More ideas for Minix 3. - Minix

This is a discussion on More ideas for Minix 3. - Minix ; I was brainstorming some ideas for Minix 3, and decided to post them instead of discard them (like I normally do). First of all, take hardware autodetection and break it into 6 servers. One server for handling PCI plug-and-play devices ...

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  1. More ideas for Minix 3.

    I was brainstorming some ideas for Minix 3, and decided to post them
    instead of discard them (like I normally do).

    First of all, take hardware autodetection and break it into 6 servers.
    One server for handling PCI plug-and-play devices (all PCI is PnP, but
    still...). One server for ISA plug-and-play, another server for USB. A
    fourth server for parallel PnP (like a parallel PnP printer), and a fith
    server for detecting non-PnP hardware like old (non-Vibra16)
    Soundblaster 16-bit cards. The last server would be to enumerate all the
    devices with the system.

    With the soundblaster code, we must also take note to the fact that the
    Soundblaster 32-AWE is a feature-loaded card. It will identify as 2
    different ISA-PnP devices on a PnP scan. First is the main DSP/EAX unit,
    and the second being the IDE controller. Yes this card has an IDE
    controller that is PnP. It's not EIDE so you can only stick one device
    on it, but that device isn't limited to a non-autoconfigurable CD-ROM or
    Hard Drive. I have used Linux and had it automatically detect a LBA
    drive attached to this IDE interface (it was a 40GB HD), and
    automatically assign it to /dev/hde. Also, the SB32AWE has a pair of
    30-pin SIMM slots for 3D audio memory. This can be expanded, i presume,
    by getting 30-pin SIMMs that hold more memory that the 2 that ship with
    the card. I still have one of these SIMMs, and had once mapped it to
    high memory in DOS. Not to mention that the device can do EAX 3D
    hardware audio and Dobly 5.1 surround. Not bad for a card made in '94.

    Video cards nowadays have WAY more memory than Minix 3 ever touches.
    This memory can be mapped to more useful functions. (Ramdisk, anyone?)
    Also Minix3 needs to take into account for hardware consoles that are
    larger than 80x25. I prefer to set my video card to 132x60 if I have to
    use hardware textmode. Even with a 15" monitor. I can read it, and
    everyone else can go to hell for all I care.

    Minix 3 also needs a layer for handling HID devices. These are, in a
    nutshell, USB keyboards, mice, and joysticks/gamepads.

    I was thinking about FireWire (IEEE1394), but since that is as good as
    dead now-a-days, I say forget it.

    Minix 3 also had one final thing I will list. A driver compatable with
    most, if not all of the 3COM cards that the FreeBSD 'xl' ethernet driver
    supports. Doing a handcount reveals that's over 60 different card
    models, and not to mention that 3C905 variants are one of the most
    common ethernet cards on the face of the planet. I have about 5 of the
    damned things, and ill sell one to someone for $20+S&H. It's a 3COM
    3C905B-TX by the way.

    I hope I didn't upset anyone of seem a bit overgoing. These are just
    ideas I came up with (and a bit of background infomation) that will help
    Minix 3 make it just in time to the marketplace.

  2. Re: More ideas for Minix 3.

    "Segin" schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    news:tjMmf.4325$md.1589@tornado.tampabay.rr.com...

    > I was thinking about FireWire (IEEE1394), but since that is as good as
    > dead now-a-days, I say forget it.


    Firewire is far from dead in the audio & video processing world.
    This interface is much better performing for low-latency applications
    than is USB 2.0

    Tobias



  3. Re: More ideas for Minix 3.

    Tobias Erichsen wrote:
    > "Segin" schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    > news:tjMmf.4325$md.1589@tornado.tampabay.rr.com...
    >
    >
    >>I was thinking about FireWire (IEEE1394), but since that is as good as
    >>dead now-a-days, I say forget it.

    >
    >
    > Firewire is far from dead in the audio & video processing world.
    > This interface is much better performing for low-latency applications
    > than is USB 2.0
    >
    > Tobias
    >
    >

    The only think I can think of that uses FireWire is an very old iPod.

    Maybe that is why I said that, lack of device support...

  4. Re: More ideas for Minix 3.

    "Segin" schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    news:T0Zmf.4958$md.3887@tornado.tampabay.rr.com...

    > The only think I can think of that uses FireWire is an very old iPod.
    >
    > Maybe that is why I said that, lack of device support...


    Well there is a very abundand supply of semi-pro and pro
    external soundcards which are based on FW 400 & 800.

    PCI is still the interface of choice for low-latency-audio,
    but if this is not possible (either the newest generation of
    G5 macs, or with notebooks) FW is the second best
    choice - USB seems still to have issues with low-latency
    stuff.

    But you are right that FW is not very common in the consumer
    area (apart from digital video-cams).

    Tobias



  5. Re: More ideas for Minix 3.

    Tobias Erichsen wrote:
    > > I was thinking about FireWire (IEEE1394), but since that is as good as
    > > dead now-a-days, I say forget it.


    Older serial protocols such as RS232/C transmit a single signal on a
    single wire as a voltage with respect to ground. USB and Firewire are
    both based on differential signals, where a signal is encoded as the
    voltage *difference" between two wires S+ and S-. This provides better
    quality, largely because if one wire picks up interference, the other
    usually will pick up the same, and the interference cancels out in the
    end. (You see, I'm not an electrical engineer, so I oversimply ;-) )

    USB cables have 4 wires. Two are for power; the other two are a single
    differential pair D+/D- for transmit and receive. This makes USB
    electronics and drivers comparatively complicated, error-prone, and
    slow. Firewire cables have the more obvious design, with 6 wires, of
    which two are for sending and two for receiving.

    I think it's that technical superiority that is making Firewire
    survive even while USB is more popular. I believe it is actually
    common for certain high-end applications and for use with Apple
    computers.


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