of other
    >>> constants and get the value of Pi :P

    >>
    >>
    >> Why not simply substitute 22/7 for pi. You can get exact figures with
    >> no decimal places in a lot of equations.
    >>
    >> Example: If the radius of a circle is 14 cm what is the circumference?
    >>
    >> 2(pi)r=c
    >> 2 * 22/7 * 14 = 88 cm (no decimal places)

    > You have to be willing to accept a fairly large amount of error in your
    > calculation to use 22/7 since that is 3.142857........... instead of
    > 3.141592..................
    >
    > Bob B.

    pi r square unless you bake it then its round ;-)

    --
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Phillip M. Jones, CET http://www.vpea.org
    If it's "fixed", don't "break it"! mailtojones@kimbanet.com
    http://www.kimbanet.com/~pjones/default.htm
    Mac G4-500, OSX.3.9, 1.5GB Mac 17" PowerBook G4-1.67 GHz, 2 GB OSX.4.11
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

  17. Re: Where is my question?

    *-* On Fri, 02 May 2008 16:47:24 -0400,
    *-* In Article L62dnUGRdvVH4IbVnZ2dnUVZ_jSdnZ2d@mozilla.org,
    *-* Bob Bainbridge wrote
    *-* About Re: Where is my question?

    > Dennis wrote:
    >> Nir wrote:


    >>> Peter Potamus the Purple Hippo said the following On 05/02/2008
    >>> 11:05 PM:


    >>>> how can pi have an ending. It doesn't. It just goes on and on and
    >>>> on and on and so forth.


    >>>> In 1949, the ENIAC took 70 hours to yield 2,037 digits. However,
    >>>> in 1997, a Hitachi mainframe computed pi to 51.5 billion digits
    >>>> in 29 hours. The bottom line is that the absolutely exact value
    >>>> of pi cannot be computed.


    >>> Ha! So it has no end ! Let me give you a little clue . Here is a
    >>> very simple equation .


    >>> "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euler%27s_identity"


    >>> Just take Ln on both side and simply put exact value of other
    >>> constants and get the value of Pi :P


    That's easier said than done. :-D

    >> Why not simply substitute 22/7 for pi. You can get exact figures
    >> with no decimal places in a lot of equations.


    >> Example: If the radius of a circle is 14 cm what is the
    >> circumference?


    >> 2(pi)r=c
    >> 2 * 22/7 * 14 = 88 cm (no decimal places)

    > You have to be willing to accept a fairly large amount of error in
    > your calculation to use 22/7 since that is 3.142857...........
    > instead of 3.141592..................


    A closer approximation is 355/113. It matches to six decimal
    places: pi: 3.14159,26535,89793,23846,26433,83279,5...
    355/113: 3.14159,29203,53982,30088,49557,52212,4...

    This discussion of pi brings back memories. When I was in
    college, some of us used to see how many decimal places of both pi
    and e we could memorize. I had pi memorized to 60 places, and some
    others had as many as 110 places. Needless to say, I no longer
    remember all 60 places. :-(

    Ken Whiton

    FIDO: 1:132/152
    InterNet: kenwhiton@surfglobal.net.INVAL (remove the obvious to reply)

  18. Re: Where is my question?

    *-* On Fri, 02 May 2008, at 14:26:09 -0700,
    *-* In Article i9OdnYsjtoddGIbVnZ2dnUVZ_hninZ2d@mozilla.org,
    *-* Peter Potamus the Purple Hippo wrote
    *-* About Re: Where is my question?

    > Jay Garcia wrote:
    >> On 02.05.2008 12:35, Peter Potamus the Purple Hippo wrote:


    >> --- Original Message ---
    >>> how can pi have an ending. It doesn't. It just goes on and on
    >>> and on and on and so forth.


    >> Your sense of humor definitely has a termination point and it was
    >> just prior to this reply. :-D


    > we're caught in a pi. I wonder if its a blue berry or a black berry
    > one? I like rhubarb and strawberry one. Then again, nothing beats
    > a Saskatoon Berry pi.


    I'm kind of partial to pizza pi. ;-)

    Ken Whiton

    FIDO: 1:132/152
    InterNet: kenwhiton@surfglobal.net.INVAL (remove the obvious to reply)

  19. Re: Where is my question?

    Jay Garcia wrote:

    > On 02.05.2008 15:47, Peter Potamus the Purple Hippo wrote:
    >
    > --- Original Message ---
    >
    > > incase you didn't read my posting which applies to you,


    > Cripes, not this again !!


    He's said he intends to do it every time.

  20. Re: Where is my question?

    Irwin Greenwald wrote:
    > On 5/1/2008 Peter Potamus the Purple Hippo said
    >> everytime you reply to me, it just shows everyone how ignorant you
    >> are, that you can't follow simple little instructions. Please follow
    >> the instructions on the last paragraph of my message:

    >
    > Why is anyone required to follow your "instructions"?
    >


    no, not anyone, just three individuals. Just those who are
    part of The Mozilla Bully Gang.

    --
    *IMPORTANT*: Sorry folks, but I cannot provide email
    help!!!! Emails to me may become public

    Notice: This posting is protected under the Free Speech
    Laws, which applies everywhere in the FREE world, except for
    some strange reason, not to the mozilla.org newsgroup
    servers, where your posting may get you banned.

    Peter Potamus & His Magic Flying Balloon:
    http://www.toonopedia.com/potamus.htm

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