Aren't you glad this didn't happen... - Microsoft Windows

This is a discussion on Aren't you glad this didn't happen... - Microsoft Windows ; Kelsey Bjarnason wrote: > [snips] > > On Sat, 03 Jun 2006 21:05:24 -0500, Linonut wrote: > >> You have a net connection? Then you have a way into your home for the >> cops. > > I assume that's ...

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Thread: Aren't you glad this didn't happen...

  1. Re: Aren't you glad this didn't happen...

    Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:
    > [snips]
    >
    > On Sat, 03 Jun 2006 21:05:24 -0500, Linonut wrote:
    >
    >> You have a net connection? Then you have a way into your home for the
    >> cops.

    >
    > I assume that's not meant generically. I'd love to see the cops trying to
    > break into any of my systems remotely.
    >
    >


    i'd like to see them break into ANY system remotely or even if they are
    sitting at the damn computer. these guys complained cause firefox put
    the history in a different folder to IE and their tools couldn't find it
    (was on news.com somewhere).

  2. Re: Aren't you glad this didn't happen...

    [snips]

    On Sat, 03 Jun 2006 23:33:25 +0100, William Poaster wrote:

    >> I wouldn't be too smug if I were you.

    >
    > Well for a start, I don't have any M$ crap anywhere near my machines.


    I do, at work at least, but I've finally got it all set up the way it
    should be - safely running in a VM session on my Linux desktop.

    Life is good.



  3. Re: Aren't you glad this didn't happen...

    [snips]

    On Mon, 05 Jun 2006 10:35:13 +0100, Scott W wrote:

    > i'd like to see them break into ANY system remotely or even if they are
    > sitting at the damn computer. these guys complained cause firefox put
    > the history in a different folder to IE and their tools couldn't find it
    > (was on news.com somewhere).


    Well... dunno about cops, per se... but we had an incident a while back at
    a company I was with.

    Came in to work one morning, the place is *crawling* with unexpected
    visitors. One was a suit, the rest were... well... couldn't really tell
    from the looks of most, apart from a few cops.

    All in all, we had, by the end of it, better than 30 of 'em. This
    encompassed Revenue Canada, the police, our DOD intelligence boys and CSIS
    - essentially our intelligence agency.

    These boys were *very* thorough in getting into, and getting the data out
    of, the computers.

    Oddly enough, the one machine in the place they gave only a cursory glance
    at was mine - the Linux desktop. Took 'em about 8 seconds to realize it
    wasn't a problem, or wasn't interesting, or whatever it was. The other
    machines, though, got ripped and imaged, or scanned, and a few confiscated.

    There was one other box which I got them to mostly ignore; I'd been
    working on repairing a system for the lady in the company next door, and
    her machine was there. I told them, had them check it, then promptly took
    it off site, just in case the next guy wasn't so lenient.

    Why'd it all happen? Ultimately, not sure. However, I don't think the
    use of the terms "Hack" and "System" in the company name, combined with
    the attempt to run bandwidth into the place which would put the largest
    ISPs to shame, was a particularly good idea.



  4. Re: Aren't you glad this didn't happen...

    Linonut wrote:
    > After takin' a swig o' grog, William Poaster belched out this bit o' wisdom:
    >
    >> On Sat, 03 Jun 2006 21:05:24 -0500, Linonut wrote:
    >>
    >>> That cartoon didn't have much to do with Microsoft, as far as I can tell.

    >> I thought the blue armband with the word "MICROSOFT" across it in white,
    >> was a dead giveaway...or maybe they showed a different version of the
    >> cartoon in the US..

    >
    > I didn't even notice the armband. I immediately assumed it was meant as
    > a government-instituted measure.
    >
    > Microsoft, as much as it might like to be in control here, is only the
    > conduit and implementer of the restrictions emanating from the media,
    > the broadband carriers, and, finally, the government.
    >

    Government? Aren't they just carrying out the wishes of the MPAA?

    As a side note, have you seen the stink that's arisen over the
    involvement of the state department in the raid on The Pirate Bay
    torrent site?

  5. Re: Aren't you glad this didn't happen...

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    On Mon, 05 Jun 2006 02:56:51 -0700,
    Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:
    > [snips]
    >
    > On Sat, 03 Jun 2006 23:33:25 +0100, William Poaster wrote:
    >
    >>> I wouldn't be too smug if I were you.

    >>
    >> Well for a start, I don't have any M$ crap anywhere near my machines.

    >
    > I do, at work at least, but I've finally got it all set up the way it
    > should be - safely running in a VM session on my Linux desktop.
    >
    > Life is good.
    >
    >



    bingo!

    I have a vmware session with XP-Pro, and W2K3, both suck, but I have to
    setup auth against AD for now, preperatory to moving it to a Linux LDAP
    server later. Then I can dump the W2k3 server. That will be a good day.
    I only have the XP-Pro vmware session for testing, so it can go away
    soon too.


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    --
    Jim Richardson http://www.eskimo.com/~warlock
    Life imitates art, but does it have to imitate satire?

  6. Re: Aren't you glad this didn't happen...

    [snips]

    On Mon, 05 Jun 2006 18:14:15 -0700, Jim Richardson wrote:

    > I have a vmware session with XP-Pro, and W2K3, both suck, but I have to
    > setup auth against AD for now, preperatory to moving it to a Linux LDAP
    > server later. Then I can dump the W2k3 server. That will be a good day.
    > I only have the XP-Pro vmware session for testing, so it can go away
    > soon too.


    Speaking of dumping servers...

    Ran into a glitch here. Most of us can authenticate no problem, but our
    remote site can't - and now it turns out one of the local accounts can't.

    Shouldn't be happening. The machine running the DC may be a flaky POS,
    but it's not quite in complete failure mode yet. Turns out the drive
    with the website data on it is fried, but the rest is vaguely functional.
    So why can't they get on?

    Aha! DHCP. DHCP is spewing bogus WINS addresses. Fine, fine, fix that
    up. Of course, the WINS servers themselves have bogus data, so fix that
    up. So far so good. Now our local account with the problems can get on -
    but the other guys can't.

    Turns out there are not one but two rogue DHCP servers here. One's local,
    spewing out useless IPs. The other's remote, and while it's serving up
    proper IPs for them, it's also spewing wrong WINS info - and so far, no
    way to get into it to manage things.

    What this means is, the local machines have about a 50/50 chance of
    getting an IP that's not on our subnet, and the remote sites have a
    100% chance of getting bogus info that prevents them authenticating.

    Somehow, though, the guy I took over for thought this was a _good_ design.

    Oh, and on a related note, all the servers - and most of the services -
    have different admin accounts and passwords. This, IMO, is not a bad
    idea. They're even recorded. Problem is, they're recorded, one to
    several per file, in per-server description files. Except the location
    and names of the files aren't consistent, so if you need the data on some
    machine, you're off on another pointless hunting expedition.

    Kinda makes you want to walk over to his office and punish him a bit with
    a very large stick.



  7. Paranoia (was - Re: Aren't you glad this didn't happen...)

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    On 2006-06-05, Scott W spake thusly:
    > Kelsey Bjarnason wrote:
    >> [snips]
    >>
    >> On Sat, 03 Jun 2006 21:05:24 -0500, Linonut wrote:
    >>
    >>> You have a net connection? Then you have a way into your home for the
    >>> cops.

    >>
    >> I assume that's not meant generically. I'd love to see the cops trying to
    >> break into any of my systems remotely.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > i'd like to see them break into ANY system remotely or even if they are
    > sitting at the damn computer. these guys complained cause firefox put
    > the history in a different folder to IE and their tools couldn't find it
    > (was on news.com somewhere).


    Oh, I see. The police are impotent to impact any computer system or any
    cyber crime.

    A) What guys? What "police" are you referring to.

    B) If "they" *did* have any other capabilities, do you actually think
    that "they" would make that public knowledge?

    If you think law enforcement are keystone cops on the net, then you
    are badly mistaken. Testament to this is the FBI's Carnivore and
    Magic Lantern programs, among others [1]. These are the ones that are
    /known/ to exist. This dosen't even *begin* to address the intelligence
    community. The National Security agency dosen't ever talk about what
    they can do, or even what their *mission and pupose is* .

    This is what should be of concern to everyone. Not what the civil
    rights advocates are screaming about, but what is obviously in all
    probability being done on a covert basis, and what *could* be done.
    A side note; This is what has always raised an intellectual eyebrow
    with me RE: encryption.

    Question: What level of encryption available to the common
    person is trivial for the NSA to decypher?

    Answer: This is the $64,000 dollar question. Nobody knows except
    those in the business of doing it.

    Question: How much of the governmental encryption restrictions (like
    that sillyness of classifying encryption as weapons grade products)
    and leaks as to the difficulty in cracking common algorythms is simply
    misdirection and misinformation designed to protect the above Question?

    Answer: See above answer.

    Interesting ponderables,

    Regards, your resident paranoid,

    Mathew

    [1] Hi guys. I don't have a problem with you reading my email, but
    I do wish you would quit scanning my hard drive.




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    --
    "Always do the right thing: It will delight / Aluminum Foil Deflector Beanies
    some and astound the rest" - Mark Twain / Psychotronic protection, low prices

  8. Re: Aren't you glad this didn't happen...

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    ["Followup-To:" header set to comp.os.ms-windows.advocacy.]
    On 2006-06-04, William Poaster spake thusly:
    > On Sun, 04 Jun 2006 06:42:50 -0500, Linonut wrote:
    >
    >> After takin' a swig o' grog, spike1@freenet.co.uk belched out this bit o'
    >> wisdom:
    >>
    >>> Linonut did eloquently scribble:
    >>>>> Why?
    >>>>> Microsoft free zone here, no microsoft gestapo will have authority to
    >>>>> enter my home. Ever.
    >>>
    >>>> That cartoon didn't have much to do with Microsoft, as far as I can
    >>>> tell.
    >>>
    >>> Apart from the microsoft armband?
    >>>

    >>
    >> I immediately thought in broader terms. Microsoft is not the only "enemy"
    >> of freedom out there.
    >>
    >>>> You have a net connection? Then you have a way into your home for the
    >>>> cops.
    >>>
    >>> They've got to find an active service on the other side of my firewall
    >>> they can exploit first.

    >>
    >> All they need is the help/collusion of your ISP.

    >
    > My ISP actively supports linux, & knows which OS I use. :-)


    Your point?

    regards,

    Mathew

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    --
    "Always do the right thing: It will delight / Aluminum Foil Deflector Beanies
    some and astound the rest" - Mark Twain / Psychotronic protection, low prices

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