canonical vs non-canonical - Minix

This is a discussion on canonical vs non-canonical - Minix ; hi all ive got an understanding problem im reading this book: operating systems: design and implementation and it talks about cooked/canonical and raw/non-canonical modes now, i dont really understand whats meant by that? is there any chance for me to ...

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Thread: canonical vs non-canonical

  1. canonical vs non-canonical

    hi all

    ive got an understanding problem
    im reading this book: operating systems: design and implementation
    and it talks about cooked/canonical and raw/non-canonical modes
    now, i dont really understand whats meant by that?
    is there any chance for me to see the 2 things in action, just two
    grasp whats being talked about here?

    thanx,

    martin


  2. Re: canonical vs non-canonical


    sancho1980 wrote:
    > hi all
    >
    > ive got an understanding problem
    > im reading this book: operating systems: design and implementation
    > and it talks about cooked/canonical and raw/non-canonical modes
    > now, i dont really understand whats meant by that?
    > is there any chance for me to see the 2 things in action, just two
    > grasp whats being talked about here?


    Hmm...can you point out specifically where it is?

    I know that (as a rule of thumb, in math and physics at least),
    canonical means "the normal way of doing something" or "the most
    popular way of doing something". But I would think that it would have a
    different meaning in operating systems theory than in math


  3. Re: canonical vs non-canonical

    first chapter, page 36/37

    Pablo Rodriguez wrote:
    > sancho1980 wrote:
    > > hi all
    > >
    > > ive got an understanding problem
    > > im reading this book: operating systems: design and implementation
    > > and it talks about cooked/canonical and raw/non-canonical modes
    > > now, i dont really understand whats meant by that?
    > > is there any chance for me to see the 2 things in action, just two
    > > grasp whats being talked about here?

    >
    > Hmm...can you point out specifically where it is?
    >
    > I know that (as a rule of thumb, in math and physics at least),
    > canonical means "the normal way of doing something" or "the most
    > popular way of doing something". But I would think that it would have a
    > different meaning in operating systems theory than in math



  4. Re: canonical vs non-canonical


    sancho1980 wrote:
    > first chapter, page 36/37
    >

    Hmmm...well, the way it looks, "canonical mode" is POSIX's technical
    term for "cooked mode". That basically means that it's the normal mode,
    how someone would normally use the terminal.

    And "noncanonical mode" is not the same as "raw mode".

    "Raw mode" is where every character is not processed; instead it is
    directly given to the program. It doesn't wait for the complete line to
    be typed out either.

    "Noncanonical Mode" is where a minimum number of characters to accept
    and a time interval that determines how a read will be satisfied.

    Hope that helps a little...


  5. Re: canonical vs non-canonical

    > is there any chance for me to see the 2 things in action, just two
    > grasp whats being talked about here?


    Martin

    If you have access to a GNU compatible system, eg. a Linux box, take a
    look at
    http://www.ugcs.caltech.edu/manuals/.../libc_375.html
    and
    http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Serial-Pro...OWTO/x115.html.
    Compile and run the samples there and you will grasp the difference!

    Regards,
    Bahman


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