Seamonkey 1.1 Basic Engine - Mozilla

This is a discussion on Seamonkey 1.1 Basic Engine - Mozilla ; Will v 1.1 of Seamonkey use the same basic code engine as Firefox/Thunderbird? As I understand it, Seamonkey 1.0.xx uses the older code base - same as Mozilla/Netscape. If not part of v 1.1, when is Seamonkey expected to use ...

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Thread: Seamonkey 1.1 Basic Engine

  1. Seamonkey 1.1 Basic Engine

    Will v 1.1 of Seamonkey use the same basic code engine as
    Firefox/Thunderbird?

    As I understand it, Seamonkey 1.0.xx uses the older code base - same as
    Mozilla/Netscape.

    If not part of v 1.1, when is Seamonkey expected to use the new code
    base - last I read it was going to be sometime in early 2007.

    Or - am I all confused???

    --
    JohnW-Mpls


  2. Re: Seamonkey 1.1 Basic Engine

    /johnwfa@comcast.net/:

    > Will v 1.1 of Seamonkey use the same basic code engine as
    > Firefox/Thunderbird?
    >
    > As I understand it, Seamonkey 1.0.xx uses the older code base - same as
    > Mozilla/Netscape.
    >
    > If not part of v 1.1, when is Seamonkey expected to use the new code
    > base - last I read it was going to be sometime in early 2007.
    >
    > Or - am I all confused???


    SeaMonkey uses just the same Gecko engine as Firefox/Thunderbird do.
    Currently SeaMonkey 1.0 and Thunderbird 1.5 use the Gecko 1.8.0
    branch while Firefox 2.0 uses the Gecko 1.8.1 branch. SeaMonkey 1.1
    and Thunderbird 2.0 (will) use Gecko 1.8.1 as well.

    --
    Stanimir

  3. Re: Seamonkey 1.1 Basic Engine

    johnwfa@comcast.net schrieb:
    > Will v 1.1 of Seamonkey use the same basic code engine as
    > Firefox/Thunderbird?
    >
    > As I understand it, Seamonkey 1.0.xx uses the older code base - same as
    > Mozilla/Netscape.


    Depends on what you call "code base". Lots of stuff (Gecko, necko,
    libpr0n, xpcom, etc.) is exactly the same in Firefox 1.5.x and SeaMonkey
    1.0.x and will be the same in SeaMonkey 1.1.x as it is in Firefox 2.0.x,
    and all of that is "just" further developed code that for the most part
    was already in use in Mozilla suite 1.x and Netscape 6.x/7.x release.

    If you're talking about code of the XUL-based toolkit, about chrome
    registry, startup code, extension management, etc., the story is a bit
    different: While SeaMonkey 1.0.x and 1.1.x use basically the same code
    as mentioned Mozilla/Netscape releases (often referred to as "xpfe
    code"), Firefox uses majorly reworked versions of those parts (often
    referred to as "new toolkit" and also used in the XULRunner platform).
    SeaMonkey will only make the change to that in the release based on
    Gecko 1.9, which currently is under heavy development under the internal
    code-name of "suiterunner". This will be versioned 1.5 or 2.0 and be
    released some time in 2007.

    Robert Kaiser

  4. Re: Seamonkey 1.1 Basic Engine

    Stanimir Stamenkov wrote:
    > /johnwfa@comcast.net/:
    >
    >> Will v 1.1 of Seamonkey use the same basic code engine as
    >> Firefox/Thunderbird?
    >>
    >> As I understand it, Seamonkey 1.0.xx uses the older code base - same as
    >> Mozilla/Netscape.
    >>
    >> If not part of v 1.1, when is Seamonkey expected to use the new code
    >> base - last I read it was going to be sometime in early 2007.
    >>
    >> Or - am I all confused???

    >
    > SeaMonkey uses just the same Gecko engine as Firefox/Thunderbird do.
    > Currently SeaMonkey 1.0 and Thunderbird 1.5 use the Gecko 1.8.0 branch
    > while Firefox 2.0 uses the Gecko 1.8.1 branch. SeaMonkey 1.1 and
    > Thunderbird 2.0 (will) use Gecko 1.8.1 as well.
    >


    I think the OP wants to know when will Mozilla drop Gecko and start
    using Cairo.

    --
    "Oh! Heavens to Murgatroid. Exit, Stage Left!" -- Snagglepuss
    http://www.toonopedia.com/snaggle.htm

    Please do not email me for help. Reply to the newsgroup only. Thanks

  5. Re: Seamonkey 1.1 Basic Engine

    Snagglepuss wrote:
    > Stanimir Stamenkov wrote:
    >> /johnwfa@comcast.net/:
    >>
    >>> Will v 1.1 of Seamonkey use the same basic code engine as
    >>> Firefox/Thunderbird?
    >>>
    >>> As I understand it, Seamonkey 1.0.xx uses the older code base - same as
    >>> Mozilla/Netscape.
    >>>
    >>> If not part of v 1.1, when is Seamonkey expected to use the new code
    >>> base - last I read it was going to be sometime in early 2007.
    >>>
    >>> Or - am I all confused???

    >>
    >> SeaMonkey uses just the same Gecko engine as Firefox/Thunderbird do.
    >> Currently SeaMonkey 1.0 and Thunderbird 1.5 use the Gecko 1.8.0
    >> branch while Firefox 2.0 uses the Gecko 1.8.1 branch. SeaMonkey 1.1
    >> and Thunderbird 2.0 (will) use Gecko 1.8.1 as well.
    >>

    >
    > I think the OP wants to know when will Mozilla drop Gecko and start
    > using Cairo.
    >


    Cairo is just for drawing stuff to the screen... the whole layout engine
    is still called Gecko.

    Chris

  6. Re: Seamonkey 1.1 Basic Engine


    Robert Kaiser wrote:
    > johnwfa@comcast.net schrieb:
    > > Will v 1.1 of Seamonkey use the same basic code engine as
    > > Firefox/Thunderbird?
    > >
    > > As I understand it, Seamonkey 1.0.xx uses the older code base - same as
    > > Mozilla/Netscape.

    >
    > Depends on what you call "code base". Lots of stuff (Gecko, necko,
    > libpr0n, xpcom, etc.) is exactly the same in Firefox 1.5.x and SeaMonkey
    > 1.0.x and will be the same in SeaMonkey 1.1.x as it is in Firefox 2.0.x,
    > and all of that is "just" further developed code that for the most part
    > was already in use in Mozilla suite 1.x and Netscape 6.x/7.x release.
    >
    > If you're talking about code of the XUL-based toolkit, about chrome
    > registry, startup code, extension management, etc., the story is a bit
    > different: While SeaMonkey 1.0.x and 1.1.x use basically the same code
    > as mentioned Mozilla/Netscape releases (often referred to as "xpfe
    > code"), Firefox uses majorly reworked versions of those parts (often
    > referred to as "new toolkit" and also used in the XULRunner platform).
    > SeaMonkey will only make the change to that in the release based on
    > Gecko 1.9, which currently is under heavy development under the internal
    > code-name of "suiterunner". This will be versioned 1.5 or 2.0 and be
    > released some time in 2007.
    >
    > Robert Kaiser



    Thanks for your replies - you answered a couple questions for me.

    As of last summer I read that Seamonkey is replacing Mozilla and early
    in 2007 would make a great leap forward to match the wonderful code
    being used for Firefox and Thunderbird. From what you have just now
    said, Seamonkey & Firefox already are using the same fundamental
    up-to-date-code and both will switch to something newer about mid '07.

    Conclusion: Seamonkey is great now, so use it.

    Last August I was using Seamonkey (1.0.4) when I got an Error message
    when booting my Win98SE - had to reboot into safe mode with all that
    entails. Two apps just would not run, Seamonkey and Nero. Had to do
    a
    full restore and new installations of Seamonkey and Nero - blew a whole
    day getting everything working again.

    Same problem one morning in October - and same two apps would not run.
    Ah ha, not a hardware fluke but a repeatable SW problem and both
    started
    after installing Seamonkey. Took only a few hours to recover this
    time.
    including uninstalling Seamonkey (1.0.5) and reinstalling Mozilla.
    Might as well wait for the big update in '07 before trying Seamonkey
    again (Mozilla works fine - I just don't what to get behind!)

    Conclusion: Hope that my Seamonkey bug is now fixed (1.0.7) and try it
    again.


    --
    JohnW-Mpls


  7. Re: Seamonkey 1.1 Basic Engine

    If only the new calendar extension worked with the latest version on
    SeaMonkey. The old calendar version works but lacks the features
    available in the recent calendar extension.

    On 30.Dec.06 1:54 pm, johnwfa@comcast.net wrote:
    > Robert Kaiser wrote:
    >> johnwfa@comcast.net schrieb:

    >
    > Conclusion: Seamonkey is great now, so use it.
    >


  8. Re: Seamonkey 1.1 Basic Engine

    aerosmith wrote:
    > If only the new calendar extension worked with the latest version on
    > SeaMonkey. The old calendar version works but lacks the features
    > available in the recent calendar extension.
    >
    > On 30.Dec.06 1:54 pm, johnwfa@comcast.net wrote:
    >> Robert Kaiser wrote:
    >>> johnwfa@comcast.net schrieb:

    >>
    >> Conclusion: Seamonkey is great now, so use it.
    >>


    I must confess, I've never tried a calendar add-on to a browser. In
    fact, I can't imagine why I'd want to. They seem so totally separated
    in characterization, function, style, purpose, everything.

    I do have a calendar program. And I can't imagine needing it to
    integrate into my browser at any level or for any reason.

    Anyone care to enlighten me why this is a good idea?

    --
    Ed Mullen
    http://edmullen.net
    http://mozilla.edmullen.net
    http://abington.edmullen.net
    Everyone has a right to be stupid. Some just abuse the privilege.

  9. Re: Seamonkey 1.1 Basic Engine

    johnwfa@comcast.net wrote:
    > Might as well wait for the big update in '07 before trying Seamonkey
    > again (Mozilla works fine - I just don't what to get behind!)
    >


    Please keep in mind that Mozilla is no longer receiving security updates
    (it hasn't been, for a while). It's likely that some of the issues
    fixed in more recent SeaMonkey and Firefox releases were also present in
    the Mozilla 1.7.x suite, so you're taking a risk here.

    Chris

  10. Re: Seamonkey 1.1 Basic Engine

    aerosmith schrieb:
    > If only the new calendar extension worked with the latest version on
    > SeaMonkey. The old calendar version works but lacks the features
    > available in the recent calendar extension.


    Making Lightning work with SeaMonkey will still require some work
    (mainly some slight adjustments on the Lightning side) but it will be
    possible in some way in the next-generation SeaMonkey.
    Without any changes, it can be built with current experimental
    "suiterunner" code, it does integrate somewhat, but some parts are still
    missing.

    Robert Kaiser

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