removing RedHat 9 with Partition Magic - Microsoft Windows

This is a discussion on removing RedHat 9 with Partition Magic - Microsoft Windows ; My friend has a Dell laptop with Windows XP Professional. Then my friend used Partition Magic to install RedHat 9 on it, resizing XP and putting RH 9 on a new partition. That worked more or less. Then my friend ...

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  1. removing RedHat 9 with Partition Magic


    My friend has a Dell laptop with Windows XP Professional. Then my friend
    used Partition Magic to install RedHat 9 on it, resizing XP and putting
    RH 9 on a new partition. That worked more or less. Then my friend decided
    to remove RH 9 and just have XP on it, in order to use the space for needed
    programs that run under XP. Again, it seemed like Partition Magic was the
    tool to use. There were 3 Linux partitions, one of them swap space, and
    these were easily removed using Partition Magic. Then Partition Magic was
    used to reallocate the free space and give it to the C partition. That seemed
    to go ok, although it also said it was resizing some other little partition.
    A warning came up advising to make a new repair disk, which was ignored
    because it was late and my friend was tired. Then to test the system,
    the computer was turned off and rebooted. That was when the fun started.

    The first surprise was that, instead of bringing up the usual menu to
    choose Linux or Windows, it simply went into GRUB in interactive mode.
    My friend didn't know anything about GRUB but imrpovised with the help
    command. There didn't seem to be any way to get GRUB to say what partitions
    there were and without this information there seemed to be no way to even
    get close to telling it to book the XP partition.

    My friend did not despair, since everything in the XP partition that mattered
    was backed up. So, my friend decided to simply reinstall Windows XP
    Professional from the installation CD and plopped it in the drive. First
    the machine went into Windows Setup for a while and all seemed to be going
    well until the following error message appeared on the screen:

    stop: C0000221 unknown hard error
    \SystemRoot\System32\ntdll.dll

    That didn't look so good and the system didn't respond to any commands
    after that. In fact, it was impossible even to turn off the computer after
    that. What finally worked to shut it off was removing the battery after
    the power cord was unplugged.

    Just for kicks, my friend restarted the laptop, popped in a hikarunix 4.0 CD
    in the drive while in GRUB, typed "reboot" and the Go system booted just
    fine. Then my friend halted the machine and decided to wait until tomorrow
    before doing any more with it.

    I don't know what advice to give my friend. My theory is that removing the
    Linux partition did not suffice because it left the MBR unmodified, causing
    GRUB to run and fail because it couldn't find the Linux stuff, even though
    the Windows stuff was still intact. If so, what is the remedy?

    Another idea I had was simply to get an installation CD for some version of
    Linux and use fdisk on it to get some information about what partitions
    are still intact on the hard drive. Maybe a FREEDOS or Windows boot floppy
    with fdisk could be used for the same purpose. If it will boot from the
    floppy, then maybe the booted floppy can see the C drive and perhaps one
    can change directory to it. That would make it possible to be reassured that
    the XP partition is still intact.

    If not, what would one have to do to reinstall XP without getting snagged
    on the
    stop: C0000221 unknown hard error
    \SystemRoot\System32\ntdll.dll
    mentioned above?

    So, what should my friend do?
    --
    Ignorantly,
    Allan Adler
    * Disclaimer: I am a guest and *not* a member of the MIT CSAIL. My actions and
    * comments do not reflect in any way on MIT. Also, I am nowhere near Boston.

  2. Re: removing RedHat 9 with Partition Magic

    On 23 Jun 2007 00:27:53 -0400, Allan Adler wrote:
    >
    > My friend did not despair, since everything in the XP partition that mattered
    > was backed up. So, my friend decided to simply reinstall Windows XP
    > Professional from the installation CD and plopped it in the drive. First
    > the machine went into Windows Setup for a while and all seemed to be going
    > well until the following error message appeared on the screen:


    My suggestion, use partition magic to delete all partitions.
    Boot any linux cd and zero the mbr with
    dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hda bs=1 count=446
    Then Windows XP Professional should have no problems installing beyond
    the normal installation features provided by Micro$not.

  3. Re: removing RedHat 9 with Partition Magic


    Bit Twister writes:
    >On 23 Jun 2007 00:27:53 -0400, Allan Adler wrote:
    >>
    >>My friend did not despair, since everything in the XP partition that mattered
    >> was backed up. So, my friend decided to simply reinstall Windows XP
    >> Professional from the installation CD and plopped it in the drive. First
    >> the machine went into Windows Setup for a while and all seemed to be going
    >> well until the following error message appeared on the screen:

    >
    >My suggestion, use partition magic to delete all partitions.
    >Boot any linux cd and zero the mbr with
    >dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/hda bs=1 count=446
    >Then Windows XP Professional should have no problems installing beyond
    >the normal installation features provided by Micro$not.


    Thanks, that was very helpful. We started using partition magic to delete
    partitions, but it complained when we tried to delete the main windows
    partition, telling us that as it was a primary active partition, we would
    have to designate another one, which neither of us felt equal to doing. So
    we left it alone. We did delete a 447.1 VFAT partition and noted the proximity
    of 446 to 447.1 and another tiny extended partition and some other partition.
    Then we decided to reboot and see if it was at all possible to salvage the
    Windows stuff. Rebooting put us back in GRUB. So we put the Windows
    installation disk in the CD drive and tried again to install Windows.
    This time it got as far as putting us in repair mode and we noticed that
    one of the options was to fix the MBR. This seemed like a very generous
    offer and we took it. Then we rebooted the machine and it worked fine.
    The old Windows stuff and all the software that had been resident on it
    were still there and worked as before. Then we rebooted the machine
    using partition magic and resized the main partition. Then we rebooted
    a couple of times and eventually the warnings about possibly not being able
    to access a generic something went away. According to the maintence stuff
    in Windows, the size of the HD is what we expect and an expected amount of
    it has been used. So, it looks like the operation was a complete success:
    RH 9 was removed, the Windows partition was resized and, in spite of initial
    setbacks, everything works fine.

    None of this would have been possible without your extremely helpful
    suggestions. Thanks so much for your help.
    --
    Sincerely,
    Allan Adler
    * Disclaimer: I am a guest and *not* a member of the MIT CSAIL. My actions and
    * comments do not reflect in any way on MIT. Also, I am nowhere near Boston.

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