Book: Operating Systems: Design And Implementation - Minix

This is a discussion on Book: Operating Systems: Design And Implementation - Minix ; Hello, I'd like to have a copy of ast's book, but honestly I don't think I want to spend close to 53 Euros on it (used). I am not a CS student and I don't plan to go into OS ...

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Thread: Book: Operating Systems: Design And Implementation

  1. Book: Operating Systems: Design And Implementation

    Hello,

    I'd like to have a copy of ast's book, but honestly I don't think I
    want to spend close to 53 Euros on it (used). I am not a CS student
    and I don't plan to go into OS development. I'm just curous about how
    Minix works. But I'll probably just study it for a few months and then
    move on to something else.

    I can get the second edition for 18 EUR and the first edition for 6
    EUR. But I know that they don't cover Minix 3 and that Minix changed a
    lot in version 3. What do you think? If I got one of the older
    editions would it still help me understand Minix 3? Or are they
    hopelessly outdated? The first edition is 21 years old...

    I wish I could borrow the book from a library, or at least do the
    "search inside" thing at Amazon. As it is, I don't really know what
    I'd be buying.

    Cheers,
    Daniel.

  2. Re: Book: Operating Systems: Design And Implementation

    Daniel Carrera wrote:
    > I can get the second edition for 18 EUR and the first edition for 6
    > EUR. But I know that they don't cover Minix 3 and that Minix changed a
    > lot in version 3. What do you think? If I got one of the older
    > editions would it still help me understand Minix 3? Or are they
    > hopelessly outdated? The first edition is 21 years old...


    I own the second edition, because I needed it for a course when the third
    edition wasn't out yet. It explains most of the concepts and challenges in
    an OS-independent manner (it extensively covers VM and paging and the lot
    even though MINIX doesn't have it), but the code examples are of course
    MINIX 2, not 3. I think it's still a great book on operating systems, but
    it won't do as a reference. So, if you want the theory, the second book
    should do. If you want it to help you work on MINIX 3, you wight want to
    get a (second-hand) copy of the third edition.

    Regards,

    Jens

    --
    Jens de Smit
    Student Computer Science | Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
    jfdsmit@few.vu.nl | http://www.few.vu.nl/~jfdsmit
    "[In the end, people] get furious at IT that the goddamn magic isn't working"
    -- Stewart Dean


  3. Re: Book: Operating Systems: Design And Implementation

    On Aug 27, 1:40*pm, "J.F. de Smit" wrote:
    > I own the second edition, because I needed it for a course when the third
    > edition wasn't out yet. It explains most of the concepts and challenges in
    > an OS-independent manner (it extensively covers VM and paging and the lot
    > even though MINIX doesn't have it), but the code examples are of course
    > MINIX 2, not 3. I think it's still a great book on operating systems, but
    > it won't do as a reference. So, if you want the theory, the second book
    > should do. If you want it to help you work on MINIX 3, you wight want to
    > get a (second-hand) copy of the third edition.


    Thanks. I'll have to think about it, but now I have a good idea what
    the difference is. I'm leaning toward the second edition.

    How much experience do I need before I can read this book? I am not a
    CS graduate, my degree is in math and physics. I know C from a couple
    of programming courses ("programming for scientists" and "unix
    programming") but I'm very out of practice. If the book is at the
    first or second year university level I should be fine, but if it is
    at the masters level, it might be too much for me.

    Daniel.

  4. Re: Book: Operating Systems: Design And Implementation

    Daniel Carrera wrote:
    > How much experience do I need before I can read this book? I am not a
    > CS graduate, my degree is in math and physics. I know C from a couple
    > of programming courses ("programming for scientists" and "unix
    > programming") but I'm very out of practice. If the book is at the
    > first or second year university level I should be fine, but if it is
    > at the masters level, it might be too much for me.


    It's at third year level actually At least, it is taught in the third
    year here at the VU. As I said, the book deals largely in concepts, not in
    code. My C knowledge was very limited when I did the course, but I passed
    it quite easily. You might want to re-read a primer on C before tackling
    the code examples, but you'll get through the book fine without being a
    kernel hacker.

    Regards,

    Jens


    --
    Jens de Smit
    Student Computer Science | Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
    jfdsmit@few.vu.nl | http://www.few.vu.nl/~jfdsmit
    "[In the end, people] get furious at IT that the goddamn magic isn't working"
    -- Stewart Dean

  5. Re: Book: Operating Systems: Design And Implementation

    On Aug 27, 2:45*pm, "J.F. de Smit" wrote:
    > It's at third year level actually At least, it is taught in the third
    > year here at the VU. As I said, the book deals largely in concepts, not in
    > code. My C knowledge was very limited when I did the course, but I passed
    > it quite easily. You might want to re-read a primer on C before tackling
    > the code examples, but you'll get through the book fine without being a
    > kernel hacker.


    Excellent. Thanks.

    Daniel.

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