Their thinking is stale. Their products are stale. Their packaging
and marketing, however, are superb. In fact, it's the only thing going
for them.

Windows is fundamentally based on an outdated computing
environment--that the software a person uses should reside on a
personal computer with a large hard disk, and that the only person who
will use the software will be the PC owner, that only one person will
use it at a time, that anyone else who wants to use the software needs
to install a separate copy on his/her PC, and finally, that people
should PAY for software.

With the surge of the Internet and TCP/IP LANs--this mode of computing
is not just outdated; it fails to take advantage of the sharing aspects
of the network that could substantially simplify the end-user
experience, and simultaneously simplify system administration.

Upgrades in Windows never improve or move away from this old mode of
computing--it just repackages Windows in fancier colors and icons.
Microsoft then spends its cash to market it aggressively, and the
American consumers buy all the hype and go get it.

The situation is the same with MacOS, except that the Mac is
fundamentally based on FreeBSD--a real modern OS--onto which a useless,
glitzy but marketable UI has been crafted. Essentially, Steve Jobs
took sunshine, put it in his own fancy giftwrap, and sold it. And the
strategy was profitable.

But Windows doesn't have the same "alternative" cult following that
MacOS does. The way I see it, a person who raves about Macs but knows
nothing about UNIX is simply a kiddie tech newbie who likes to be seen
as "alternative."

If FreeBSD, Linux, and thinkfree are superior to Windows, but Windows
sells more than these others, than I believe I should be able to make a
lucrative career out of selling rocks, provided I can market the rocks
well.

You just have to have one of my rocks. Everyone has one. It's the
latest thing. Check out the SuperRocks myspace site. It's like
totally aaawesome. You're just not cool if you don't own one of my
rocks. If you're a teen, you should beg your parents to buy one for
you. The basic rock is $175. The professional version, RockPro, is
$300.

These rocks are very useful. You can use them as paperweight or desk
ornaments. And you can show them off to other people--the rock is a
representation, and extension of you. You can't do that with anything
else or with competing rocks. You just have to own one of my rocks to
do that.

Rocks - Where do you want to go today?