Differences between 32bits & 64bits CD ? - Mandriva

This is a discussion on Differences between 32bits & 64bits CD ? - Mandriva ; Hi, Are all applications available on 32bits version, still available to 64bits version ? Open Office, Java, Android emulator :-) , Eclipse, nVidia proprietary drivers, HP printer drivers, etc Are there as stable as 32bits version ? What are the ...

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Thread: Differences between 32bits & 64bits CD ?

  1. Differences between 32bits & 64bits CD ?

    Hi,

    Are all applications available on 32bits version, still available to
    64bits version ?

    Open Office, Java, Android emulator :-) , Eclipse, nVidia proprietary
    drivers, HP printer drivers, etc

    Are there as stable as 32bits version ?

    What are the risks of passing from 32bits to 64bits ?

  2. Re: Differences between 32bits & 64bits CD ?

    webcam drivers, sound support, ...

  3. Re: Differences between 32bits & 64bits CD ?

    On Wednesday 15 October 2008 10:26, someone identifying as *Nanard* wrote
    in /alt.os.linux.mandriva:/

    > Hi,
    >
    > Are all applications available on 32bits version, still available to
    > 64bits version ?


    Yes. Sort of. ;-)

    > Open Office,


    Exists in 64-bit version.

    > Java,


    Should exist in 64-bit version, but can eventually be installed in 32-bit
    version for use with a 32-bit browser, or eventually via
    the /nspluginwrapper,/ which allows 32-bit browser plugins to function
    inside a 64-bit browser.

    > Android emulator


    Don't know that one. Check your repositories or the documentation of the
    software at the vendor site.

    > :-) , Eclipse,


    Not familiar with that either. Same as above.

    > nVidia proprietary drivers,


    They exist in 64-bit versions too.

    > HP printer drivers, etc


    Should exist in 64-bit versions.

    > Are there as stable as 32bits version ?


    Yes.

    > What are the risks of passing from 32bits to 64bits ?


    No risks. Just added complexity because some things are only available in
    32-bit versions and thus require a 32-bit environment, but you can install
    that seamlessly alongside the 64-bit stuff. If the stuff you're interested
    in is supplied as part of your distribution, then this will all be
    preconfigured and the dependencies will be pulled in just like in any other
    environment.

    Sound support and webcam drivers are normally part of the kernel and would
    thus always come in 64-bit or 32-bit versions depending on the kernel
    you're using. All GPL'ed open source drivers are already part of the
    kernel as it ships with your distribution. Proprietary drivers must be
    fetched from their respective vendors' websites, unless you're using a
    commercial distribution which packs those proprietary drivers.

    This said, Mandriva does come with a lot of proprietary drivers if you buy
    the PowerPack. The Mandriva Free distribution does not come with any
    proprietary stuff, but you can then still fetch the drivers from their
    respective home website for free - as in "free beer" - and install them
    yourself using the instructions provided by the developers of those
    drivers.

    --
    *Aragorn*
    (registered GNU/Linux user #223157)

  4. Re: Differences between 32bits & 64bits CD ?

    Thanks for this detailed answer.

    I still wonder if I will use this 64bits version... :-)

    I need to work with Linux (mainly Java/J2EE/Android developpment/
    debug), not spend time with install/conf/test stuff....

  5. Re: Differences between 32bits & 64bits CD ?

    Nanard wrote:
    > I still wonder if I will use this 64bits version... :-)
    >
    > I need to work with Linux (mainly Java/J2EE/Android developpment/
    > debug), not spend time with install/conf/test stuff....


    Java IcedTea 1.7 (the 64-bit default) is a preproduction version (per
    Sun) and will not work properly with all apps that call it. Java 1.6
    for 64-bit does not include javaws.

    "Most" things work fine. I do use a javaws software package that for
    each use is downloaded from a remote server. It then runs in a
    sandbox, and at close of the session it is deleted from my machine.

    For that, I run a 32-bit 2008.1 OR (recently) 2009.0 machine under
    VirtualBox. That works nicely, but I cannot address other apps as
    that one is the only one I run on a virtual machine.

    As has been mentioned, you can install 32-bit Java alongside 64-bit
    and use nspluginwrapper, or install a 32-bit version alongside or
    instead of the 64-bit application. Firefox and Open Office are two
    apps often handled in this manner. I use 64-bit for both, but there
    are some website pages Firefox will not handle and my use of OO is
    limited. I have had no problems, but neither do I use much of the
    functionality available.

    I know nothing of Android, and have not tried to do any debuggery in
    ages.

    Cheers!

    jim b.

    --
    UNIX is not user unfriendly; it merely
    expects users to be computer-friendly.

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