Maximum Files in a Directory - Microsoft Windows

This is a discussion on Maximum Files in a Directory - Microsoft Windows ; P> if there is going to be a performance hit, I need [to] P> explore a different solution. Reaching a hard limit is not the same as incurring a performance hit. There will be a performance hit on NTFS for ...

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Thread: Maximum Files in a Directory

  1. Maximum Files in a Directory

    P> if there is going to be a performance hit, I need [to]
    P> explore a different solution.

    Reaching a hard limit is not the same as incurring a performance hit.

    There will be a performance hit on NTFS for directories with large
    numbers of entries in them. But it is _nowhere near_ the performance
    hit that one would have on FAT. FAT uses a simple array for
    directories. Determining that a name does not conflict with that of
    an existing entry requires scanning the entire array. NTFS uses a
    tree structure. Determining that a name does not conflict with that
    of an existing entry requires looking at a comparatively small number
    of nodes in the tree.


  2. Re: Maximum Files in a Directory

    J de Boyne Pollard wrote:
    > P> if there is going to be a performance hit, I need [to]
    > P> explore a different solution.
    >
    > Reaching a hard limit is not the same as incurring a performance hit.
    >
    > There will be a performance hit on NTFS for directories with large
    > numbers of entries in them. But it is _nowhere near_ the performance
    > hit that one would have on FAT. FAT uses a simple array for
    > directories. Determining that a name does not conflict with that of
    > an existing entry requires scanning the entire array. NTFS uses a
    > tree structure. Determining that a name does not conflict with that
    > of an existing entry requires looking at a comparatively small number
    > of nodes in the tree.


    Yes. Its been awhile since I've been into the NTFS details, but if I
    recall it uses a BTREE indexing system.

    This redesign consideration is purely for NTFS. I was going to "allow"
    for FAT32 until I saw your other post. So forget FAT32. :-) I was aware
    of old FAT drive limits and our 25+ year software products has that
    under control.

    Sorry for not being specific. In the final analysis, I probably will
    not use a single folder concept here as well. I was seeking some facts
    to decide on that design.

    Thanks for your excellent input.

    --
    HLS

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