wireless signal "weaker" in Linux than Windows - Mandriva

This is a discussion on wireless signal "weaker" in Linux than Windows - Mandriva ; Hi, I have an occurrence as at the exact same location, wireless behaves differently depending on whether I am under Windows or Linux, using same latptop. In Windows, signal reads as "excellent" (whatever that really means.) In linux, signal reads ...

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Thread: wireless signal "weaker" in Linux than Windows

  1. wireless signal "weaker" in Linux than Windows

    Hi,

    I have an occurrence as at the exact same location, wireless behaves
    differently depending on whether I am under Windows or Linux, using same
    latptop.

    In Windows, signal reads as "excellent" (whatever that really means.)

    In linux, signal reads as 81% (so I guess less than ideal.)

    In Windows, wireless speed is up to par; but in Linux, it lags
    substantially upon initial request or query (as in FF for example) and
    then, once it finds the signal, it loads pretty much at "normal" speed.

    Both firewalls (windows and linux) are off; just using NAT from DSL
    Gateway/Wireless Routeur Combo Netopia.

    Is there anything I can do to "boost" the signal under Linux?

    (I hope to soon replace the Netopia with the ISP modem + a Linksys
    WRT54GL with dd-wrt) but it could be a few weeks away.

    --
    Mandriva Free 2008.1 (X86_64)
    KDE - zsh

  2. Re: wireless signal "weaker" in Linux than Windows

    On Sat, 01 Nov 2008 10:51:03 +0000, someone posting as stef purportedly
    wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > I have an occurrence as at the exact same location, wireless behaves
    > differently depending on whether I am under Windows or Linux, using same
    > latptop.
    >
    > In Windows, signal reads as "excellent" (whatever that really means.)
    >
    > In linux, signal reads as 81% (so I guess less than ideal.)
    >
    > In Windows, wireless speed is up to par; but in Linux, it lags
    > substantially upon initial request or query (as in FF for example) and
    > then, once it finds the signal, it loads pretty much at "normal" speed.


    FWIW I'm using a 2008.1 wirelessly on an IBM R51. The signal passes
    through 4 walls and a great stinking fridge before it gets to me. I get
    only 56-61% and notice no problems. I'd be happy with 81%.



    --
    poking dumbasses in the forehead, till my finger hurts.

  3. Re: wireless signal "weaker" in Linux than Windows

    On Sat, 01 Nov 2008 10:51:03 +0000, stef wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > I have an occurrence as at the exact same location, wireless behaves
    > differently depending on whether I am under Windows or Linux, using same
    > latptop.
    >
    > In Windows, signal reads as "excellent" (whatever that really means.)
    >
    > In linux, signal reads as 81% (so I guess less than ideal.)
    >
    > In Windows, wireless speed is up to par; but in Linux, it lags
    > substantially upon initial request or query (as in FF for example) and
    > then, once it finds the signal, it loads pretty much at "normal" speed.
    >
    > Both firewalls (windows and linux) are off; just using NAT from DSL
    > Gateway/Wireless Routeur Combo Netopia.
    >
    > Is there anything I can do to "boost" the signal under Linux?
    >
    > (I hope to soon replace the Netopia with the ISP modem + a Linksys
    > WRT54GL with dd-wrt) but it could be a few weeks away.


    I expect they are using different methods to measure the same thing. I'd
    be interested in what your /etc/resolv.conf file looks like - an
    extraneous entry there could do pretty much what you describe.

  4. Re: wireless signal "weaker" in Linux than Windows

    > I expect they are using different methods to measure the same thing. I'd
    > be interested in what your /etc/resolv.conf file looks like - an
    > extraneous entry there could do pretty much what you describe.

    =================================
    Even if I don't have a specific problem I often try commands recommended
    on this NG ,just for the sake of learning ...

    How would you explain the following being root (running MDV2007.1)

    [root@localhost frank]# /etc/resolv.conf
    bash: /etc/resolv.conf: Permission denied
    [root@localhost frank]#

    Frank

  5. Re: wireless signal "weaker" in Linux than Windows

    On Sat, 01 Nov 2008 14:56:50 +0000, Highland Ham wrote:
    >
    > How would you explain the following being root (running MDV2007.1)
    >
    > [root@localhost frank]# /etc/resolv.conf
    > bash: /etc/resolv.conf: Permission denied


    the command /etc/resolv.conf indicated you want to execute
    resolv.conf which does not have the execute bit set, which is correct
    as it does not execute anything. It is a configuration file so you
    would do a
    cat /etc/resolv.conf
    to see contents.


    > [root@localhost frank]#


    You may want to consider giving your node a Fully Qualified Domain (FQDN)
    name to prevent possible problems in the future.

    Two places to change it.

    $ cat /etc/sysconfig/network
    NETWORKING_IPV6=no
    NOZEROCONF=yes
    NEEDHOSTNAME=no <==== add this line
    NETWORKING=yes
    HOSTNAME=wm81.home.test <==== Sets FQDN on boot.


    $ cat /etc/hosts
    127.0.0.1 localhost.localdomain localhost
    127.0.0.1 wm81.home.test wm81


    Put .test or .invalid on the end of your domain name. FQDN example:
    darkstar.milkyway.invalid
    ^ ----------------
    | |
    | `------ domain name
    `--- node name

  6. Re: wireless signal "weaker" in Linux than Windows

    Highland Ham wrote:

    > Even if I don't have a specific problem I often try commands
    > recommended on this NG ,just for the sake of learning ...


    good :-)

    get any of the Linux shell cheat sheets and put it next to your
    keyboard. Helps a lot when you're new to Linux


    > How would you explain the following being root (running MDV2007.1)
    >
    > [root@localhost frank]# /etc/resolv.conf
    > bash: /etc/resolv.conf: Permission denied


    You are trying to run the file instead of viewing it. Use any of the
    following to view it

    less /etc/resolv.conf
    more /etc/resolv.conf
    cat /etc/resolv.conf

    Type "q" to leave the less and more viewers

    cheers

    Mark



  7. Re: wireless signal "weaker" in Linux than Windows

    On Sat, 01 Nov 2008 10:51:03 +0000, stef wrote:

    > I have an occurrence as at the exact same location, wireless behaves
    > differently depending on whether I am under Windows or Linux, using same
    > latptop.
    >
    > In Windows, signal reads as "excellent" (whatever that really means.)
    >
    > In linux, signal reads as 81% (so I guess less than ideal.)


    No, 81% is excellent by any standards.

    However, there are actually two important parameters that many people
    here confuse. One is signal strength, the actual amplitude of the radio
    signal, the other is link quality, a measure of how much traffic can pass
    across the link. They can both be measured as percentages of maximum,
    and can be wildly different.

    What actually counts is link quality, of course.

    > In Windows, wireless speed is up to par; but in Linux, it lags
    > substantially upon initial request or query (as in FF for example) and
    > then, once it finds the signal, it loads pretty much at "normal" speed.


    Sounds like you need to tell FF not to use IPv6 for DNS. Go to
    about:config and search for ipv6.

  8. Re: wireless signal "weaker" in Linux than Windows

    On Sat, 1 Nov 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.mandriva, in article
    , stef wrote:

    >I have an occurrence as at the exact same location, wireless behaves
    >differently depending on whether I am under Windows or Linux, using
    >same latptop.
    >
    >In Windows, signal reads as "excellent" (whatever that really means.)
    >
    >In linux, signal reads as 81% (so I guess less than ideal.)


    And neither term means anything beyond Market-Speak. Signal strength
    measurements are almost always meaningless (especially in uncalibrated
    commodity grade hardware). About the best you can read into the
    figures is 'something is there'.

    >In Windows, wireless speed is up to par; but in Linux, it lags
    >substantially upon initial request or query (as in FF for example) and
    >then, once it finds the signal, it loads pretty much at "normal" speed.


    Ummm... this is not very informative. Wireless speed (or networking
    speed) is normally measured by timing the transfer of a compressed
    data file (NOT text). "finding" a signal normally refers to the delay
    between you turning on the system, and the system being able to
    exchange bits with some other host.

    I suspect what you are really referring to is typing some URL into a
    browser, hitting 'Enter' and waiting until something shows up. There
    is actually a lot of stuff happening between those two points, such
    as the browser looking in it's cache, not finding anything and sending
    a DNS lookup request, once that has been answered, establishing a
    connection to the appropriate web server, issuing a GET, and waiting
    while the web server figures out WTF and so on.

    A more likely problem is that your system is configured for IPv6, and
    is first submitting a DNS request for an IPv6 address for that URL.
    In spite of the fact that Internet regulators are pushing IPv6, a lot
    of systems are out there that don't understand it, and don't respond
    properly. Using a packet sniffer such as tcpdump, ethereal or
    wireshark, you'd probably see something like

    You "AAAA www.zippity.do.dah" -> DNS Server A
    DNS Server A "...... huh?" -> You (or maybe no response at all)
    You "AAAA www.zippity.do.dah" -> DNS Server B
    DNS Server B "...... huh?" -> You (or maybe no response at all)
    You "AA www.zippity.do.dah" -> DNS Server A
    DNS Server A "... www.zippity.do.dah is 192.0.2.14"
    You "Hello 192.0.2.14" -> 192.0.2.14

    whereas your windoze box which doesn't know about IPv6 skips the first
    four packet exchanges. Occasionally, you'll see a properly configured
    DNS server, and the Linux traffic would look like

    You "AAAA www.zippity.do.dah" -> DNS Server A
    DNS Server A "AAAA NOTIMP" -> You
    You "AA www.zippity.do.dah" -> DNS Server A
    DNS Server A "... www.zippity.do.dah is 192.0.2.14"

    where the 'NOTIMP' is the error message that says "I don't do IPv6",
    and that error usually is returned instantly (as opposed to waiting
    up to five seconds for the server to say "huh?" or the request to time
    out). That 'AAAA' query (what is the IPv6 address of) might be repeated
    to DNS server B, but things are a lot faster.

    Look at the output of 'sbin/ifconfig -a' and see if you have an IPv6
    address assigned to the network interface. That's the clue that you
    are running into this problem. The solution to that problem is to add
    (or set) 'NETWORKING_IPV6=no' in the file /etc/sysconfig/network.

    >Is there anything I can do to "boost" the signal under Linux?


    It's highly unlikely to be a signal strength problem.

    Old guy

  9. Re: wireless signal "weaker" in Linux than Windows

    On Sat, 01 Nov 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.mandriva, in article
    , Highland Ham wrote:

    >> I expect they are using different methods to measure the same thing.
    >> I'd be interested in what your /etc/resolv.conf file looks like - an
    >> extraneous entry there could do pretty much what you describe.

    >=================================
    >Even if I don't have a specific problem I often try commands
    >recommended on this NG ,just for the sake of learning ...


    That's good (and that's why people put cut-and-pastes to show the
    command and result in posts), but it is often a good idea to look at
    the manual page first, just to see what the command may do.

    >How would you explain the following being root (running MDV2007.1)


    I don't see where it was suggested to try to _run_ /etc/resolv.conf

    >[root@localhost frank]# /etc/resolv.conf
    >bash: /etc/resolv.conf: Permission denied
    >[root@localhost frank]#


    [compton ~]$ file /etc/resolv.conf
    /etc/resolv.conf: ASCII text
    [compton ~]$ whatis resolver
    resolver (5) - resolver configuration file
    [compton ~]$

    It's not an executable. (Yes, it takes extra knowledge to know about
    that man-page.)

    [compton ~]$ whatis cat less more
    cat (1) - concatenate files and print on the standard output
    less (1) - opposite of more
    more (1) - file perusal filter for crt viewing
    [compton ~]$

    As an aside, it's often really risky/dangerous to type commands as root
    without knowing what they are.

    Old guy

  10. Re: wireless signal "weaker" in Linux than Windows

    On Sat, 01 Nov 2008 13:30:46 +0000, ray wrote:

    > I expect they are using different methods to measure the same thing. I'd
    > be interested in what your /etc/resolv.conf file looks like - an
    > extraneous entry there could do pretty much what you describe.


    # Dynamic resolv.conf(5) file for glibc resolver(3) generated by
    resolvconf(8)
    # DO NOT EDIT THIS FILE BY HAND -- YOUR CHANGES WILL BE OVERWRITTEN
    nameserver 192.168.1.1



    --
    Mandriva Free 2008.1 (X86_64)
    KDE - zsh

  11. Re: wireless signal "weaker" in Linux than Windows

    On Sat, 01 Nov 2008 19:10:14 +0100, Mark Madsen wrote:

    > Sounds like you need to tell FF not to use IPv6 for DNS. Go to
    > about:config and search for ipv6.


    I did and it is much better now.

    Can you please explain what ipv6 is an what turning it off does for FF?
    Tx.



    --
    Mandriva Free 2008.1 (X86_64)
    KDE - zsh

  12. Re: wireless signal "weaker" in Linux than Windows

    On Sun, 2 Nov 2008, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.os.linux.mandriva, in article
    , stef wrote:

    >Mark Madsen wrote:


    >> Sounds like you need to tell FF not to use IPv6 for DNS. Go to
    >> about:config and search for ipv6.

    >
    >I did and it is much better now.
    >
    >Can you please explain what ipv6 is an what turning it off does for
    >FF?


    Linux+IPv6-HOWTO, Linux IPv6 HOWTO

    Updated: Oct 2007. The goal of this HOWTO is to answer both basic and
    advanced questions about IPv6 on the Linux operating system. This HOWTO
    will provide the reader with enough information to install, configure,
    and use IPv6 applications on Linux machines.

    For further details, see my earlier response to your original question.

    Old guy

  13. Re: wireless signal "weaker" in Linux than Windows

    On Sat, 01 Nov 2008 20:41:54 -0500, Moe Trin wrote:

    >>
    >>Can you please explain what ipv6 is an what turning it off does for FF?

    >
    > Linux+IPv6-HOWTO, Linux IPv6 HOWTO
    >
    > Updated: Oct 2007. The goal of this HOWTO is to answer both basic
    > and advanced questions about IPv6 on the Linux operating system.
    > This HOWTO will provide the reader with enough information to
    > install, configure, and use IPv6 applications on Linux machines.
    >
    > For further details, see my earlier response to your original question.
    >
    > Old guy


    Sorry, I missed the long post which threaded below this one in my
    newsreader.

    You are I believe absolutely correct in that my system must be configured
    to use ipv6.

    Another confirmation of that is I turned off ipv6 in TB as well, and it is
    lightning fast now (I use IMAP). I had noticed the sluggishness in
    resolving the domain (DNS) but thought it was caused by something else.

    So, a BETTER solution, instead of individually turning off ipv6 by
    application; is to do it on a system wide basis.

    To quote you:

    "The solution to that problem is to add (or set) 'NETWORKING_IPV6=no' in
    the file /etc/sysconfig/network."

    That should turn off ipv6 for the whole system, correct?

    If yes, then setting either FF or TB not to use ipv6 in about:config would
    be irrelevant. Correct?





    --
    Mandriva Free 2008.1 (X86_64)
    KDE - zsh

  14. Re: wireless signal "weaker" in Linux than Windows

    stef writes:

    >On Sat, 01 Nov 2008 19:10:14 +0100, Mark Madsen wrote:


    >> Sounds like you need to tell FF not to use IPv6 for DNS. Go to
    >> about:config and search for ipv6.


    >I did and it is much better now.


    >Can you please explain what ipv6 is an what turning it off does for FF?
    >Tx.


    IP V6 is a new internet addressing protocol. Instead of only 4 bytes for
    the address (2^32= 4 10^9 addresses) it uses 16 bytes. However many
    routers, computers do not understand it yet ( It has only been 10 years, so
    what's the hurry). thus as mentioned your system asks for ipv6 addresses
    first, and only when it gets a few Duh responses does it ask for the ipv4
    address. Telling FF to only use IPv4 eliminates that.





  15. Re: wireless signal "weaker" in Linux than Windows

    On Sun, 02 Nov 2008 02:54:50 +0000, Unruh wrote:

    > IP V6 is a new internet addressing protocol. Instead of only 4 bytes for
    > the address (2^32= 4 10^9 addresses) it uses 16 bytes. However many
    > routers, computers do not understand it yet ( It has only been 10 years,
    > so what's the hurry). thus as mentioned your system asks for ipv6
    > addresses first, and only when it gets a few Duh responses does it ask
    > for the ipv4 address. Telling FF to only use IPv4 eliminates that.


    Right, I understand.
    I'm sure the routeur I use is not recognizing it, or something of the
    sort.

    Any ideas as to the system-wide solution to turn off/disable ipv6?

    add in line:
    NETWORKING_IPV6=no
    in /etc/sysconfig/network ?



    --
    Mandriva Free 2008.1 (X86_64)
    KDE - zsh

  16. Re: wireless signal "weaker" in Linux than Windows

    On Sun, 02 Nov 2008 10:28:46 +0000, stef wrote:

    > On Sun, 02 Nov 2008 02:54:50 +0000, Unruh wrote:
    >
    >> IP V6 is a new internet addressing protocol. Instead of only 4 bytes
    >> for the address (2^32= 4 10^9 addresses) it uses 16 bytes. However many
    >> routers, computers do not understand it yet ( It has only been 10
    >> years, so what's the hurry). thus as mentioned your system asks for
    >> ipv6 addresses first, and only when it gets a few Duh responses does it
    >> ask for the ipv4 address. Telling FF to only use IPv4 eliminates that.

    >
    > Right, I understand.
    > I'm sure the routeur I use is not recognizing it, or something of the
    > sort.
    >
    > Any ideas as to the system-wide solution to turn off/disable ipv6?
    >
    > add in line:
    > NETWORKING_IPV6=no
    > in /etc/sysconfig/network ?


    I've also seen this fix:

    Create a file in /etc/modpinstall ipv6 /bin/true
    with the following line in it:
    install ipv6 /bin/true

    to ensure ipv6 does not get loaded no matter what

    from <http://www.g-loaded.eu/2008/05/12/ho...in-fedora-and-
    centos/>

    I noticed that ipv6 module was still being loaded by my system even after
    adding the NETWORKING_IPV6=no in the /etc/sysconfig/network file
    so I went for the other solution as well to give it a shot and it does
    seem that now, ipv6 is not being loaded system wide.

    I don't know if I did the right thing or overkill, etc.



    --
    Mandriva Free 2008.1 (X86_64)
    KDE - zsh

  17. Re: wireless signal "weaker" in Linux than Windows

    On Sun, 2 Nov 2008 11:08:31 +0000 (UTC), stef wrote:
    >
    > I've also seen this fix:
    >
    > Create a file in /etc/modpinstall ipv6 /bin/true
    > with the following line in it:
    > install ipv6 /bin/true


    That is the recommendation in /usr/share/doc/initscripts/sysconfig.txt
    but that gave me errors only seen during boot. Solution used
    alias net-pf-10 off

    > to ensure ipv6 does not get loaded no matter what
    >
    > from <http://www.g-loaded.eu/2008/05/12/ho...in-fedora-and-
    > centos/>



    What works for me on Mandriva 2008.x is adding
    alias net-pf-10 off to /etc/modprobe.conf
    and I have NETWORKING_IPV6=no in /etc/sysconfig/network even though
    /usr/share/doc/initscripts/sysconfig.txt shows it obsolete.


  18. Re: wireless signal "weaker" in Linux than Windows

    On Sun, 02 Nov 2008 14:32:22 +0000, Bit Twister wrote:

    > What works for me on Mandriva 2008.x is adding
    > alias net-pf-10 off to /etc/modprobe.conf
    > and I have NETWORKING_IPV6=no in /etc/sysconfig/network even though
    > /usr/share/doc/initscripts/sysconfig.txt shows it obsolete.


    OK.

    alias net-pf-10 off is already in /etc/modprobe/comf as is the other line
    in sysconfig/network

    I note that even after having applied the NETWORKING_IPV6=no fix, lsmod |
    grep ipv6 still showed an ipv6 module loaded.

    Only after applying the fix described here:


    did the system not load any ipv6 modules.





    --
    Mandriva Free 2008.1 (X86_64)
    KDE - zsh

  19. Re: wireless signal "weaker" in Linux than Windows

    On Sun, 2 Nov 2008 16:08:43 +0000 (UTC), stef wrote:
    >
    > OK.
    >
    > alias net-pf-10 off is already in /etc/modprobe/comf



    I wonder if you have a carriage return after the line. Check it by doing a
    cat /etc/modprobe.conf
    and verify your command line prompt is on the next line.
    NOT at the end of alias net-pf-10 off

    > as is the other line
    > in sysconfig/network
    >
    > I note that even after having applied the NETWORKING_IPV6=no fix, lsmod |
    > grep ipv6 still showed an ipv6 module loaded.


    How odd. I assume you rebooted after changes.

    # modprobe -v ipv6
    [root@wm81 ~]#


    # grep net-pf /etc/modprobe.conf
    alias net-pf-10 off
    [root@wm81 ~]#

    # cat /etc/sysconfig/network
    NETWORKING_IPV6=no
    NOZEROCONF=yes
    NEEDHOSTNAME=no
    NETWORKING=yes
    HOSTNAME=wm81.home.test

    # chkconfig --list avahi-daemon
    avahi-daemon 0ff 1ff 2ff 3ff 4ff 5ff 6ff

  20. Re: wireless signal "weaker" in Linux than Windows

    On Sun, 2 Nov 2008 16:44:17 +0000 (UTC), Bit Twister wrote:
    > On Sun, 2 Nov 2008 16:08:43 +0000 (UTC), stef wrote:
    >> I note that even after having applied the NETWORKING_IPV6=no fix, lsmod |
    >> grep ipv6 still showed an ipv6 module loaded.


    Opps, module is there
    # lsmod | grep ipv6
    ipv6 241540 21 nf_conntrack_h323

    but I have yet to have slow dns look ups via firefox with no firefox changes.

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